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This infrared image from NASA's Spitzer Space Telescope shows what astronomers are referring to as a 'snake' (upper left) and its surrounding stormy environment.
This infrared image from NASA's Spitzer Space Telescope shows what astronomers are referring to as a 'snake' (upper left) and its surrounding stormy environment.

Where Galactic Snakes Live

This infrared image from NASA's Spitzer Space Telescope shows what astronomers are referring to as a 'snake' (upper left) and its surrounding stormy environment.

Mission: Spitzer Space Telescope
Spacecraft: Spitzer Space Telescope
Instrument: Infrared Array Camera (IRAC), Multiband Imaging Photometer (MIPS)
ID#: PIA01318
Added: 2006-10-27

Views: 13089

Where Galactic Snakes Live

This infrared image from NASA's Spitzer Space Telescope shows what astronomers are referring to as a 'snake' (upper left) and its surrounding stormy environment.

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The potential planet-forming disk (or 'protoplanetary disk') of a sun-like star is being violently ripped away by the powerful winds of a nearby hot O-type star in this image from NASA's Spitzer Space Telescope.
The potential planet-forming disk (or 'protoplanetary disk') of a sun-like star is being violently ripped away by the powerful winds of a nearby hot O-type star in this image from NASA's Spitzer Space Telescope.

A Star's Close Encounter

The potential planet-forming disk (or 'protoplanetary disk') of a sun-like star is being violently ripped away by the powerful winds of a nearby hot O-type star in this image from NASA's Spitzer Space Telescope.

Mission: Spitzer Space Telescope
Spacecraft: Spitzer Space Telescope
Instrument: Multiband Imaging Photometer (MIPS)
ID#: PIA01319
Added: 2006-10-03

Views: 4703

A Star's Close Encounter

The potential planet-forming disk (or 'protoplanetary disk') of a sun-like star is being violently ripped away by the powerful winds of a nearby hot O-type star in this image from NASA's Spitzer Space Telescope.

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A star's spectacular death in the constellation Taurus was observed on Earth as the supernova of 1054 A.D. This composite image uses data from three of NASA's Great Observatories. The Chandra X-ray, Hubble Space, and Spitzer Space Telescope.
A star's spectacular death in the constellation Taurus was observed on Earth as the supernova of 1054 A.D. This composite image uses data from three of NASA's Great Observatories. The Chandra X-ray, Hubble Space, and Spitzer Space Telescope.

Dead Star Creates Celestial Havoc

A star's spectacular death in the constellation Taurus was observed on Earth as the supernova of 1054 A.D. This composite image uses data from three of NASA's Great Observatories. The Chandra X-ray, Hubble Space, and Spitzer Space Telescope.

Mission: Spitzer Space Telescope
Spacecraft: Chandra X-ray Telescope, Hubble Space Telescope, Spitzer Space Telescope
Instrument: Infrared Array Camera (IRAC), Multiband Imaging Photometer (MIPS)
ID#: PIA01320
Added: 2006-10-27

Views: 21067

Dead Star Creates Celestial Havoc

A star's spectacular death in the constellation Taurus was observed on Earth as the supernova of 1054 A.D. This composite image uses data from three of NASA's Great Observatories. The Chandra X-ray, Hubble Space, and Spitzer Space Telescope.

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NASA's Spitzer and Hubble Space Telescopes have teamed up to expose the chaos that baby stars are creating 1,500 light-years away in a cosmic cloud called the Orion nebula.
NASA's Spitzer and Hubble Space Telescopes have teamed up to expose the chaos that baby stars are creating 1,500 light-years away in a cosmic cloud called the Orion nebula.

Chaos at the Heart of Orion

NASA's Spitzer and Hubble Space Telescopes have teamed up to expose the chaos that baby stars are creating 1,500 light-years away in a cosmic cloud called the Orion nebula.

Mission: Spitzer Space Telescope
Spacecraft: Hubble Space Telescope, Spitzer Space Telescope
Instrument: Infrared Array Camera (IRAC), Ultraviolet/Visible Camera
ID#: PIA01322
Added: 2006-11-07

Views: 26387

Chaos at the Heart of Orion

NASA's Spitzer and Hubble Space Telescopes have teamed up to expose the chaos that baby stars are creating 1,500 light-years away in a cosmic cloud called the Orion nebula.

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This artist's concept shows a supermassive black hole at the center of a remote galaxy digesting the remnants of a star.
This artist's concept shows a supermassive black hole at the center of a remote galaxy digesting the remnants of a star.

