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The radiometer instrument on NASA's Soil Moisture Active Passive (SMAP) spacecraft captured this image of Hurricane Maria at 6:27 a.m. EDT on Sept. 19, 2017 (10:27 UTC), showing an estimated maximum surface wind speed of 126.6 miles per hour.
The radiometer instrument on NASA's Soil Moisture Active Passive (SMAP) spacecraft captured this image of Hurricane Maria at 6:27 a.m. EDT on Sept. 19, 2017 (10:27 UTC), showing an estimated maximum surface wind speed of 126.6 miles per hour.

Hurricane Maria's Strengthening Winds Seen in NASA SMAP Image

The radiometer instrument on NASA's Soil Moisture Active Passive (SMAP) spacecraft captured this image of Hurricane Maria at 6:27 a.m. EDT on Sept. 19, 2017 (10:27 UTC), showing an estimated maximum surface wind speed of 126.6 miles per hour.

Target: Earth
Mission: Soil Moisture Active Passive (SMAP)
ID#: PIA21960
Added: 2017-09-19

Views: 341

Hurricane Maria's Strengthening Winds Seen in NASA SMAP Image

The radiometer instrument on NASA's Soil Moisture Active Passive (SMAP) spacecraft captured this image of Hurricane Maria at 6:27 a.m. EDT on Sept. 19, 2017 (10:27 UTC), showing an estimated maximum surface wind speed of 126.6 miles per hour.

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Data from NASA's Soil Moisture Active Passive (SMAP) satellite have been used to create new surface flooding maps of Southeast Texas and the Tennessee Valley following Hurricane Harvey.
Data from NASA's Soil Moisture Active Passive (SMAP) satellite have been used to create new surface flooding maps of Southeast Texas and the Tennessee Valley following Hurricane Harvey.

New NASA Maps Show Flooding Changes In Aftermath of Hurricane Harvey

Data from NASA's Soil Moisture Active Passive (SMAP) satellite have been used to create new surface flooding maps of Southeast Texas and the Tennessee Valley following Hurricane Harvey.

Target: Earth
Mission: Soil Moisture Active Passive (SMAP)
ID#: PIA21951
Added: 2017-09-12

Views: 321

New NASA Maps Show Flooding Changes In Aftermath of Hurricane Harvey

Data from NASA's Soil Moisture Active Passive (SMAP) satellite have been used to create new surface flooding maps of Southeast Texas and the Tennessee Valley following Hurricane Harvey.

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This pair of images shows ocean surface wind speeds for Hurricane Irma as observed Sept. 4, 2017 (top) and 24.5 hours later at 6:02 a.m. EDT on September 5th (bottom) by the radiometer instrument on NASA's Soil Moisture Active SMAP satellite.
This pair of images shows ocean surface wind speeds for Hurricane Irma as observed Sept. 4, 2017 (top) and 24.5 hours later at 6:02 a.m. EDT on September 5th (bottom) by the radiometer instrument on NASA's Soil Moisture Active SMAP satellite.

Rapid Intensification of Hurricane Irma Seen in New SMAP Wind Images

This pair of images shows ocean surface wind speeds for Hurricane Irma as observed Sept. 4, 2017 (top) and 24.5 hours later at 6:02 a.m. EDT on September 5th (bottom) by the radiometer instrument on NASA's Soil Moisture Active SMAP satellite.

Target: Earth
Mission: Soil Moisture Active Passive (SMAP)
ID#: PIA21939
Added: 2017-09-05

Views: 853

Rapid Intensification of Hurricane Irma Seen in New SMAP Wind Images

This pair of images shows ocean surface wind speeds for Hurricane Irma as observed Sept. 4, 2017 (top) and 24.5 hours later at 6:02 a.m. EDT on September 5th (bottom) by the radiometer instrument on NASA's Soil Moisture Active SMAP satellite.

