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Scientists measure the spin rates of supermassive black holes by spreading the X-ray light into different colors. The light comes from accretion disks that swirl around black holes, as shown in both of the artist's concepts.
Scientists measure the spin rates of supermassive black holes by spreading the X-ray light into different colors. The light comes from accretion disks that swirl around black holes, as shown in both of the artist's concepts.

Two Models of Black Hole Spin (Artist's Concept)

Artist's concept of the first rocky world discovered by NASA's Kepler mission. The planet, called Kepler 10-b, is shown in front of its host star.
Artist's concept of the first rocky world discovered by NASA's Kepler mission. The planet, called Kepler 10-b, is shown in front of its host star.

NASA's Kepler Mission Discovers Its First Rocky Planet (Artist Concept)

NASA's Spitzer Space Telescope contributed to the infrared component of the observations of a surprisingly large collections of galaxies (red dots in center). Shorter-wavelength infrared and visible data are provided by Japan's Subaru telescope.
NASA's Spitzer Space Telescope contributed to the infrared component of the observations of a surprisingly large collections of galaxies (red dots in center). Shorter-wavelength infrared and visible data are provided by Japan's Subaru telescope.

Galactic Metropolis

NASA's Hubble Space Telescope shows the inner region of Abell 1689, an immense cluster of galaxies located 2.2 billion light-years away. The cluster's gravitational field is warping light from background galaxies, causing them to appear as arcs.
NASA's Hubble Space Telescope shows the inner region of Abell 1689, an immense cluster of galaxies located 2.2 billion light-years away. The cluster's gravitational field is warping light from background galaxies, causing them to appear as arcs.

Fun House Mirror in Space

This mosaic reveals a panorama of the Milky Way from NASA's Spitzer Space Telescope. This picture covers only about three percent of the sky, but includes more than half of the galaxy's stars and the majority of its star formation activity.
This mosaic reveals a panorama of the Milky Way from NASA's Spitzer Space Telescope. This picture covers only about three percent of the sky, but includes more than half of the galaxy's stars and the majority of its star formation activity.

GLIMPSE the Galaxy All the Way Around

A plot of the transmission spectrum for exoplanet HAT-P-11b, with data from NASA's Kepler, Hubble and Spitzer observatories combined. The results show a robust detection of water absorption in the Hubble data.
A plot of the transmission spectrum for exoplanet HAT-P-11b, with data from NASA's Kepler, Hubble and Spitzer observatories combined. The results show a robust detection of water absorption in the Hubble data.

Transmission Spectrum of HAT-P-11b

This ultraviolet image from NASA's Galaxy Evolution Explorer shows the interacting pair NGC 1097, a barred spiral galaxy, and the small elliptical companion galaxy NGC 1097A.
This ultraviolet image from NASA's Galaxy Evolution Explorer shows the interacting pair NGC 1097, a barred spiral galaxy, and the small elliptical companion galaxy NGC 1097A.

A Barred SpiralGalaxy, and the Small Elliptical Companion Galaxy NGC 1097A

This artist's concept illustrates how planetary systems arise out of massive collisions between rocky bodies. NASA's Spitzer Space Telescope show that these catastrophes continue to occur around stars even after they have developed full-sized planets.
This artist's concept illustrates how planetary systems arise out of massive collisions between rocky bodies. NASA's Spitzer Space Telescope show that these catastrophes continue to occur around stars even after they have developed full-sized planets.

The Rocky World of Young Planetary Systems (Artist Concept)

This three-color image of galaxy M101 was taken by NASA's Galaxy Evolution Explorer on June 20, 2003. The far ultraviolet emissions are shown in blue, the near ultraviolet emissions are green, and the red emissions, taken from NASA's Digital Sky Survey.
This three-color image of galaxy M101 was taken by NASA's Galaxy Evolution Explorer on June 20, 2003. The far ultraviolet emissions are shown in blue, the near ultraviolet emissions are green, and the red emissions, taken from NASA's Digital Sky Survey.

Galaxy M101

This artist's concept illustrates an imminent planetary collision around a pair of double stars. NASA's Spitzer Space Telescope found evidence that such collisions could be common around a certain type of tight double, or binary, star system.
This artist's concept illustrates an imminent planetary collision around a pair of double stars. NASA's Spitzer Space Telescope found evidence that such collisions could be common around a certain type of tight double, or binary, star system.

Before the Smashup (Artist's Concept)

The closest supernova of its kind to be observed in the last few decades, M82 or the 'Cigar galaxy,' has sparked a global observing campaign involving legions of instruments on the ground and in space, including NASA's Spitzer Space Telescope.
The closest supernova of its kind to be observed in the last few decades, M82 or the 'Cigar galaxy,' has sparked a global observing campaign involving legions of instruments on the ground and in space, including NASA's Spitzer Space Telescope.

Seeing Through a Veil of Dust

In this infrared view from the Herschel Observatory, a European Space Agency mission, blue shows the warmest dust, and red, the coolest. The choppy clouds of gas and dust are just starting to condense into new stars.
In this infrared view from the Herschel Observatory, a European Space Agency mission, blue shows the warmest dust, and red, the coolest. The choppy clouds of gas and dust are just starting to condense into new stars.