Black Hole Grabs Starry Snack (Artist Concept)

This artist's concept shows a supermassive black hole at the center of a remote galaxy digesting the remnants of a star.

Mission: Galaxy Evolution Explorer (GALEX)
Spacecraft: GALEX Orbiter
ID#: PIA01884
Added: 2006-12-05

Views: 10698

Black Hole Grabs Starry Snack (Artist Concept)

This artist's concept shows a supermassive black hole at the center of a remote galaxy digesting the remnants of a star.

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This artist concept shows that NASA's Spitzer Space Telescope found evidence that this star, the remains of which are named Cassiopeia A, exploded with some degree of order, preserving chunks of its onion-like layers as it blasted apart.
This artist concept shows that NASA's Spitzer Space Telescope found evidence that this star, the remains of which are named Cassiopeia A, exploded with some degree of order, preserving chunks of its onion-like layers as it blasted apart.

Once an Onion, Always an Onion (Artist Concept)

This artist concept shows that NASA's Spitzer Space Telescope found evidence that this star, the remains of which are named Cassiopeia A, exploded with some degree of order, preserving chunks of its onion-like layers as it blasted apart.

Target: Cassiopeia A
Mission: Spitzer Space Telescope
ID#: PIA01901
Added: 2006-10-26

Views: 5014

Once an Onion, Always an Onion (Artist Concept)

This artist concept shows that NASA's Spitzer Space Telescope found evidence that this star, the remains of which are named Cassiopeia A, exploded with some degree of order, preserving chunks of its onion-like layers as it blasted apart.

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This artist's concept shows the explosion of a massive star, the remains of which are named Cassiopeia A. NASA's Spitzer Space Telescope found evidence that the star exploded with some degree of order.
This artist's concept shows the explosion of a massive star, the remains of which are named Cassiopeia A. NASA's Spitzer Space Telescope found evidence that the star exploded with some degree of order.

Order Amidst Chaos of Star's Explosion (Artist Concept)

This artist's concept shows the explosion of a massive star, the remains of which are named Cassiopeia A. NASA's Spitzer Space Telescope found evidence that the star exploded with some degree of order.

Target: Cassiopeia A
Mission: Spitzer Space Telescope
Spacecraft: Spitzer Space Telescope
Instrument: Infrared Array Camera (IRAC)
ID#: PIA01902
Added: 2006-10-26

Views: 5489

Order Amidst Chaos of Star's Explosion (Artist Concept)

This artist's concept shows the explosion of a massive star, the remains of which are named Cassiopeia A. NASA's Spitzer Space Telescope found evidence that the star exploded with some degree of order.

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This image from NASA's Spitzer Space Telescope shows the scattered remains of an exploded star named Cassiopeia A. Spitzer's infrared detectors 'picked' through these remains and found that much of the star's original layering had been preserved.
This image from NASA's Spitzer Space Telescope shows the scattered remains of an exploded star named Cassiopeia A. Spitzer's infrared detectors 'picked' through these remains and found that much of the star's original layering had been preserved.

Lighting up a Dead Star's Layers

This image from NASA's Spitzer Space Telescope shows the scattered remains of an exploded star named Cassiopeia A. Spitzer's infrared detectors 'picked' through these remains and found that much of the star's original layering had been preserved.

Target: Cassiopeia A
Mission: Spitzer Space Telescope
Spacecraft: Spitzer Space Telescope
Instrument: Infrared Array Camera (IRAC)
ID#: PIA01903
Added: 2006-10-26

Views: 16203

Lighting up a Dead Star's Layers

This image from NASA's Spitzer Space Telescope shows the scattered remains of an exploded star named Cassiopeia A. Spitzer's infrared detectors 'picked' through these remains and found that much of the star's original layering had been preserved.

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This artist's animation shows a blistering world revolving around its nearby 'sun.' NASA's infrared Spitzer Space Telescope observed a planetary system like this one, as the planet's sunlit and dark hemispheres swung alternately into the telescope's view.
This artist's animation shows a blistering world revolving around its nearby 'sun.' NASA's infrared Spitzer Space Telescope observed a planetary system like this one, as the planet's sunlit and dark hemispheres swung alternately into the telescope's view.

Fire and Ice Planet (Artist Concept)

This artist's animation shows a blistering world revolving around its nearby 'sun.' NASA's infrared Spitzer Space Telescope observed a planetary system like this one, as the planet's sunlit and dark hemispheres swung alternately into the telescope's view.