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A new series of images generated with data from NASA's Soil Moisture Active Passive (SMAP) satellite illustrate the surface flooding caused by Hurricane Harvey from before its initial landfall through August 27, 2017.
A new series of images generated with data from NASA's Soil Moisture Active Passive (SMAP) satellite illustrate the surface flooding caused by Hurricane Harvey from before its initial landfall through August 27, 2017.

Surface Flooding from Hurricane Harvey Shown in New SMAP Imagery

A new series of images generated with data from NASA's Soil Moisture Active Passive (SMAP) satellite illustrate the surface flooding caused by Hurricane Harvey from before its initial landfall through August 27, 2017.

Target: Earth
Mission: Soil Moisture Active Passive (SMAP)
ID#: PIA21930
Added: 2017-08-30

Views: 389

Surface Flooding from Hurricane Harvey Shown in New SMAP Imagery

A new series of images generated with data from NASA's Soil Moisture Active Passive (SMAP) satellite illustrate the surface flooding caused by Hurricane Harvey from before its initial landfall through August 27, 2017.

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Images of soil moisture conditions in Texas near Houston, generated by NASA's Soil Moisture Active Passive (SMAP) satellite before and after the landfall of Hurricane Harvey can be used to monitor changing ground conditions due to Harvey's rainfall.
Images of soil moisture conditions in Texas near Houston, generated by NASA's Soil Moisture Active Passive (SMAP) satellite before and after the landfall of Hurricane Harvey can be used to monitor changing ground conditions due to Harvey's rainfall.

NASA SMAP Images Show Texas Soil Moisture Conditions Before/After Hurricane Harvey's Landfall

Images of soil moisture conditions in Texas near Houston, generated by NASA's Soil Moisture Active Passive (SMAP) satellite before and after the landfall of Hurricane Harvey can be used to monitor changing ground conditions due to Harvey's rainfall.

Target: Earth
Mission: Soil Moisture Active Passive (SMAP)
ID#: PIA21926
Added: 2017-08-29

Views: 612

NASA SMAP Images Show Texas Soil Moisture Conditions Before/After Hurricane Harvey's Landfall

Images of soil moisture conditions in Texas near Houston, generated by NASA's Soil Moisture Active Passive (SMAP) satellite before and after the landfall of Hurricane Harvey can be used to monitor changing ground conditions due to Harvey's rainfall.

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The rapid intensification of Hurricane Harvey is seen in this pair of images of ocean surface wind speeds as observed by the radiometer instrument aboard NASA's SMAP satellite at 7:29 a.m. Aug. 24th, 2017 (left) and at 7 p.m. Aug. 25th (right).
The rapid intensification of Hurricane Harvey is seen in this pair of images of ocean surface wind speeds as observed by the radiometer instrument aboard NASA's SMAP satellite at 7:29 a.m. Aug. 24th, 2017 (left) and at 7 p.m. Aug. 25th (right).

Hurricane Harvey's Rapid Wind Intensification seen by NASA's SMAP

The rapid intensification of Hurricane Harvey is seen in this pair of images of ocean surface wind speeds as observed by the radiometer instrument aboard NASA's SMAP satellite at 7:29 a.m. Aug. 24th, 2017 (left) and at 7 p.m. Aug. 25th (right).

Target: Earth
Mission: Soil Moisture Active Passive (SMAP)
ID#: PIA21884
Added: 2017-08-28

Views: 264

Hurricane Harvey's Rapid Wind Intensification seen by NASA's SMAP

The rapid intensification of Hurricane Harvey is seen in this pair of images of ocean surface wind speeds as observed by the radiometer instrument aboard NASA's SMAP satellite at 7:29 a.m. Aug. 24th, 2017 (left) and at 7 p.m. Aug. 25th (right).