Dark Star-Making Factory

This artist's concept illustrates the two Saturn-sized planets discovered by NASA's Kepler mission. The star system is oriented edge-on, as seen by Kepler, such that both planets cross in front, or transit, their star, named Kepler-9.
This artist's concept illustrates the two Saturn-sized planets discovered by NASA's Kepler mission. The star system is oriented edge-on, as seen by Kepler, such that both planets cross in front, or transit, their star, named Kepler-9.

Worlds on the Edge (Artist's Concept)

Astronomers using data from NASA's Kepler mission and ground-based telescopes recently discovered the three smallest exoplanets known to circle another star, called KOI-961.01, KOI-961.02 and KOI-961.03.
Astronomers using data from NASA's Kepler mission and ground-based telescopes recently discovered the three smallest exoplanets known to circle another star, called KOI-961.01, KOI-961.02 and KOI-961.03.

Sizing Up Exoplanets

The tightly packed system, named Kepler-444, is home to five small planets in very compact orbits. The planets were detected from the dimming that occurs when they transit the disk of their parent star, as shown in this artist's conception.
The tightly packed system, named Kepler-444, is home to five small planets in very compact orbits. The planets were detected from the dimming that occurs when they transit the disk of their parent star, as shown in this artist's conception.

Kepler-444 Planetary System (Artist Concept)

Astronomers have discovered two gas giant planets orbiting stars in the Beehive cluster, a collection of about 1,000 tightly packed stars.
Astronomers have discovered two gas giant planets orbiting stars in the Beehive cluster, a collection of about 1,000 tightly packed stars.

Starry Starry Skies (Artist's Concept)

A massive star (left), which has created elements as heavy as iron in its interior, blows up in a tremendous explosion (middle), scattering its outer layers in a structure called a supernova remnant (right).
A massive star (left), which has created elements as heavy as iron in its interior, blows up in a tremendous explosion (middle), scattering its outer layers in a structure called a supernova remnant (right).

Evolution of a Supernova

This image shows two of the galaxy clusters observed by NASA's WISE and Spitzer Space Telescope missions. Galaxy clusters are among the most massive structures in the universe.
This image shows two of the galaxy clusters observed by NASA's WISE and Spitzer Space Telescope missions. Galaxy clusters are among the most massive structures in the universe.

Monster in the Middle: Brightest Cluster Galaxy

This image is one of six images taken by NASA's Spitzer Space Telescope, showing that tight-knit twin, or binary stars might be triggered to form by asymmetrical envelopes.
This image is one of six images taken by NASA's Spitzer Space Telescope, showing that tight-knit twin, or binary stars might be triggered to form by asymmetrical envelopes.

Blobs House Twin Stars

Some might see a blood-red jellyfish, while others might see a pair of lips. In fact, the red-colored object in this new image from NASA's Wide-field Infrared Survey Explorer is a sphere of stellar innards.
Some might see a blood-red jellyfish, while others might see a pair of lips. In fact, the red-colored object in this new image from NASA's Wide-field Infrared Survey Explorer is a sphere of stellar innards.

Jumbo Jellyfish or Massive Star?

NASA's Hubble Space Telescope's sharp view was used to look for gravitational arcs and rings which are produced when one galaxy acts as a lens to magnify and distort the appearance of another galaxy behind it.
NASA's Hubble Space Telescope's sharp view was used to look for gravitational arcs and rings which are produced when one galaxy acts as a lens to magnify and distort the appearance of another galaxy behind it.

Quasar Lenses

This montage combines observations from NASA's Spitzer Space Telescope and NASA's Galaxy Evolution Explorer (GALEX) spacecraft showing three examples of colliding galaxies from a new photo atlas of galactic 'train wrecks.'
This montage combines observations from NASA's Spitzer Space Telescope and NASA's Galaxy Evolution Explorer (GALEX) spacecraft showing three examples of colliding galaxies from a new photo atlas of galactic 'train wrecks.'

Galactic Train Wrecks

This mosaic of images covering the entire sky was observed by NASA's WISE telescope and is part of its All-Sky Data Release. The projection used in this image of the sky is called an 'equirectangular.'
This mosaic of images covering the entire sky was observed by NASA's WISE telescope and is part of its All-Sky Data Release. The projection used in this image of the sky is called an 'equirectangular.'

Mapping the Infrared Universe: The Entire WISE Sky -- Rectangular Format

NASA's three Great Observatories -- the Hubble Space Telescope, the SpitzerSpace Telescope, and the Chandra X-ray Observatory -- joined forces to probe theexpanding remains of a supernova, called Kepler's supernova remnant.
NASA's three Great Observatories -- the Hubble Space Telescope, the SpitzerSpace Telescope, and the Chandra X-ray Observatory -- joined forces to probe theexpanding remains of a supernova, called Kepler's supernova remnant.

Three Great Eyes on Kepler's Supernova Remnant

Two young binary stars may be the source of mysterious clock-like bursts of light from an object called LRLL 54361 that lies inside the star-forming region IC 348, located 950 light-years away.
Two young binary stars may be the source of mysterious clock-like bursts of light from an object called LRLL 54361 that lies inside the star-forming region IC 348, located 950 light-years away.

Artist's Impression of Pulsating Object LRLL 54361

Currently displaying images 626-650 of 957
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