Mission: Spitzer Space Telescope
Spacecraft: Spitzer Space Telescope
ID#: PIA01936
Added: 2006-10-12

Views: 6913

Fire and Ice Planet (Artist Concept)

This artist's animation shows a blistering world revolving around its nearby 'sun.' NASA's infrared Spitzer Space Telescope observed a planetary system like this one, as the planet's sunlit and dark hemispheres swung alternately into the telescope's view.

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The top graph consists of infrared data from NASA's Spitzer Space Telescope. It tells astronomers that a distant planet, called Upsilon Andromedae b, always has a giant hot spot on the side that faces the star, while the other side is cold and dark.
The top graph consists of infrared data from NASA's Spitzer Space Telescope. It tells astronomers that a distant planet, called Upsilon Andromedae b, always has a giant hot spot on the side that faces the star, while the other side is cold and dark.

The Light and Dark Sides of a Distant Planet

The top graph consists of infrared data from NASA's Spitzer Space Telescope. It tells astronomers that a distant planet, called Upsilon Andromedae b, always has a giant hot spot on the side that faces the star, while the other side is cold and dark.

Mission: Spitzer Space Telescope
Spacecraft: Spitzer Space Telescope
Instrument: Multiband Imaging Photometer (MIPS)
ID#: PIA01937
Added: 2006-10-12

Views: 5423

The Light and Dark Sides of a Distant Planet

The top graph consists of infrared data from NASA's Spitzer Space Telescope. It tells astronomers that a distant planet, called Upsilon Andromedae b, always has a giant hot spot on the side that faces the star, while the other side is cold and dark.

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This artist's concept shows a Jupiter-like planet soaking up the scorching rays of its nearby 'sun.' This NASA Spitzer Space Telescope illustration portrays how the planet would appear to infrared eyes, showing temperature variations across its surface.
This artist's concept shows a Jupiter-like planet soaking up the scorching rays of its nearby 'sun.' This NASA Spitzer Space Telescope illustration portrays how the planet would appear to infrared eyes, showing temperature variations across its surface.

Exotic World Blisters Under the Sun (Artist Concept)

This artist's concept shows a Jupiter-like planet soaking up the scorching rays of its nearby 'sun.' This NASA Spitzer Space Telescope illustration portrays how the planet would appear to infrared eyes, showing temperature variations across its surface.

Mission: Spitzer Space Telescope
Spacecraft: Spitzer Space Telescope
ID#: PIA01938
Added: 2006-10-12

Views: 6945

Exotic World Blisters Under the Sun (Artist Concept)

This artist's concept shows a Jupiter-like planet soaking up the scorching rays of its nearby 'sun.' This NASA Spitzer Space Telescope illustration portrays how the planet would appear to infrared eyes, showing temperature variations across its surface.

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Like great friends, galaxies stick together. Astronomers using NASA's Spitzer Space Telescope have spotted a handful of great galactic pals bonding back when the universe was a mere 4.6 billion years old.
Like great friends, galaxies stick together. Astronomers using NASA's Spitzer Space Telescope have spotted a handful of great galactic pals bonding back when the universe was a mere 4.6 billion years old.

Great Galactic Buddies

Like great friends, galaxies stick together. Astronomers using NASA's Spitzer Space Telescope have spotted a handful of great galactic pals bonding back when the universe was a mere 4.6 billion years old.

Mission: Spitzer Space Telescope
Spacecraft: Spitzer Space Telescope
Instrument: Infrared Array Camera (IRAC)
ID#: PIA02038
Added: 2006-03-21

Views: 3587

Great Galactic Buddies

Like great friends, galaxies stick together. Astronomers using NASA's Spitzer Space Telescope have spotted a handful of great galactic pals bonding back when the universe was a mere 4.6 billion years old.

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This artist's concept based on data fromNASA's Spitzer Space Telescope shows delicate greenish crystals sprinkled throughout the violent core of a pair of colliding galaxies. The white spots represent a thriving population of stars of all sizes and ages.
This artist's concept based on data fromNASA's Spitzer Space Telescope shows delicate greenish crystals sprinkled throughout the violent core of a pair of colliding galaxies. The white spots represent a thriving population of stars of all sizes and ages.

Galactic Hearts of Glass (Artist Concept)

This artist's concept based on data fromNASA's Spitzer Space Telescope shows delicate greenish crystals sprinkled throughout the violent core of a pair of colliding galaxies. The white spots represent a thriving population of stars of all sizes and ages.

