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NASA's Phoenix Mars Lander reaching with its Robotic Arm and taking a picture of the surface underneath the lander. The light feature in the middle of the image below the leg is informally called 'Holy Cow.'
NASA's Phoenix Mars Lander reaching with its Robotic Arm and taking a picture of the surface underneath the lander. The light feature in the middle of the image below the leg is informally called 'Holy Cow.'

How Phoenix Looks Under Itself

This is an image of a camera pushing through NASA's Phoenix Mars Lander's Stereo Surface Imager (SSI).
This is an image of a camera pushing through NASA's Phoenix Mars Lander's Stereo Surface Imager (SSI).

Phoenix Telltale Movement

This image taken by the Stereo Surface Imager aboard NASA's Phoenix Mars Lander focuses on items on the deck rather than the workspace or horizon on Sol 9.
This image taken by the Stereo Surface Imager aboard NASA's Phoenix Mars Lander focuses on items on the deck rather than the workspace or horizon on Sol 9.

Telltale Animation (Sol 9)

This image taken by the Stereo Surface Imager aboard NASA's Phoenix Mars Lander focuses on items on the deck rather than the workspace or horizon on Sol 9.
This image taken by the Stereo Surface Imager aboard NASA's Phoenix Mars Lander focuses on items on the deck rather than the workspace or horizon on Sol 9.

Telltale Animation (Sol 9)

This from NASA's Phoenix Mars Lander's Stereo Surface Imager (SSI) camera shows Phoenix's parachute, backshell, heatshield, and impact site.
This from NASA's Phoenix Mars Lander's Stereo Surface Imager (SSI) camera shows Phoenix's parachute, backshell, heatshield, and impact site.

Scoopful of Martian Soil After Release

This from NASA's Phoenix Mars Lander's Stereo Surface Imager (SSI) camera shows Phoenix's parachute, backshell, heatshield, and impact site.
This from NASA's Phoenix Mars Lander's Stereo Surface Imager (SSI) camera shows Phoenix's parachute, backshell, heatshield, and impact site.

Phoenix Site Panorama

This image is of the Canadian-built lidar in operation (with the cover open) was acquired at the NASA's Mars Phoenix Lander landing site on Sol 3.
This image is of the Canadian-built lidar in operation (with the cover open) was acquired at the NASA's Mars Phoenix Lander landing site on Sol 3.

Weather Station's Lidar in Action

This image shows the workspace reachable by the scoop on the robotic arm of NASA's Phoenix Mars Lander, along with some measurements of rock sizes.
This image shows the workspace reachable by the scoop on the robotic arm of NASA's Phoenix Mars Lander, along with some measurements of rock sizes.

Phoenix Checks out its Work Area

Fun, fairy-tale nicknames have been assigned to features in this animated view of the workspace reachable by the robotic arm of NASA's Phoenix Mars Lander. For example, 'Sleepy Hollow' denotes a trench and 'Headless' designates a rock.
Fun, fairy-tale nicknames have been assigned to features in this animated view of the workspace reachable by the robotic arm of NASA's Phoenix Mars Lander. For example, 'Sleepy Hollow' denotes a trench and 'Headless' designates a rock.

A Fairy-Tale Landscape

This image was taken by NASA's Phoenix Mars Lander's Stereo Surface Imager (SSI) on Sol 3. It illustrates the actions that Phoenix's Robotic Arm took to deploy its wrist.
This image was taken by NASA's Phoenix Mars Lander's Stereo Surface Imager (SSI) on Sol 3. It illustrates the actions that Phoenix's Robotic Arm took to deploy its wrist.

Phoenix Deploying its Wrist

This image from NASA's Phoenix Mars Lander's Stereo Surface Imager (SSI) taken on Sol 3. It shows the stair-step motion used to unstow the arm from a protective covering called the biobarrier.
This image from NASA's Phoenix Mars Lander's Stereo Surface Imager (SSI) taken on Sol 3. It shows the stair-step motion used to unstow the arm from a protective covering called the biobarrier.

Phoenix Deploying its Robotic Arm Elbow

Relatively warmer daytime temperatures on Mars have allowed the biobarrier -- a shiny, protective film -- to peel away a little more from the robotic arm of NASA's Phoenix Mars Lander.
Relatively warmer daytime temperatures on Mars have allowed the biobarrier -- a shiny, protective film -- to peel away a little more from the robotic arm of NASA's Phoenix Mars Lander.

Protective Film Moves Aside

This is an enhanced-color image from Mars Reconnaissance Orbiter's High Resolution Imaging Science Experiment (HiRISE) camera. It shows the NASA's Mars Phoenix lander with its solar panels deployed on the Mars surface
This is an enhanced-color image from Mars Reconnaissance Orbiter's High Resolution Imaging Science Experiment (HiRISE) camera. It shows the NASA's Mars Phoenix lander with its solar panels deployed on the Mars surface

Color Image of Phoenix Lander on Mars Surface

This image zooms in on the backshell and parachute, about 300 meters to the south of NASA's Phoenix Mars Lander. In the distance, about 9 miles or 15 kilometers away, is a range of hills..
This image zooms in on the backshell and parachute, about 300 meters to the south of NASA's Phoenix Mars Lander. In the distance, about 9 miles or 15 kilometers away, is a range of hills..