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NASA's SMAP radiometer instrument measured Hurricane Matthew's wind speeds at 4:52 a.m. PDT (7:52 a.m. EDT) at up to 132 miles per hour (59 meters per second).
NASA's SMAP radiometer instrument measured Hurricane Matthew's wind speeds at 4:52 a.m. PDT (7:52 a.m. EDT) at up to 132 miles per hour (59 meters per second).

SMAP Takes a New Measure of Hurricane Matthew's Winds

NASA's SMAP radiometer instrument measured Hurricane Matthew's wind speeds at 4:52 a.m. PDT (7:52 a.m. EDT) at up to 132 miles per hour (59 meters per second).

Target: Earth
Mission: Soil Moisture Active Passive (SMAP)
ID#: PIA21096
Added: 2016-10-07

Views: 699

SMAP Takes a New Measure of Hurricane Matthew's Winds

NASA's SMAP radiometer instrument measured Hurricane Matthew's wind speeds at 4:52 a.m. PDT (7:52 a.m. EDT) at up to 132 miles per hour (59 meters per second).

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Surface soil moisture in the Southeastern United States as retrieved from NASA's SMAP satellite observatory at around 6 a.m. on Oct. 5, 2015. Large parts of South Carolina appear blue, representing the impact of heavy localized rains and flooding.
Surface soil moisture in the Southeastern United States as retrieved from NASA's SMAP satellite observatory at around 6 a.m. on Oct. 5, 2015. Large parts of South Carolina appear blue, representing the impact of heavy localized rains and flooding.

Devastating Carolina Floods Viewed by NASA's SMAP

Surface soil moisture in the Southeastern United States as retrieved from NASA's SMAP satellite observatory at around 6 a.m. on Oct. 5, 2015. Large parts of South Carolina appear blue, representing the impact of heavy localized rains and flooding.

Target: Earth
Mission: Soil Moisture Active Passive (SMAP)
ID#: PIA20001
Added: 2015-10-08

Views: 2741

Devastating Carolina Floods Viewed by NASA's SMAP

Surface soil moisture in the Southeastern United States as retrieved from NASA's SMAP satellite observatory at around 6 a.m. on Oct. 5, 2015. Large parts of South Carolina appear blue, representing the impact of heavy localized rains and flooding.

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This figure shows the longitude-time variations, averaged between 21 and 22 degrees North, across the middle of the India subcontinent from mid-April to mid-June in a deadly heat wave in India that killed more than 2,300 people.
This figure shows the longitude-time variations, averaged between 21 and 22 degrees North, across the middle of the India subcontinent from mid-April to mid-June in a deadly heat wave in India that killed more than 2,300 people.

Pre-Monsoon Drought and Heat Waves in India

This figure shows the longitude-time variations, averaged between 21 and 22 degrees North, across the middle of the India subcontinent from mid-April to mid-June in a deadly heat wave in India that killed more than 2,300 people.

Target: Earth
Mission: Aqua, Aquarius, Soil Moisture Active Passive (SMAP)
ID#: PIA19938
Added: 2015-09-11

Views: 1500

Pre-Monsoon Drought and Heat Waves in India

This figure shows the longitude-time variations, averaged between 21 and 22 degrees North, across the middle of the India subcontinent from mid-April to mid-June in a deadly heat wave in India that killed more than 2,300 people.

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NASA's SMAP (Soil Moisture Active Passive) satellite observatory conducted a field experiment as part of its soil moisture data product validation program in southern Arizona on Aug. 2-18, 2015.
NASA's SMAP (Soil Moisture Active Passive) satellite observatory conducted a field experiment as part of its soil moisture data product validation program in southern Arizona on Aug. 2-18, 2015.

NASA's SMAPVEX 15 Field Campaign Measures Soil Moisture Over Arizona

NASA's SMAP (Soil Moisture Active Passive) satellite observatory conducted a field experiment as part of its soil moisture data product validation program in southern Arizona on Aug. 2-18, 2015.

