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This global color mosaic of Triton, taken in 1989 by NASA's Voyager 2 shows Triton, the largest satellite of Neptune. Triton has the coldest surface known anywhere in the solar system; it is so cold that most of Triton's nitrogen is condensed as frost.
This global color mosaic of Triton, taken in 1989 by NASA's Voyager 2 shows Triton, the largest satellite of Neptune. Triton has the coldest surface known anywhere in the solar system; it is so cold that most of Triton's nitrogen is condensed as frost.

Global Color Mosaic of Triton

NASA's Voyager 2 acquired this black and white image of Triton, Neptune's largest satellite, during the night of Aug. 24-25, 1989. Triton's limb cuts obliquely across the middle of the image. The field of view is about 1,000 km (600 miles) across.
NASA's Voyager 2 acquired this black and white image of Triton, Neptune's largest satellite, during the night of Aug. 24-25, 1989. Triton's limb cuts obliquely across the middle of the image. The field of view is about 1,000 km (600 miles) across.

Triton - Detail of Dark and Light Material

This is one of the most detailed views of the surface of Triton taken by NASA's Voyager 2 on its flyby of the large satellite of Neptune early in the morning of Aug. 25, 1989. The picture was stored on the tape recorder and relayed to Earth later.
This is one of the most detailed views of the surface of Triton taken by NASA's Voyager 2 on its flyby of the large satellite of Neptune early in the morning of Aug. 25, 1989. The picture was stored on the tape recorder and relayed to Earth later.

Triton High Resolution View of Northern Hemisphere

This color image from NASA's Voyager 2 was reconstructed by making a computer composite of three black and white images taken through red, green, and blue filters. Details on Triton's surface unfold dramatically in this sequence of approach images.
This color image from NASA's Voyager 2 was reconstructed by making a computer composite of three black and white images taken through red, green, and blue filters. Details on Triton's surface unfold dramatically in this sequence of approach images.

Color Sequence of Triton Approach Images

In this image from NASA's Voyager wide-angle image taken on Aug. 23 1989, the two main rings of Neptune can be clearly seen. In the lower part of the frame the originally announced ring arc, consisting of three distinct features, is visible.
In this image from NASA's Voyager wide-angle image taken on Aug. 23 1989, the two main rings of Neptune can be clearly seen. In the lower part of the frame the originally announced ring arc, consisting of three distinct features, is visible.

Neptune Rings and 1989N2

This bulls-eye view of Neptune's small dark spot (D2) was obtained by NASA' s Voyager 2's narrow-angle camera on Aug. 24, 1989, when Voyager 2 was within 1.1 million km (680,000 miles) of the planet.
This bulls-eye view of Neptune's small dark spot (D2) was obtained by NASA' s Voyager 2's narrow-angle camera on Aug. 24, 1989, when Voyager 2 was within 1.1 million km (680,000 miles) of the planet.

Neptune's Dark Spot (D2) at High Resolution

Nereid, the last satellite of Neptune to be discovered before NASA's Voyager's discoveries in 1989, was first seen by Gerard Kuiper in 1949.
Nereid, the last satellite of Neptune to be discovered before NASA's Voyager's discoveries in 1989, was first seen by Gerard Kuiper in 1949.

Nereid

These two images of Neptune were taken by NASA's Voyager 2's narrow angle camera when the spacecraft was about 12 million km (7.5 million miles) from Neptune.
These two images of Neptune were taken by NASA's Voyager 2's narrow angle camera when the spacecraft was about 12 million km (7.5 million miles) from Neptune.

Neptune - Two Images

This image was returned by NASA's Voyager 2 spacecraft on July 3, 1989. The planet and its largest satellite, Triton, are captured in view; Triton appears in the lower right corner at about 5 o'clock relative to Neptune.
This image was returned by NASA's Voyager 2 spacecraft on July 3, 1989. The planet and its largest satellite, Triton, are captured in view; Triton appears in the lower right corner at about 5 o'clock relative to Neptune.

Neptune and Triton

This image of Neptune's south polar region was obtained by NASA's Voyager on Aug. 23, 1989. The image shows the discovery of shadows in Neptune's atmosphere, shadows cast onto a deep cloud bank by small elevated clouds.
This image of Neptune's south polar region was obtained by NASA's Voyager on Aug. 23, 1989. The image shows the discovery of shadows in Neptune's atmosphere, shadows cast onto a deep cloud bank by small elevated clouds.

Neptune - Closest Approach

This mosaic from NASA's Galileo Probe is of an equatorial
This mosaic from NASA's Galileo Probe is of an equatorial

Neptune - Full Ring System

This photograph of Neptune was reconstructed from two images taken by NASA's Voyager 2. At the north (top) is the Great Dark Spot.
This photograph of Neptune was reconstructed from two images taken by NASA's Voyager 2. At the north (top) is the Great Dark Spot.

