704 images found for "The Universe" Wallpaper
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Featured (148)
Sun (43)
Mercury (15)
Venus (88)
Earth (854)
Mars (2462)
Jupiter (86)
Saturn (568)
Uranus (27)
Neptune (37)
Dwarf Planets (8)
Asteroids & Comets (459)
The Universe (704)
Spacecraft & Technology (434)
This artist's concept illustrates a comet being torn to shreds around a dead star, or white dwarf, called G29-38. NASA's Spitzer Space Telescope observed a cloud of dust around this white dwarf that may have been generated from comet disruption.
This artist's concept illustrates a comet being torn to shreds around a dead star, or white dwarf, called G29-38. NASA's Spitzer Space Telescope observed a cloud of dust around this white dwarf that may have been generated from comet disruption.

Comet 'Bites the Dust' Around Dead Star (Artist Concept)

A group of six streaking objects,  the identities of which remain unknown, can be seen here flying across the telescope's sight in this image from NASA's Galaxy Evolution Explorer.
A group of six streaking objects,  the identities of which remain unknown, can be seen here flying across the telescope's sight in this image from NASA's Galaxy Evolution Explorer.

Surprise Ultraviolet Party in the Sky

This artist's concept depicts a distant hypothetical solar system, similar in age to our own. Looking inward from the system's outer fringes, a ring of dusty debris can be seen, and within it, planets circling a star the size of our Sun.
This artist's concept depicts a distant hypothetical solar system, similar in age to our own. Looking inward from the system's outer fringes, a ring of dusty debris can be seen, and within it, planets circling a star the size of our Sun.

A Distant Solar System (Artist's Concept)

This artist's concept is of the one-million-year-old star system called UX Tau A, approximately 450 light-years away. NASA's Spitzer Space Telescope showed a gap in the dusty planet-forming disk swirling around the system's central sun-like star.
This artist's concept is of the one-million-year-old star system called UX Tau A, approximately 450 light-years away. NASA's Spitzer Space Telescope showed a gap in the dusty planet-forming disk swirling around the system's central sun-like star.

UX Tau A (Artist Concept)

This artist's concept illustrates one of the largest smash-ups of galaxies ever observed. NASA's Spitzer Space Telescope spotted the four galaxies shown here (yellow blobs) in the process of tangling and ultimately merging into a single gargantuan galaxy.
This artist's concept illustrates one of the largest smash-ups of galaxies ever observed. NASA's Spitzer Space Telescope spotted the four galaxies shown here (yellow blobs) in the process of tangling and ultimately merging into a single gargantuan galaxy.

Galactic Pile-Up (Artist Concept)

This image from NASA's Spitzer Space Telescope (left panel) shows the 'bow shock' of a dying star named R Hydrae, or R Hya, in the constellation Hydra.
This image from NASA's Spitzer Space Telescope (left panel) shows the 'bow shock' of a dying star named R Hydrae, or R Hya, in the constellation Hydra.

Red Giant Plunging Through Space

The Trifid Nebula is a giant star-forming cloud of gas and dust located 5,400 light-years away in the constellation Sagittarius, seen here by NASA's Spitzer Space Telescope.
The Trifid Nebula is a giant star-forming cloud of gas and dust located 5,400 light-years away in the constellation Sagittarius, seen here by NASA's Spitzer Space Telescope.

Stellar 'Incubators' Seen Cooking up Stars

Bright, young disks can be imaged directly by visible-light telescopes, such as NASA's Hubble Space Telescope. Older, fainter debris disks can be detected only by infrared telescopes like NASA's Spitzer Space Telescope, which sense the disks' dim heat.
Bright, young disks can be imaged directly by visible-light telescopes, such as NASA's Hubble Space Telescope. Older, fainter debris disks can be detected only by infrared telescopes like NASA's Spitzer Space Telescope, which sense the disks' dim heat.

The Evolution of a Planet-Forming Disk (Artist's Concept Animation)

This Spitzer Space Telescope composite shows the supernova remnant Cassiopeia A (white ball) and surrounding clouds of dust (gray, orange and blue). It consists of two processed images taken one year apart.
This Spitzer Space Telescope composite shows the supernova remnant Cassiopeia A (white ball) and surrounding clouds of dust (gray, orange and blue). It consists of two processed images taken one year apart.

Dead Star Rumbles

This composite image NASA's Galaxy Evolution Explorer  shows Z Camelopardalis, or Z Cam, a double-star system featuring a collapsed, dead star, called a white dwarf, and a companion star, as well as a ghostly shell around the system.
This composite image NASA's Galaxy Evolution Explorer  shows Z Camelopardalis, or Z Cam, a double-star system featuring a collapsed, dead star, called a white dwarf, and a companion star, as well as a ghostly shell around the system.

Scene of Multiple Explosions

This image from  NASA's Spitzer Space Telescope, shows the wispy filamentary structure of Henize 206, is a four-color composite mosaic created by combining data from an infrared array camera (IRAC).
This image from  NASA's Spitzer Space Telescope, shows the wispy filamentary structure of Henize 206, is a four-color composite mosaic created by combining data from an infrared array camera (IRAC).

Star Formation in Henize 206

This infrared image from NASA's Spitzer Space Telescope shows three baby stars in the bustling center of our Milky Way galaxy. The three stars are the first to be discovered in the region.
This infrared image from NASA's Spitzer Space Telescope shows three baby stars in the bustling center of our Milky Way galaxy. The three stars are the first to be discovered in the region.

