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This photo from NASA's Voyager 2 was taken on Jun. 9, 1979 and is centered over the long-lived disturbed region west of the Great Red Spot (GRS).
This photo from NASA's Voyager 2 was taken on Jun. 9, 1979 and is centered over the long-lived disturbed region west of the Great Red Spot (GRS).

Disturbed Region West of the Great Red Spot

This photo from NASA's Voyager 2 was taken on Jun. 9, 1979 and is centered over the long-lived disturbed region west of the Great Red Spot (GRS).

Target: Jupiter
Mission: Voyager
Spacecraft: Imaging Science Subsystem - Narrow Angle
Instrument: Voyager 2
ID#: PIA01519
Added: 1999-03-13

Views: 6060

Disturbed Region West of the Great Red Spot

This photo from NASA's Voyager 2 was taken on Jun. 9, 1979 and is centered over the long-lived disturbed region west of the Great Red Spot (GRS).

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NASA's Voyager 2 obtained this wide-angle image of the night side of Titan on Aug. 25, 1979. This is a view of Titan's extended atmosphere. the bright orangish ring being caused by the atmosphere's scattering of the incident sunlight.
NASA's Voyager 2 obtained this wide-angle image of the night side of Titan on Aug. 25, 1979. This is a view of Titan's extended atmosphere. the bright orangish ring being caused by the atmosphere's scattering of the incident sunlight.

Night side of Titan

NASA's Voyager 2 obtained this wide-angle image of the night side of Titan on Aug. 25, 1979. This is a view of Titan's extended atmosphere. the bright orangish ring being caused by the atmosphere's scattering of the incident sunlight.

Target: Titan
Mission: Voyager
Spacecraft: Imaging Science Subsystem - Wide Angle
Instrument: Voyager 2
ID#: PIA01393
Added: 1999-02-22

Views: 5219

Night side of Titan

NASA's Voyager 2 obtained this wide-angle image of the night side of Titan on Aug. 25, 1979. This is a view of Titan's extended atmosphere. the bright orangish ring being caused by the atmosphere's scattering of the incident sunlight.

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This view shows some detail and differences in the complex system of rings. This was one of the first pictures obtained once NASA's Voyager 2 resumed returning images Aug. 29, 1979 after its scan platform was commanded to view Saturn.
This view shows some detail and differences in the complex system of rings. This was one of the first pictures obtained once NASA's Voyager 2 resumed returning images Aug. 29, 1979 after its scan platform was commanded to view Saturn.

View of Saturn's Rings

This view shows some detail and differences in the complex system of rings. This was one of the first pictures obtained once NASA's Voyager 2 resumed returning images Aug. 29, 1979 after its scan platform was commanded to view Saturn.

Target: S Rings
Mission: Voyager
Spacecraft: Imaging Science Subsystem - Narrow Angle
Instrument: Voyager 2
ID#: PIA01389
Added: 1999-01-18

Views: 5296

View of Saturn's Rings

This view shows some detail and differences in the complex system of rings. This was one of the first pictures obtained once NASA's Voyager 2 resumed returning images Aug. 29, 1979 after its scan platform was commanded to view Saturn.

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Saturn storms observed by NASA's Voyager, Aug. 5, 2004. Voyager 1 and 2 observed radio signals from lightning which were interpreted as being from a persistent, low-latitude storm system.
Saturn storms observed by NASA's Voyager, Aug. 5, 2004. Voyager 1 and 2 observed radio signals from lightning which were interpreted as being from a persistent, low-latitude storm system.

Saturn taken from Voyager 2

Saturn storms observed by NASA's Voyager, Aug. 5, 2004. Voyager 1 and 2 observed radio signals from lightning which were interpreted as being from a persistent, low-latitude storm system.

Target: Saturn
Mission: Voyager
Spacecraft: Imaging Science Subsystem - Narrow Angle
Instrument: Voyager 2
ID#: PIA01364
Added: 1998-12-05

Views: 10237

Saturn taken from Voyager 2

Saturn storms observed by NASA's Voyager, Aug. 5, 2004. Voyager 1 and 2 observed radio signals from lightning which were interpreted as being from a persistent, low-latitude storm system.

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A vortex, or large atmospheric storm, is visible in this color composite of NASA's Voyager 2 Saturn images obtained Aug. 25, 1979 from a range of 1 million kilometers (620,000 miles).
A vortex, or large atmospheric storm, is visible in this color composite of NASA's Voyager 2 Saturn images obtained Aug. 25, 1979 from a range of 1 million kilometers (620,000 miles).

Saturnian Atmospheric Storm

A vortex, or large atmospheric storm, is visible in this color composite of NASA's Voyager 2 Saturn images obtained Aug. 25, 1979 from a range of 1 million kilometers (620,000 miles).

Target: Saturn
Mission: Voyager
Spacecraft: Imaging Science Subsystem - Wide Angle
Instrument: Voyager 2
ID#: PIA01379
Added: 1998-11-16

Views: 4734

Saturnian Atmospheric Storm

A vortex, or large atmospheric storm, is visible in this color composite of NASA's Voyager 2 Saturn images obtained Aug. 25, 1979 from a range of 1 million kilometers (620,000 miles).

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Possible variations in chemical composition from one part of Saturn's ring system to another are visible from Voyager 2.
Possible variations in chemical composition from one part of Saturn's ring system to another are visible from Voyager 2.

Composition Differences within Saturn's Rings

Possible variations in chemical composition from one part of Saturn's ring system to another are visible from Voyager 2.

