NASA's Galileo spacecraft obtained this image on September 6, 1996 showing this area of dark terrain on Jupiter's moon Ganymede lies near a transitional area between dark and bright terrain.

This area of dark terrain on Jupiter's moon Ganymede lies near a transitional area between dark and bright terrain. The dark surface is cut by a pervasive network of fractures, which range in width from the limit of resolution up to 2.2 kilometers (1.4 miles). Bright material is exposed in the walls of the chasms, and dark material fills the troughs. The impurities which darken the ice on the surface of dark terrain may be only a thin veneer over a brighter ice crust. Over time, these materials may be shed down steep slopes, where they collect in low areas. The image is 68 by 54 kilometers (42 by 33 miles), and has a resolution of 190 meters (623 feet) per picture element (pixel). North is to the top. This image was obtained on September 6, 1996 by the Solid State Imaging (CCD) system aboard NASA's Galileo spacecraft.

The Jet Propulsion Laboratory, Pasadena, CA manages the Galileo mission for NASA's Office of Space Science, Washington, DC. JPL is an operating division of California Institute of Technology (Caltech).

This image and other images and data received from Galileo are posted on the World Wide Web, on the Galileo mission home page at URL http://galileo.jpl.nasa.gov. Background information and educational context for the images can be found at http://www.jpl.nasa.gov/galileo/sepo.

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