Target: Earth
Mission: Soil Moisture Active Passive (SMAP)
Instrument: Passive Active L-band System
ID#: PIA19879
Added: 2015-09-09

Views: 2049

NASA's SMAPVEX 15 Field Campaign Measures Soil Moisture Over Arizona

NASA's SMAP (Soil Moisture Active Passive) satellite observatory conducted a field experiment as part of its soil moisture data product validation program in southern Arizona on Aug. 2-18, 2015.

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A three-day composite global map of surface soil moisture as retrieved from NASA's SMAP's radiometer instrument between Aug. 25-27, 2015. Dry areas appear yellow/orange, such as the Sahara Desert, western Australia and the western U.S.
A three-day composite global map of surface soil moisture as retrieved from NASA's SMAP's radiometer instrument between Aug. 25-27, 2015. Dry areas appear yellow/orange, such as the Sahara Desert, western Australia and the western U.S.

SMAP Global Map of Surface Soil Moisture (Aug. 25-27, 2015)

A three-day composite global map of surface soil moisture as retrieved from NASA's SMAP's radiometer instrument between Aug. 25-27, 2015. Dry areas appear yellow/orange, such as the Sahara Desert, western Australia and the western U.S.

Target: Earth
Mission: Soil Moisture Active Passive (SMAP)
ID#: PIA19877
Added: 2015-09-02

Views: 1837

SMAP Global Map of Surface Soil Moisture (Aug. 25-27, 2015)

A three-day composite global map of surface soil moisture as retrieved from NASA's SMAP's radiometer instrument between Aug. 25-27, 2015. Dry areas appear yellow/orange, such as the Sahara Desert, western Australia and the western U.S.

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Southern U.S. SMAP soil moisture retrievals from April 27, 2015, when severe storms were affecting Texas.
Southern U.S. SMAP soil moisture retrievals from April 27, 2015, when severe storms were affecting Texas.

Southern U.S. Soil Moisture Map

Southern U.S. SMAP soil moisture retrievals from April 27, 2015, when severe storms were affecting Texas.

Target: Earth
Mission: Soil Moisture Active Passive (SMAP)
ID#: PIA19338
Added: 2015-05-19

Views: 2402

Southern U.S. Soil Moisture Map

Southern U.S. SMAP soil moisture retrievals from April 27, 2015, when severe storms were affecting Texas.

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High-resolution global soil moisture map from NASA SMAP's combined radar and radiometer instruments, acquired between May 4 and May 11, 2015 during SMAP's commissioning phase.
High-resolution global soil moisture map from NASA SMAP's combined radar and radiometer instruments, acquired between May 4 and May 11, 2015 during SMAP's commissioning phase.

High-Resolution Global Soil Moisture Map

High-resolution global soil moisture map from NASA SMAP's combined radar and radiometer instruments, acquired between May 4 and May 11, 2015 during SMAP's commissioning phase.

Target: Earth
Mission: Soil Moisture Active Passive (SMAP)
ID#: PIA19337
Added: 2015-05-19

Views: 5494

High-Resolution Global Soil Moisture Map

High-resolution global soil moisture map from NASA SMAP's combined radar and radiometer instruments, acquired between May 4 and May 11, 2015 during SMAP's commissioning phase.

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These maps of global soil moisture were created using data from the radiometer instrument on NASA's Soil Moisture Active Passive (SMAP) observatory. Evident are regions of increased soil moisture and flooding during April, 2015.
These maps of global soil moisture were created using data from the radiometer instrument on NASA's Soil Moisture Active Passive (SMAP) observatory. Evident are regions of increased soil moisture and flooding during April, 2015.

SMAP's Radiometer Captures Views of Global Soil Moisture

These maps of global soil moisture were created using data from the radiometer instrument on NASA's Soil Moisture Active Passive (SMAP) observatory. Evident are regions of increased soil moisture and flooding during April, 2015.