Mission: Spitzer Space Telescope
Spacecraft: Spitzer Space Telescope
Instrument: Infrared Spectrograph (IRS)
ID#: PIA02180
Added: 2006-02-15

Views: 5508

Galactic Hearts of Glass (Artist Concept)

This artist's concept based on data fromNASA's Spitzer Space Telescope shows delicate greenish crystals sprinkled throughout the violent core of a pair of colliding galaxies. The white spots represent a thriving population of stars of all sizes and ages.

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The false-color composite image of the Stephan's Quintet galaxy cluster is made up of data from NASA's Spitzer Space Telescope and a ground-based telescope in Spain.
The false-color composite image of the Stephan's Quintet galaxy cluster is made up of data from NASA's Spitzer Space Telescope and a ground-based telescope in Spain.

A Shocking Surprise in Stephan's Quintet

The false-color composite image of the Stephan's Quintet galaxy cluster is made up of data from NASA's Spitzer Space Telescope and a ground-based telescope in Spain.

Mission: Spitzer Space Telescope
Spacecraft: Spitzer Space Telescope
Instrument: Infrared Array Camera (IRAC), Near Infrared Spectrometer
ID#: PIA02587
Added: 2006-03-03

Views: 8409

A Shocking Surprise in Stephan's Quintet

The false-color composite image of the Stephan's Quintet galaxy cluster is made up of data from NASA's Spitzer Space Telescope and a ground-based telescope in Spain.

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This infrared image from NASA's Spitzer Space Telescope shows a galaxy that appears to be sizzling hot, with huge plumes of smoke swirling around it. The galaxy is known as Messier 82 or the 'Cigar galaxy.'
This infrared image from NASA's Spitzer Space Telescope shows a galaxy that appears to be sizzling hot, with huge plumes of smoke swirling around it. The galaxy is known as Messier 82 or the 'Cigar galaxy.'

Smokin' Hot Galaxy (animation)

This infrared image from NASA's Spitzer Space Telescope shows a galaxy that appears to be sizzling hot, with huge plumes of smoke swirling around it. The galaxy is known as Messier 82 or the 'Cigar galaxy.'

Mission: Spitzer Space Telescope
Spacecraft: Spitzer Space Telescope
Instrument: Infrared Array Camera (IRAC)
ID#: PIA02917
Added: 2006-03-16

Views: 15523

Smokin' Hot Galaxy (animation)

This infrared image from NASA's Spitzer Space Telescope shows a galaxy that appears to be sizzling hot, with huge plumes of smoke swirling around it. The galaxy is known as Messier 82 or the 'Cigar galaxy.'

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NASA's Spitzer Space Telescope has captured this stunning infrared view of the famous galaxy Messier 31, also known as Andromeda.
NASA's Spitzer Space Telescope has captured this stunning infrared view of the famous galaxy Messier 31, also known as Andromeda.

Amazing Andromeda in Red

NASA's Spitzer Space Telescope has captured this stunning infrared view of the famous galaxy Messier 31, also known as Andromeda.

Target: M31
Mission: Spitzer Space Telescope
Spacecraft: Spitzer Space Telescope
Instrument: Multiband Imaging Photometer (MIPS)
ID#: PIA03031
Added: 2005-10-13

Views: 11060

Amazing Andromeda in Red

NASA's Spitzer Space Telescope has captured this stunning infrared view of the famous galaxy Messier 31, also known as Andromeda.

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This image from NASA's Galaxy Evolution Explorer shows M33, the Triangulum Galaxy, is a perennial favorite of amateur and professional astronomers alike, due to its orientation and relative proximity to us.
This image from NASA's Galaxy Evolution Explorer shows M33, the Triangulum Galaxy, is a perennial favorite of amateur and professional astronomers alike, due to its orientation and relative proximity to us.

Anatomy of a Triangulum

This image from NASA's Galaxy Evolution Explorer shows M33, the Triangulum Galaxy, is a perennial favorite of amateur and professional astronomers alike, due to its orientation and relative proximity to us.

Target: M33
Mission: Galaxy Evolution Explorer (GALEX)
Spacecraft: GALEX Orbiter
Instrument: GALEX Telescope
ID#: PIA03033
Added: 2005-10-13

Views: 7628

Anatomy of a Triangulum

This image from NASA's Galaxy Evolution Explorer shows M33, the Triangulum Galaxy, is a perennial favorite of amateur and professional astronomers alike, due to its orientation and relative proximity to us.

