NASA's Solar TErrestrial RElations Observatory satellites have provided the first 3-dimensional images of the Sun. This view will aid scientists' ability to understand solar physics to improve space weather forecasting.
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Left Limb of North Pole of the Sun, March 20, 2007 (Anaglyph)

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