Target: Earth
Mission: Soil Moisture Active Passive (SMAP)
ID#: PIA17798
Added: 2015-05-06

Views: 1372

SMAP's Radiometer Captures Views of Global Soil Moisture

These maps of global soil moisture were created using data from the radiometer instrument on NASA's Soil Moisture Active Passive (SMAP) observatory. Evident are regions of increased soil moisture and flooding during April, 2015.

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The radar measurements made by NASA's Soil Moisture Active Passive (SMAP) observatory are sensitive to whether land surfaces are frozen or thawed.
The radar measurements made by NASA's Soil Moisture Active Passive (SMAP) observatory are sensitive to whether land surfaces are frozen or thawed.

NASA SMAP Images Show Progression of Spring Thaw in Northern Hemisphere

The radar measurements made by NASA's Soil Moisture Active Passive (SMAP) observatory are sensitive to whether land surfaces are frozen or thawed.

Target: Earth
Mission: Soil Moisture Active Passive (SMAP)
ID#: PIA11399
Added: 2015-04-29

Views: 4146

NASA SMAP Images Show Progression of Spring Thaw in Northern Hemisphere

The radar measurements made by NASA's Soil Moisture Active Passive (SMAP) observatory are sensitive to whether land surfaces are frozen or thawed.

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With its antenna now spinning at full speed, NASA's new Soil Moisture Active Passive (SMAP) observatory has successfully re-tested its science instruments and generated its first global maps.
With its antenna now spinning at full speed, NASA's new Soil Moisture Active Passive (SMAP) observatory has successfully re-tested its science instruments and generated its first global maps.

NASA Soil Moisture Mission Produces First Global Radar Map

With its antenna now spinning at full speed, NASA's new Soil Moisture Active Passive (SMAP) observatory has successfully re-tested its science instruments and generated its first global maps.

Target: Earth
Mission: Soil Moisture Active Passive (SMAP)
ID#: PIA18058
Added: 2015-04-21

Views: 5614

NASA Soil Moisture Mission Produces First Global Radar Map

With its antenna now spinning at full speed, NASA's new Soil Moisture Active Passive (SMAP) observatory has successfully re-tested its science instruments and generated its first global maps.

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With its antenna now spinning at full speed, NASA's new Soil Moisture Active Passive (SMAP) observatory has successfully re-tested its science instruments and generated its first global maps, a key step to beginning routine science operations in May, 2015
With its antenna now spinning at full speed, NASA's new Soil Moisture Active Passive (SMAP) observatory has successfully re-tested its science instruments and generated its first global maps, a key step to beginning routine science operations in May, 2015

NASA Soil Moisture Mission Produces First Global Radiometer Map

With its antenna now spinning at full speed, NASA's new Soil Moisture Active Passive (SMAP) observatory has successfully re-tested its science instruments and generated its first global maps, a key step to beginning routine science operations in May, 2015

Target: Earth
Mission: Soil Moisture Active Passive (SMAP)
ID#: PIA18057
Added: 2015-04-21

Views: 4509

NASA Soil Moisture Mission Produces First Global Radiometer Map

With its antenna now spinning at full speed, NASA's new Soil Moisture Active Passive (SMAP) observatory has successfully re-tested its science instruments and generated its first global maps, a key step to beginning routine science operations in May, 2015

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Fresh off the recent successful deployment of its 20-foot (6-meter) reflector antenna and associated boom arm, NASA's SMAP observatory has successfully completed a two-day test of its science instruments.
Fresh off the recent successful deployment of its 20-foot (6-meter) reflector antenna and associated boom arm, NASA's SMAP observatory has successfully completed a two-day test of its science instruments.

NASA's Soil Moisture Mapper Takes First 'SMAPshots'

Fresh off the recent successful deployment of its 20-foot (6-meter) reflector antenna and associated boom arm, NASA's SMAP observatory has successfully completed a two-day test of its science instruments.