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This artist's concept shows microscopic crystals in the dusty disk surrounding a brown dwarf, or 'failed star.' The crystals, made up of a green mineral found on Earth called olivine, are thought to help seed the formation of planets.
This artist's concept shows microscopic crystals in the dusty disk surrounding a brown dwarf, or 'failed star.' The crystals, made up of a green mineral found on Earth called olivine, are thought to help seed the formation of planets.

Sowing the Seeds of Planets? (Artist's Concept)

This artist's concept shows microscopic crystals in the dusty disk surrounding a brown dwarf, or 'failed star.' The crystals, made up of a green mineral found on Earth called olivine, are thought to help seed the formation of planets.

Mission: Spitzer Space Telescope
Spacecraft: Spitzer Space Telescope
ID#: PIA03048
Added: 2005-10-20

Views: 7646

Sowing the Seeds of Planets? (Artist's Concept)

This artist's concept shows microscopic crystals in the dusty disk surrounding a brown dwarf, or 'failed star.' The crystals, made up of a green mineral found on Earth called olivine, are thought to help seed the formation of planets.

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This majestic false-color image from NASA's Spitzer Space Telescope shows 'mountains' where stars are born. These towering pillars of cool gas and dust are illuminated at their tips with light from warm embryonic stars.
This majestic false-color image from NASA's Spitzer Space Telescope shows 'mountains' where stars are born. These towering pillars of cool gas and dust are illuminated at their tips with light from warm embryonic stars.

Towering Infernos

This majestic false-color image from NASA's Spitzer Space Telescope shows 'mountains' where stars are born. These towering pillars of cool gas and dust are illuminated at their tips with light from warm embryonic stars.

Mission: Spitzer Space Telescope
Spacecraft: Spitzer Space Telescope
Instrument: Infrared Array Camera (IRAC)
ID#: PIA03096
Added: 2005-11-09

Views: 9763

Towering Infernos

This majestic false-color image from NASA's Spitzer Space Telescope shows 'mountains' where stars are born. These towering pillars of cool gas and dust are illuminated at their tips with light from warm embryonic stars.

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In visible light, the bulk of our Milky Way galaxy's stars are eclipsed behind thick clouds of galactic dust and gas. But to the infrared eyes of NASA's Spitzer Space Telescope, distant stars and dust clouds shine with unparalleled clarity and color.
In visible light, the bulk of our Milky Way galaxy's stars are eclipsed behind thick clouds of galactic dust and gas. But to the infrared eyes of NASA's Spitzer Space Telescope, distant stars and dust clouds shine with unparalleled clarity and color.

A Glimpse of the Milky Way

In visible light, the bulk of our Milky Way galaxy's stars are eclipsed behind thick clouds of galactic dust and gas. But to the infrared eyes of NASA's Spitzer Space Telescope, distant stars and dust clouds shine with unparalleled clarity and color.

Target: Milky Way
Mission: Spitzer Space Telescope
Spacecraft: Spitzer Space Telescope
Instrument: Infrared Array Camera (IRAC)
ID#: PIA03239
Added: 2005-12-13

Views: 12195

A Glimpse of the Milky Way

In visible light, the bulk of our Milky Way galaxy's stars are eclipsed behind thick clouds of galactic dust and gas. But to the infrared eyes of NASA's Spitzer Space Telescope, distant stars and dust clouds shine with unparalleled clarity and color.

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This graph, or spectrum, from NASA's Spitzer Space Telescope tells astronomers that some of the most basic ingredients of DNA and protein are concentrated in a dusty planet-forming disk circling a young sun-like star called IRS 46.
This graph, or spectrum, from NASA's Spitzer Space Telescope tells astronomers that some of the most basic ingredients of DNA and protein are concentrated in a dusty planet-forming disk circling a young sun-like star called IRS 46.

Life's Starting Materials Found in Dusty Disk

This graph, or spectrum, from NASA's Spitzer Space Telescope tells astronomers that some of the most basic ingredients of DNA and protein are concentrated in a dusty planet-forming disk circling a young sun-like star called IRS 46.

Target: IRS 46
Mission: Spitzer Space Telescope
Spacecraft: Spitzer Space Telescope
Instrument: Infrared Spectrograph (IRS)
ID#: PIA03242
Added: 2005-12-20

Views: 6893

Life's Starting Materials Found in Dusty Disk

This graph, or spectrum, from NASA's Spitzer Space Telescope tells astronomers that some of the most basic ingredients of DNA and protein are concentrated in a dusty planet-forming disk circling a young sun-like star called IRS 46.