Neptune - Great Dark Spot, Scooter, Dark Spot 2

This natural color image of the limb of Triton was taken early in the morning of Aug. 25 1989, when the Voyager 2 spacecraft was at a distance of about 210,000 kilometers (128,000 miles) from the icy satellite.
This natural color image of the limb of Triton was taken early in the morning of Aug. 25 1989, when the Voyager 2 spacecraft was at a distance of about 210,000 kilometers (128,000 miles) from the icy satellite.

The Limb of Triton

This image captured by the NASA's Voyager 2 spacecraft on July 30, 1989, was used to confirm the discovery of three new satellites orbiting Neptune.
This image captured by the NASA's Voyager 2 spacecraft on July 30, 1989, was used to confirm the discovery of three new satellites orbiting Neptune.

Neptune - Three New Satellites

This image was returned by NASA's Voyager 2 spacecraft on July 3, 1989. The planet and its largest satellite, Triton, are captured in view; Triton appears in the lower right corner at about 5 o'clock relative to Neptune.
This image was returned by NASA's Voyager 2 spacecraft on July 3, 1989. The planet and its largest satellite, Triton, are captured in view; Triton appears in the lower right corner at about 5 o'clock relative to Neptune.

Hubble Space Telescope Wide Field Planetary Camera 2 Observations of Neptune

This false color photograph of Neptune was made from Voyager 2 images taken through three filters: blue, green, and a filter that passes light at a wavelength that is absorbed by methane gas.
This false color photograph of Neptune was made from Voyager 2 images taken through three filters: blue, green, and a filter that passes light at a wavelength that is absorbed by methane gas.

Neptune False Color Image of Haze

This wide-angle image from NASA's Voyager 2, taken in 1989, was taken through the camera's clear filter, and was the first to show Neptune's rings in detail.
This wide-angle image from NASA's Voyager 2, taken in 1989, was taken through the camera's clear filter, and was the first to show Neptune's rings in detail.

Neptune's Rings

Using powerful ground-and space-based NASA telescopes, scientists have obtained a moving look at some of the wildest, weirdest weather in the solar system.
Using powerful ground-and space-based NASA telescopes, scientists have obtained a moving look at some of the wildest, weirdest weather in the solar system.

Neptune's Stormy Disposition

This contrast enhanced color picture of Neptune was acquired by NASA's Voyager 2 on Aug. 14, 1989. As Voyager 2 approached Neptune, rapidly increasing image resolution is revealed striking new details. Bright, wispy clouds are seen overlying the Great Dar
This contrast enhanced color picture of Neptune was acquired by NASA's Voyager 2 on Aug. 14, 1989. As Voyager 2 approached Neptune, rapidly increasing image resolution is revealed striking new details. Bright, wispy clouds are seen overlying the Great Dar

Neptune

This false color image of Triton is a composite of images taken through the violet, green and ultraviolet filters. The image was taken early on Aug. 25, 1989 when Voyager 2 was about 190,000 kilometers (118,000 miles) from Triton's surface.
This false color image of Triton is a composite of images taken through the violet, green and ultraviolet filters. The image was taken early on Aug. 25, 1989 when Voyager 2 was about 190,000 kilometers (118,000 miles) from Triton's surface.

Triton

During August 16 and 17, 1989, the Voyager 2 narrow-angle camera was used to photograph Neptune almost continuously, recording approximately two and one-half rotations of the planet..
During August 16 and 17, 1989, the Voyager 2 narrow-angle camera was used to photograph Neptune almost continuously, recording approximately two and one-half rotations of the planet..

Neptune Full Disk

This photograph shows the last face on view of the Great Dark Spot that NASA's Voyager made with its narrow angle camera.
This photograph shows the last face on view of the Great Dark Spot that NASA's Voyager made with its narrow angle camera.

Neptune Great Dark Spot in High Resolution

This dramatic view of the crescents of Neptune and Triton was acquired by Voyager 2 approximately 3 days, 6 and one-half hours after its closest approach to Neptune (north is to the right).
This dramatic view of the crescents of Neptune and Triton was acquired by Voyager 2 approximately 3 days, 6 and one-half hours after its closest approach to Neptune (north is to the right).

Crescents of Neptune and Triton

This photograph of Neptune shows three of the features that NASA's Voyager 2 has photographed. At the north is the Great Dark Spot, accompanied by bright, white clouds that undergo rapid changes in appearance.
This photograph of Neptune shows three of the features that NASA's Voyager 2 has photographed. At the north is the Great Dark Spot, accompanied by bright, white clouds that undergo rapid changes in appearance.

Neptune

NASA's Voyager 2's post-encounter view of Neptune's south pole as the spacecraft sped away on a southward trajectory.
NASA's Voyager 2's post-encounter view of Neptune's south pole as the spacecraft sped away on a southward trajectory.

Post-encounter View of Neptune's South Pole

Currently displaying images 1-25 of 82
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