Target: Earth
Mission: Soil Moisture Active Passive (SMAP)
ID#: PIA19236
Added: 2015-03-09

Views: 1223

NASA's Soil Moisture Mapper Takes First 'SMAPshots'

Fresh off the recent successful deployment of its 20-foot (6-meter) reflector antenna and associated boom arm, NASA's SMAP observatory has successfully completed a two-day test of its science instruments.

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The sun sets behind Space Launch Complex 2, Vandenberg Air Force Base, California, where NASA's Soil Moisture Active Passive (SMAP) mission satellite is being prepared for liftoff. Launch is scheduled for Jan. 29.
The sun sets behind Space Launch Complex 2, Vandenberg Air Force Base, California, where NASA's Soil Moisture Active Passive (SMAP) mission satellite is being prepared for liftoff. Launch is scheduled for Jan. 29.

Sunset at Vandenberg

The sun sets behind Space Launch Complex 2, Vandenberg Air Force Base, California, where NASA's Soil Moisture Active Passive (SMAP) mission satellite is being prepared for liftoff. Launch is scheduled for Jan. 29.

Target: Earth
Mission: Soil Moisture Active Passive (SMAP)
ID#: PIA19137
Added: 2015-01-21

Views: 2235

Sunset at Vandenberg

The sun sets behind Space Launch Complex 2, Vandenberg Air Force Base, California, where NASA's Soil Moisture Active Passive (SMAP) mission satellite is being prepared for liftoff. Launch is scheduled for Jan. 29.

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At Space Launch Complex 2 on Vandenberg Air Force Base in California, NASA's Soil Moisture Active Passive (SMAP) mission satellite is lifted up the side of a mobile service tower for mating to its Delta II rocket.
At Space Launch Complex 2 on Vandenberg Air Force Base in California, NASA's Soil Moisture Active Passive (SMAP) mission satellite is lifted up the side of a mobile service tower for mating to its Delta II rocket.

Going Up

At Space Launch Complex 2 on Vandenberg Air Force Base in California, NASA's Soil Moisture Active Passive (SMAP) mission satellite is lifted up the side of a mobile service tower for mating to its Delta II rocket.

Target: Earth
Mission: Soil Moisture Active Passive (SMAP)
ID#: PIA19136
Added: 2015-01-21

Views: 1634

Going Up

At Space Launch Complex 2 on Vandenberg Air Force Base in California, NASA's Soil Moisture Active Passive (SMAP) mission satellite is lifted up the side of a mobile service tower for mating to its Delta II rocket.

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NASA's Soil Moisture Active Passive (SMAP) satellite is transported across Vandenberg Air Force Base in California to Space Launch Complex 2, where it will be mated to a Delta II rocket for launch, targeted for Jan. 29.
NASA's Soil Moisture Active Passive (SMAP) satellite is transported across Vandenberg Air Force Base in California to Space Launch Complex 2, where it will be mated to a Delta II rocket for launch, targeted for Jan. 29.

Satellite in a Can

NASA's Soil Moisture Active Passive (SMAP) satellite is transported across Vandenberg Air Force Base in California to Space Launch Complex 2, where it will be mated to a Delta II rocket for launch, targeted for Jan. 29.

Target: Earth
Mission: Soil Moisture Active Passive (SMAP)
ID#: PIA19135
Added: 2015-01-21

Views: 1905

Satellite in a Can

NASA's Soil Moisture Active Passive (SMAP) satellite is transported across Vandenberg Air Force Base in California to Space Launch Complex 2, where it will be mated to a Delta II rocket for launch, targeted for Jan. 29.

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In the Astrotech payload processing facility on Vandenberg Air Force Base in California, technicians secure a transportation canister around NASA's Soil Moisture Active Passive (SMAP) spacecraft for its move to the launch pad.
In the Astrotech payload processing facility on Vandenberg Air Force Base in California, technicians secure a transportation canister around NASA's Soil Moisture Active Passive (SMAP) spacecraft for its move to the launch pad.

