Impact craters expose the subsurface materials on steep slopes in this image observed by NASA's Mars Reconnaissance Orbiter.

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Impact craters expose the subsurface materials on steep slopes. However, these slopes often experience rockfalls and debris avalanches that keep the surface clean of dust, revealing a variety of hues, like in this enhanced-color image, representing different rock types. The bright reddish material at the top of the crater rim is from a coating of the Martian dust.

The long streamers of material are from downslope movements. Also revealed in this slope are a variety of bedrock textures, with a mix of layered and jumbled deposits. This sample is typical of the Martian highlands, with lava flows and water-lain materials depositing layers, then broken up and jumbled by many impact events.

(Note: North is approximately down in the cutout and above image).

This is a stereo pair with ESP_021454_1550.

The University of Arizona, Tucson, operates HiRISE, which was built by Ball Aerospace & Technologies Corp., Boulder, Colo. NASA's Jet Propulsion Laboratory, a division of Caltech in Pasadena, California, manages the Mars Reconnaissance Orbiter Project for NASA's Science Mission Directorate, Washington.

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