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What's your favorite NASA space image and why?
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Sophia Sheth

"A Voyage to the Moon (a poem by Sophia Sheth - Grade 5 American School of Bombay - March 2019): Once upon a mission, in 1969, there was an expedition above the skies, took a place in space for the Moon to face. From the thermosphere to the exosphere, a long way from the ground, a full speed -"10987654321" BLASTOFF of six million pounds. With Saturn Five released, Eagle and Columbia now detach with ease. Michael Collins, controlling the Eagle for a safe landing, Neil Armstrong and Buzz Aldrin, in charge of Columbia, for safe flying… COPY THAT. Three days from July 16, there was the first mission to the moon ever been. Buzz and Neil, stepped on the moon, while Michael stayed back in retreat. This was real. Facing 238,900 miles east, gazing upon the ball of green and blue. This was true. Looking at the gray, punctured ground, no life, no land, no light or sound. No family, friends, no one around. It’s like the darkness sucks you into the inner core. Yet Earth’s orbiting satellite is worth to explore. This voyage was never taken before..."

Sophia Sheth

May 3, 2019 | 1:23 p.m

CJ

"The view of Saturn from the Earth courtesy of the Hubble Space Telescope. This view reminds me of when I was a child and I had my first view through a telescope. It was at a public observing session at Lick Observatory, in California. The view of Saturn was stunning and mesmerizing. I must have been barely six or seven years old when that happened, but it was a moment that had an influence on my life. It began a lifelong interest in science (especially astronomy), nature and the night sky."

CJ

May 3, 2019 | 1:22 p.m

Mariana Pelypenko, 13 years old

"This photo reminds me of the catastrophe of launching the Space Shuttle Challenger and motivates to become someone bigger and do my favorite thing, that is, space."

Mariana Pelypenko, 13 years old

February 22, 2019 | 4:16 p.m

Adrian, 5th grade

"I think that this image is showing our Earth in thermal vision and it is showing how hot or how cold it will be. Up on top of the Earth, it is near the mid-10s. In the south pole, it is very cold on the bottom of the Earth. It is about the same temperature as the North Pole."

Adrian, 5th grade

February 22, 2019 | 4:15 p.m

David (5th grade, Fontana, CA)

"I like this picture because it shows how far space exploration has gone from landing on the moon on July 20th, 1969 and now planting rovers on Mars to landing on Bennu and getting samples and figuring out how Earth was made. It is just amazing how we have done this from 1969-2019, but we still have a lot to learn from space exploration and maybe one day we could live on Mars and other planets."

David (5th grade, Fontana, CA)

February 22, 2019 | 4:13 p.m

Tommy (5th grade, Fontana, CA)

"I like this picture because it shows what is out there and that there is so much to explore, and we have the technology to explore this"

Tommy (5th grade, Fontana, CA)

February 22, 2019 | 4:12 p.m

Nicole (5th Grade, Fontana, CA)

"I really like this picture because it is very pretty and it encourages me to be creative and also to be myself. I also like the different colors that it has."

Nicole (5th Grade, Fontana, CA)

February 22, 2019 | 4:12 p.m

ESW

"The Earth from Saturn. It makes us look small and insignificant."

ESW

February 22, 2019 | 4:12 p.m

Sanuka Siyasara

"The Insight mission one of my favorite missions. This mission is also related to geography, technology, space science, etc. Also, I like this because it is done by NASA/JPL. InSight reads seismic waves on Mars and studies Mars' winds, heat and interior. This includes a seismometer named SEIS and a heat probe named HP3. With this mission, we can understand more about Mars and Mars' underground. It will be a great aid to Mars settlements and future NASA missions."

Sanuka Siyasara

February 22, 2019 | 4:12 p.m