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This artist's concept illustrates a solar system that is a much younger version of our own. Dusty disks, like the one shown here circling the star, are thought to be the breeding grounds of planets, including rocky ones like Earth.
This artist's concept illustrates a solar system that is a much younger version of our own. Dusty disks, like the one shown here circling the star, are thought to be the breeding grounds of planets, including rocky ones like Earth.

Portrait of Our Dusty Past (Artist Concept)

This artist's concept illustrates a solar system that is a much younger version of our own. Dusty disks, like the one shown here circling the star, are thought to be the breeding grounds of planets, including rocky ones like Earth.

Target: IRS 46
Mission: Spitzer Space Telescope
Spacecraft: Spitzer Space Telescope
ID#: PIA03243
Added: 2005-12-20

Views: 14070

Portrait of Our Dusty Past (Artist Concept)

This artist's concept illustrates a solar system that is a much younger version of our own. Dusty disks, like the one shown here circling the star, are thought to be the breeding grounds of planets, including rocky ones like Earth.

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Newborn stars, hidden behind thick dust, are revealed in this image of a section of the Christmas Tree cluster from NASA's Spitzer Space Telescope, created in joint effort between Spitzer's infrared array camera and multiband imaging photometer instrument
Newborn stars, hidden behind thick dust, are revealed in this image of a section of the Christmas Tree cluster from NASA's Spitzer Space Telescope, created in joint effort between Spitzer's infrared array camera and multiband imaging photometer instrument

Stellar Snowflake Cluster

Newborn stars, hidden behind thick dust, are revealed in this image of a section of the Christmas Tree cluster from NASA's Spitzer Space Telescope, created in joint effort between Spitzer's infrared array camera and multiband imaging photometer instrument

Mission: Spitzer Space Telescope
Spacecraft: Spitzer Space Telescope
Instrument: Infrared Array Camera (IRAC), Multiband Imaging Photometer (MIPS)
ID#: PIA03244
Added: 2005-12-22

Views: 14025

Stellar Snowflake Cluster

Newborn stars, hidden behind thick dust, are revealed in this image of a section of the Christmas Tree cluster from NASA's Spitzer Space Telescope, created in joint effort between Spitzer's infrared array camera and multiband imaging photometer instrument

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The Helix nebula exhibits complex structure on the smallest visible scales. It is composed of gaseous shells and disks puffed out by a dying sun-like star.
The Helix nebula exhibits complex structure on the smallest visible scales. It is composed of gaseous shells and disks puffed out by a dying sun-like star.

The Infrared Helix

The Helix nebula exhibits complex structure on the smallest visible scales. It is composed of gaseous shells and disks puffed out by a dying sun-like star.

Target: Helix Nebula
Mission: Spitzer Space Telescope
Spacecraft: Spitzer Space Telescope
Instrument: Infrared Array Camera (IRAC)
ID#: PIA03294
Added: 2006-01-09

Views: 9336

The Infrared Helix

The Helix nebula exhibits complex structure on the smallest visible scales. It is composed of gaseous shells and disks puffed out by a dying sun-like star.

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From sparkling blue rings to dazzling golden disks and mined from NASA's Galaxy Evolution Explorer Survey of Nearby Galaxies data, these cosmic gems were collected with the telescope's sensitive ultraviolet instruments.
From sparkling blue rings to dazzling golden disks and mined from NASA's Galaxy Evolution Explorer Survey of Nearby Galaxies data, these cosmic gems were collected with the telescope's sensitive ultraviolet instruments.

GALEX Distributes Local Galactic Treasures at AAS

From sparkling blue rings to dazzling golden disks and mined from NASA's Galaxy Evolution Explorer Survey of Nearby Galaxies data, these cosmic gems were collected with the telescope's sensitive ultraviolet instruments.

Mission: Galaxy Evolution Explorer (GALEX)
Spacecraft: GALEX Orbiter
Instrument: GALEX Telescope
ID#: PIA03295
Added: 2006-01-09

Views: 5727

GALEX Distributes Local Galactic Treasures at AAS

From sparkling blue rings to dazzling golden disks and mined from NASA's Galaxy Evolution Explorer Survey of Nearby Galaxies data, these cosmic gems were collected with the telescope's sensitive ultraviolet instruments.

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