Share Your Story

Fill out the fields below to share your photos and comments. (Note: Posts are moderated.)


What's your favorite NASA space image and why?
+ Click here to explore NASA images
BROWSE
remove file Photos must be JPG or PNG and not exceed 5 MB combined
Please wait, processing...

Sherie LaPrade

"This image taken of Pluto by New Horizons in 2015 is one of my absolute favorites, even in black and white! It completely blows me away! We're looking at a dwarf planet 7.5 billion km away from earth and it has the most incredible geography – majestic mountains, valleys, plains and craters (probably even river beds)! It has completely reignited my passion and interest in planetary science!"

Sherie LaPrade

March 1, 2018 | 12:48 p.m

Lyle Tavernier, JPL education specialist

"As a young child, I remember seeing this picture hanging in the hallway at home. It sparked my curiosity on so many levels, and that initial interest in the Moon quickly expanded to include other places in the solar system.

Several years ago, I found that picture in my mom's storage and took it home. It's now framed and hangs on a wall in my house as a reminder of how a single image sparked a lifelong interest in space exploration. It’s also a reminder of how that spark ultimately led to a job with NASA that allows me to help teachers inspire scientists and engineers of the future."

Lyle Tavernier, JPL education specialist

February 14, 2018 | 9:48 a.m

Phil Davis, JPL web producer

"Human and machine working together on the Moon. This photo shows the process of exploration from can we get there to boots on the ground. Surveyor III (the robot) helped prove it was safe to land on the Moon. Apollo 12 proved precision landing techniques by landing so close (the Lunar Excursion Module is on the horizon). Pete Conrad and Alan Bean brought back parts of Surveyor III to be studied on Earth."

Phil Davis, JPL web producer

February 14, 2018 | 9:45 a.m

David Seidel, JPL K-12 education manager

"This is an image of a small portion of Melas Chasma in Valles Marineris taken by the Mars Orbiter Camera on Mars Global Surveyor in 1999. The plateau at the top gives way to cliffs that descend to expose volcanic deposition layers laid down over time, then to narrow eroding gullies with alluvial fans of dark dust and the valley floor almost completely covered with dunes creeping slowly along in the prevailing wind direction. A dust devil is at the lower left. I like this picture because it is dramatic, but more because the entire span of Mars time and rates of change is here. The plateau is eons old and will endure; the fans and dunes change very gradually; the dust devil existed only as the camera captured the moment."

David Seidel, JPL K-12 education manager

February 13, 2018 | 5:49 p.m

Preston Dyches, JPL public engagement specialist

"I love this view from the Cassini mission to Saturn, titled "Enceladus the Storyteller," partly because it's a mosaic of many images, stitched together, so it's HUGE and there are so many little details to explore. It's also really special to me because I wrote the image caption, back in 2006, and I remember how new and mysterious this moon was -- we didn't know it had a global ocean at the time!"

Preston Dyches, JPL public engagement specialist

February 13, 2018 | 5:04 p.m

Aimee Meyer, JPL public engagement specialist

"This photo of the pancake domes or lava domes on Venus was a career changer for me. I was lucky enough to work with the Magellan science team while going to school for a totally different major. Then one day, images of these amazing and unique features discovered on the surface of Venus came in and completely changed the way I began to look at geology and science. From that day forward and 28 years later, I have the privilege of seeing the fantastic views our solar system has to offer."

Aimee Meyer, JPL public engagement specialist

February 13, 2018 | 5:04 p.m

Shannon Barger

"I have always loved the artist concept images created to show what it might be like to live on another planet. They allow our imagination to bring us into another world."

Shannon Barger

February 13, 2018 | 2:52 p.m

Shannon Morgan, Solar System Ambassador

"When I saw this image as a child, seeing what a tiny speck of dust we live on, it made me want to learn everything I could about the universe!"

Shannon Morgan, Solar System Ambassador

February 13, 2018 | 2:52 p.m

Marty McGuire, Solar System Ambassador

"On July 19, 2013, my son and I waved at Saturn at the approximate time the Cassini spacecraft took this picture of Earth. I love this NASA photo because it’s a humbling experience to feel so small here on Earth, yet be part of the human race, which is exploring deep into our amazing solar system."

Marty McGuire, Solar System Ambassador

February 13, 2018 | 2:51 p.m