The Jason-3 spacecraft is unloaded from a 747 transport aircraft at Vandenberg Air Force Base, California, on June 18, 2015
The Jason-3 spacecraft is unloaded from a 747 transport aircraft at Vandenberg Air Force Base, California, on June 18, 2015, concluding a journey from the Thales Alenia Space manufacturing facility in France. The Jason-3 satellite altimetry mission is scheduled to launch this August. Image Credit: NASA
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The Jason-3 satellite arrived today at California's Vandenberg Air Force Base, after a journey from France, in preparation for launch Aug. 8, 2015, aboard a SpaceX Falcon 9 rocket.

Jason-3 will continue a 23-year effort to monitor Earth's global ocean, tracking sea level rise, ocean heat content and sea-surface height. Additionally, Jason-3 data will help the National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration accurately predict when tropical cyclones will intensify.

Jason-3 is an international partnership led by NOAA with participation from NASA, France's Centre Nationale d'Etudes Spatiales (the French space agency) and EUMETSAT, the European Organisation for the Exploitation of Meteorological Satellites. NASA's Jet Propulsion Laboratory, Pasadena, California, built Jason-3's radiometer, GPS and laser reflector and is funding the launch. JPL will also help oversee the science team, which is responsible for ensuring the quality of the data.

For more about NASA's ocean surface altimetry missions, visit:

https://sealevel.jpl.nasa.gov/

NASA uses the vantage point of space to increase our understanding of our home planet, improve lives and safeguard our future. NASA develops new ways to observe and study Earth's interconnected natural systems with long-term data records. The agency freely shares this unique knowledge and works with institutions around the world to gain new insights into how our planet is changing.

For more information about NASA's Earth science activities, visit:

http://www.nasa.gov/earth


News Media Contact

Alan Buis
Jet Propulsion Laboratory, Pasadena, California
818-354-0474
Alan.Buis@jpl.nasa.gov

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