Technicians install components that will aid with guidance, navigation and control of NASA's Juno spacecraft.

Technicians install components that will aid with guidance, navigation and control of NASA's Juno spacecraft. Like most of Juno's sensitive electronics, these components are situated within the spacecraft's titanium radiation vault. With these components in place, the spacecraft was prepared for tests intended to confirm that its software and electrical systems functioned properly as a whole.

Here, the spacecraft is mounted on a large rotation fixture which allows the spacecraft to be turned for convenient access for integration and testing of various subsystems.

This image was taken on June 29, 2010, in the high-bay cleanroom at Lockheed Martin Space Systems in Denver, during Juno's assembly process.

Juno aims to understand the origin and evolution of Jupiter.

NASA's Jet Propulsion Laboratory, Pasadena, Calif., manages the Juno mission for the principal investigator, Scott Bolton, of Southwest Research Institute at San Antonio, Texas. Lockheed Martin Space Systems, Denver, is building the spacecraft. The Italian Space Agency in Rome is contributing an infrared spectrometer instrument and a portion of the radio science experiment. JPL is a division of the California Institute of Technology in Pasadena.

For more information about Juno, visit http://www.nasa.gov/juno.

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