Target: S Rings
Mission: Voyager
Spacecraft: Imaging Science Subsystem
Instrument: Voyager 2
ID#: PIA01486
Added: 1998-10-30

Views: 13671

Composition Differences within Saturn's Rings

Possible variations in chemical composition from one part of Saturn's ring system to another are visible from Voyager 2.

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NASA's Voyager 2 was launched on Aug. 20, 1977 from the NASA Kennedy Space Center at Cape Canaveral in Florida where it was propelled into space on a Titan/Centaur rocket.
NASA's Voyager 2 was launched on Aug. 20, 1977 from the NASA Kennedy Space Center at Cape Canaveral in Florida where it was propelled into space on a Titan/Centaur rocket.

Voyager 2 Launch

NASA's Voyager 2 was launched on Aug. 20, 1977 from the NASA Kennedy Space Center at Cape Canaveral in Florida where it was propelled into space on a Titan/Centaur rocket.

Target: Earth
Mission: Voyager
Spacecraft: Imaging Science Subsystem
Instrument: Voyager 2
ID#: PIA01480
Added: 1998-10-30

Views: 12074

Voyager 2 Launch

NASA's Voyager 2 was launched on Aug. 20, 1977 from the NASA Kennedy Space Center at Cape Canaveral in Florida where it was propelled into space on a Titan/Centaur rocket.

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Saturn's outermost large moon, Iapetus, has a bright, heavily cratered icy terrain and a dark terrain, as shown in this NASA Voyager 2 image taken on Aug. 22, 1981.
Saturn's outermost large moon, Iapetus, has a bright, heavily cratered icy terrain and a dark terrain, as shown in this NASA Voyager 2 image taken on Aug. 22, 1981.

Iapetus Bright and Dark Terrains

Saturn's outermost large moon, Iapetus, has a bright, heavily cratered icy terrain and a dark terrain, as shown in this NASA Voyager 2 image taken on Aug. 22, 1981.

Target: Iapetus
Mission: Voyager
Spacecraft: Imaging Science Subsystem - Narrow Angle
Instrument: Voyager 2
ID#: PIA00348
Added: 1998-06-04

Views: 5639

Iapetus Bright and Dark Terrains

Saturn's outermost large moon, Iapetus, has a bright, heavily cratered icy terrain and a dark terrain, as shown in this NASA Voyager 2 image taken on Aug. 22, 1981.

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This archival image taken by NASA's Voyager 2, is of Europa, the smallest Galilean satellite. The bright areas are probably ice deposits, whereas the darkened areas may be the rocky surface or areas with a more patchy distribution of ice.
This archival image taken by NASA's Voyager 2, is of Europa, the smallest Galilean satellite. The bright areas are probably ice deposits, whereas the darkened areas may be the rocky surface or areas with a more patchy distribution of ice.

Europa Crescent

This archival image taken by NASA's Voyager 2, is of Europa, the smallest Galilean satellite. The bright areas are probably ice deposits, whereas the darkened areas may be the rocky surface or areas with a more patchy distribution of ice.

Target: Europa
Mission: Voyager
Spacecraft: Imaging Science Subsystem
Instrument: Voyager 2
ID#: PIA00325
Added: 1998-06-04

Views: 5023

Europa Crescent

This archival image taken by NASA's Voyager 2, is of Europa, the smallest Galilean satellite. The bright areas are probably ice deposits, whereas the darkened areas may be the rocky surface or areas with a more patchy distribution of ice.

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This color image of the Jovian moon Europa was acquired by NASA's Voyager 2 during its close encounter on Jul. 9, 1979. Europa, the size of our moon, is thought to have a crust of ice perhaps 100 kilometers thick which overlies the silicate crust.
This color image of the Jovian moon Europa was acquired by NASA's Voyager 2 during its close encounter on Jul. 9, 1979. Europa, the size of our moon, is thought to have a crust of ice perhaps 100 kilometers thick which overlies the silicate crust.

Europa During Voyager 2 Closest Approach

This color image of the Jovian moon Europa was acquired by NASA's Voyager 2 during its close encounter on Jul. 9, 1979. Europa, the size of our moon, is thought to have a crust of ice perhaps 100 kilometers thick which overlies the silicate crust.

Target: Europa
Mission: Voyager
Spacecraft: Imaging Science Subsystem - Narrow Angle
Instrument: Voyager 2
ID#: PIA00459
Added: 1996-09-26

Views: 15387

Europa During Voyager 2 Closest Approach

This color image of the Jovian moon Europa was acquired by NASA's Voyager 2 during its close encounter on Jul. 9, 1979. Europa, the size of our moon, is thought to have a crust of ice perhaps 100 kilometers thick which overlies the silicate crust.

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NASA's Voyager 2 took this 'true color' photograph of Saturn on July 21, 1981. The moons Rhea and Dione appear as blue dots to the south and southeast of Saturn, respectively.
NASA's Voyager 2 took this 'true color' photograph of Saturn on July 21, 1981. The moons Rhea and Dione appear as blue dots to the south and southeast of Saturn, respectively.

Saturn With Rhea and Dione (true color)

NASA's Voyager 2 took this 'true color' photograph of Saturn on July 21, 1981. The moons Rhea and Dione appear as blue dots to the south and southeast of Saturn, respectively.

Target: Saturn
Mission: Voyager
Spacecraft: Imaging Science Subsystem
Instrument: Voyager 2
ID#: PIA00030
Added: 1996-01-29

Views: 12942

Saturn With Rhea and Dione (true color)

NASA's Voyager 2 took this 'true color' photograph of Saturn on July 21, 1981. The moons Rhea and Dione appear as blue dots to the south and southeast of Saturn, respectively.

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