SMAP Gets Ready to Move

In the Astrotech payload processing facility on Vandenberg Air Force Base in California, technicians secure a transportation canister around NASA's Soil Moisture Active Passive (SMAP) spacecraft for its move to the launch pad.

Target: Earth
Mission: Soil Moisture Active Passive (SMAP)
ID#: PIA19134
Added: 2015-01-21

Views: 1316

SMAP Gets Ready to Move

In the Astrotech payload processing facility on Vandenberg Air Force Base in California, technicians secure a transportation canister around NASA's Soil Moisture Active Passive (SMAP) spacecraft for its move to the launch pad.

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Artist's rendering of the Soil Moisture Active Passive (SMAP) satellite. The width of the region scanned on Earth's surface during each orbit is about 620 miles (1,000 kilometers).
Artist's rendering of the Soil Moisture Active Passive (SMAP) satellite. The width of the region scanned on Earth's surface during each orbit is about 620 miles (1,000 kilometers).

Soil Moisture Active Passive Satellite

Artist's rendering of the Soil Moisture Active Passive (SMAP) satellite. The width of the region scanned on Earth's surface during each orbit is about 620 miles (1,000 kilometers).

Target: Earth
Mission: Soil Moisture Active Passive (SMAP)
ID#: PIA19133
Added: 2015-01-21

Views: 2837

Soil Moisture Active Passive Satellite

Artist's rendering of the Soil Moisture Active Passive (SMAP) satellite. The width of the region scanned on Earth's surface during each orbit is about 620 miles (1,000 kilometers).

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NASA's Soil Moisture Active Passive spacecraft is lowered onto the Delta II payload attach structure in the Astrotech payload processing facility at Vandenberg Air Force Base, California, in preparation for launch, to take place no sooner than Jan. 29.
NASA's Soil Moisture Active Passive spacecraft is lowered onto the Delta II payload attach structure in the Astrotech payload processing facility at Vandenberg Air Force Base, California, in preparation for launch, to take place no sooner than Jan. 29.

NASA's SMAP is Readied for Launch

NASA's Soil Moisture Active Passive spacecraft is lowered onto the Delta II payload attach structure in the Astrotech payload processing facility at Vandenberg Air Force Base, California, in preparation for launch, to take place no sooner than Jan. 29.

Target: Earth
Mission: Soil Moisture Active Passive (SMAP)
ID#: PIA19132
Added: 2015-01-20

Views: 1401

NASA's SMAP is Readied for Launch

NASA's Soil Moisture Active Passive spacecraft is lowered onto the Delta II payload attach structure in the Astrotech payload processing facility at Vandenberg Air Force Base, California, in preparation for launch, to take place no sooner than Jan. 29.

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NASA's Soil Moisture Active Passive (SMAP) spacecraft is slowly lowered into place in the Spacecraft Assembly Facility at NASA's Jet Propulsion Laboratory, Pasadena, California.
NASA's Soil Moisture Active Passive (SMAP) spacecraft is slowly lowered into place in the Spacecraft Assembly Facility at NASA's Jet Propulsion Laboratory, Pasadena, California.

NASA's Soil Moisture Active Passive (SMAP) Lowered into Place

NASA's Soil Moisture Active Passive (SMAP) spacecraft is slowly lowered into place in the Spacecraft Assembly Facility at NASA's Jet Propulsion Laboratory, Pasadena, California.

Mission: Soil Moisture Active Passive (SMAP)
ID#: PIA18828
Added: 2014-10-15

Views: 2636

NASA's Soil Moisture Active Passive (SMAP) Lowered into Place

NASA's Soil Moisture Active Passive (SMAP) spacecraft is slowly lowered into place in the Spacecraft Assembly Facility at NASA's Jet Propulsion Laboratory, Pasadena, California.

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