Baby Stars Finally Found in Jumbled Galactic Center

This composite image from NASA's Spitzer Space Telescope shows the remnant of a star that exploded, called Cassiopeia A (center) and its surrounding 'light echoes' -- dances of light through dusty clouds, created when stars blast apart.
This composite image from NASA's Spitzer Space Telescope shows the remnant of a star that exploded, called Cassiopeia A (center) and its surrounding 'light echoes' -- dances of light through dusty clouds, created when stars blast apart.

Dance of the Light Echoes

A big galaxy is stealing gas right off the 'back' of its smaller companion in this new image from NASA's Spitzer Space Telescope. The stolen gas is hot, but it might eventually cool down to make new stars and planets.
A big galaxy is stealing gas right off the 'back' of its smaller companion in this new image from NASA's Spitzer Space Telescope. The stolen gas is hot, but it might eventually cool down to make new stars and planets.

Wanted: Galactic Thief Who Steals Gas

This diagram illustrates research from NASA's Galaxy Evolution Explorer showing that black holes (once they reach a critical size) can put the brakes on new star formation in elliptical galaxies.
This diagram illustrates research from NASA's Galaxy Evolution Explorer showing that black holes (once they reach a critical size) can put the brakes on new star formation in elliptical galaxies.

Big Black Holes Mean Bad News for Stars (diagram)

In this artist's conception, a possible newfound planet spins through a clearing in a nearby star's dusty, planet-forming disc. This clearing was detected around the star CoKu Tau 4 by NASA's Spitzer Space Telescope.
In this artist's conception, a possible newfound planet spins through a clearing in a nearby star's dusty, planet-forming disc. This clearing was detected around the star CoKu Tau 4 by NASA's Spitzer Space Telescope.

Out of the Dust, A Planet is Born (Artist Concept)

More than 800,000 frames from NASA's Spitzer Space Telescope were stitched together to create this infrared portrait of dust and stars radiating in the inner Milky Way.
More than 800,000 frames from NASA's Spitzer Space Telescope were stitched together to create this infrared portrait of dust and stars radiating in the inner Milky Way.

Spitzer Finds Clarity in the Inner Milky Way

This artist's concept, based on spectral observations from NASA's Hubble Space Telescope and Spitzer Space Telescope, shows a cloudy Jupiter-like planet that orbits very close to its fiery hot star.
This artist's concept, based on spectral observations from NASA's Hubble Space Telescope and Spitzer Space Telescope, shows a cloudy Jupiter-like planet that orbits very close to its fiery hot star.

Exotic Atmospheres (Artist Concept)

This ultraviolet color blowup of the Groth Deep Image was taken by NASA's Galaxy Evolution Explorer on June 22 and June 23, 2003. Many hundreds of galaxies are detected in this portion of the image.
This ultraviolet color blowup of the Groth Deep Image was taken by NASA's Galaxy Evolution Explorer on June 22 and June 23, 2003. Many hundreds of galaxies are detected in this portion of the image.

Groth Deep Image

This image illustrates that buckyballs -- discovered in space by NASA's Spitzer Space Telescope -- closely resemble old fashioned, black-and-white soccer balls, only on much smaller scales.
This image illustrates that buckyballs -- discovered in space by NASA's Spitzer Space Telescope -- closely resemble old fashioned, black-and-white soccer balls, only on much smaller scales.

Mini Soccer Balls in Space

This artist's diagram based on observations from NASA's Spitzer Space Telescope compares the Epsilon Eridani system to our own solar system. The two systems are structure
This artist's diagram based on observations from NASA's Spitzer Space Telescope compares the Epsilon Eridani system to our own solar system. The two systems are structure

Young Solar System in the Making (Artist Concept)

More than 444,580 frames from NASA's Spitzer Space Telescope were stitched together to create this portrait of the raging star-formation occurring in the inner Milky Way.
More than 444,580 frames from NASA's Spitzer Space Telescope were stitched together to create this portrait of the raging star-formation occurring in the inner Milky Way.

Inner Milky Way Raging with Star Formation

This image zooms into a small portion of NASA's Kepler's full field of view -- an expansive, 100-square-degree patch of sky in our Milky Way galaxy. At the center of the field is a star with a known 'hot Jupiter' planet, named 'TrES-2.'
This image zooms into a small portion of NASA's Kepler's full field of view -- an expansive, 100-square-degree patch of sky in our Milky Way galaxy. At the center of the field is a star with a known 'hot Jupiter' planet, named 'TrES-2.'

Host to 'Hot Jupiter'

This star chart illustrates the large patch of sky that NASA's Kepler mission will stare at for the duration of its three-and-a-half-year lifetime.
This star chart illustrates the large patch of sky that NASA's Kepler mission will stare at for the duration of its three-and-a-half-year lifetime.

Where Kepler Sees

NASA’s Spitzer Space Telescope captured the 'Cat’s Eye' nebula, or NGC 6543, is a well-studied example of a 'planetary nebula.' Such objects are the glowing remnants of dust and gas expelled from moderate-sized stars during their last stages of life.
NASA’s Spitzer Space Telescope captured the 'Cat’s Eye' nebula, or NGC 6543, is a well-studied example of a 'planetary nebula.' Such objects are the glowing remnants of dust and gas expelled from moderate-sized stars during their last stages of life.

Galactic Dust Bunnies Found to Contain Carbon After All

Currently displaying images 651-675 of 704
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