Animation Showing Backshell and Parachute

This image shows the vast plains of the northern polar region of Mars, as seen by NASA's Phoenix Mars Lander shortly after touching down on the Red Planet. The flat landscape is strewn with tiny pebbles and shows polygonal cracking.
This image shows the vast plains of the northern polar region of Mars, as seen by NASA's Phoenix Mars Lander shortly after touching down on the Red Planet. The flat landscape is strewn with tiny pebbles and shows polygonal cracking.

Looking out Across the Martian Polar Plains

This topography map illustrates where NASA's Phoenix Mars Lander was targeted to land on May 25, 2008, based on expectations as of noon pacific time (3 p.m. eastern time), May 24, 2008.
This topography map illustrates where NASA's Phoenix Mars Lander was targeted to land on May 25, 2008, based on expectations as of noon pacific time (3 p.m. eastern time), May 24, 2008.

Phoenix on Target

During four months prior to the fourth anniversary of its landing on Mars, NASA's Mars Exploration Rover Opportunity examined rocks inside an alcove called 'Duck Bay' in the western portion of Victoria Crater.
During four months prior to the fourth anniversary of its landing on Mars, NASA's Mars Exploration Rover Opportunity examined rocks inside an alcove called 'Duck Bay' in the western portion of Victoria Crater.

'Lyell' Panorama inside Victoria Crater

This anaglyph from NASA's Mars Reconnaissance Orbiter spacecraft, shows that Eberswalde Delta contains river meanders, which indicate that flowing water was present for an extended period of time. 3D glasses are necessary to view this image.
This anaglyph from NASA's Mars Reconnaissance Orbiter spacecraft, shows that Eberswalde Delta contains river meanders, which indicate that flowing water was present for an extended period of time. 3D glasses are necessary to view this image.

Stereo Anaglyphs of River Meanders in Eberswalde Delta

Two Martian southern mid-latitude craters have new light-toned deposit that formed in gully settings during the course of the Mars Global Surveyor mission.
Two Martian southern mid-latitude craters have new light-toned deposit that formed in gully settings during the course of the Mars Global Surveyor mission.

New Gully Deposit in a Crater in the Centauri Montes Region

This 360-degree color view, called the 'McMurdo' panorama, comes from the panoramic camera aboard NASA's Mars Exploration Rover Spirit. From April through October 2006, Spirit has stayed on a small hill known as 'Low Ridge.' 3D glasses are necessary.
This 360-degree color view, called the 'McMurdo' panorama, comes from the panoramic camera aboard NASA's Mars Exploration Rover Spirit. From April through October 2006, Spirit has stayed on a small hill known as 'Low Ridge.' 3D glasses are necessary.

'McMurdo' Panorama from Spirit's 'Winter Haven' (Color Stereo)

This anaglyph from from NASA's Mars Exploration Rover Opportunity is of Victoria crater, looking north from 'Duck Bay' towards the dramatic promontory called 'Cape Verde.' 3D glasses are necessary to view this image.
This anaglyph from from NASA's Mars Exploration Rover Opportunity is of Victoria crater, looking north from 'Duck Bay' towards the dramatic promontory called 'Cape Verde.' 3D glasses are necessary to view this image.

Layers of 'Cape Verde' in 'Victoria Crater' (Stereo)

NASA's Mars rover Opportunity reached the rim of 'Victoria Crater' in Mars' Meridiani Planum region on Sept. 26, 2006. 3D glasses are necessary to view this image.
NASA's Mars rover Opportunity reached the rim of 'Victoria Crater' in Mars' Meridiani Planum region on Sept. 26, 2006. 3D glasses are necessary to view this image.

On the Rim of 'Victoria Crater' (Stereo)

A drive of about 30 meters (about 100 feet) on Sept. 25, 2006 brought NASA's Mars Exploration Rover Opportunity to within about 20 meters (about 66 feet) of the rim of 'Victoria Crater.' 3D glasses are necessary to view this image.
A drive of about 30 meters (about 100 feet) on Sept. 25, 2006 brought NASA's Mars Exploration Rover Opportunity to within about 20 meters (about 66 feet) of the rim of 'Victoria Crater.' 3D glasses are necessary to view this image.

'Victoria' After Sol 950 Drive (Stereo)

This anaglyph from NASA's Mars Exploration Rover Opportunity at the rim of Victoria Crater. 3D glasses are necessary to view this image.
This anaglyph from NASA's Mars Exploration Rover Opportunity at the rim of Victoria Crater. 3D glasses are necessary to view this image.

Pancam Peek into 'Victoria Crater' (Stereo)

NASA's Mars Exploration Rover Spirit used its panoramic camera (Pancam) to record a 360-degree vista, dubbed the 'Everest' panorama, from the top of 'Husband Hill' in early October 2005. 3D glasses are necessary to view this image.
NASA's Mars Exploration Rover Spirit used its panoramic camera (Pancam) to record a 360-degree vista, dubbed the 'Everest' panorama, from the top of 'Husband Hill' in early October 2005. 3D glasses are necessary to view this image.

Stereo Version of Spirit's 'Everest' Panorama

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