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The robotic arm on NASA's Mars rover Curiosity delivered a sample of Martian soil to the rover's observation tray for the first time during the mission's 70th Martian day, or sol (Oct. 16, 2012).
The robotic arm on NASA's Mars rover Curiosity delivered a sample of Martian soil to the rover's observation tray for the first time during the mission's 70th Martian day, or sol (Oct. 16, 2012).

First Sample Placed on Curiosity's Observation Tray

As the last step in a series of inspections of the Mars Hand Lens Imager (MAHLI) aboard NASA's Mars rover Curiosity, this camera's reclosable dust cover was opened for the first time on Sept. 8, 2012.
As the last step in a series of inspections of the Mars Hand Lens Imager (MAHLI) aboard NASA's Mars rover Curiosity, this camera's reclosable dust cover was opened for the first time on Sept. 8, 2012.

Martian Ground Seen by Arm Camera With and Without Dust Cover (Thumbnails)

This map shows the frequency of carbon dioxide frost's presence at sunrise on Mars, as a percentage of days year-round, based on data from NASA's Mars Reconnaissance Orbiter.
This map shows the frequency of carbon dioxide frost's presence at sunrise on Mars, as a percentage of days year-round, based on data from NASA's Mars Reconnaissance Orbiter.

Where on Mars Does Carbon Dioxide Frost Form Often?

The Chemistry and Camera (ChemCam) instrument on NASA's Mars rover Curiosity used its laser and spectrometers to examine what chemical elements are in a drift of Martian sand during the mission's 74th Martian day, or sol (Oct. 20, 2012).
The Chemistry and Camera (ChemCam) instrument on NASA's Mars rover Curiosity used its laser and spectrometers to examine what chemical elements are in a drift of Martian sand during the mission's 74th Martian day, or sol (Oct. 20, 2012).

Laser Hit on Martian Sand Target, Before and After

Two donut-shaped tracks make an infinity symbol, and mark the first two drives of NASA's Curiosity rover. The landing site is at the far right.
Two donut-shaped tracks make an infinity symbol, and mark the first two drives of NASA's Curiosity rover. The landing site is at the far right.

From Infinity and Beyond

The Curiosity engineering team created this cylindrical projection view from images taken by NASA's Curiosity rover rear hazard avoidance cameras underneath the rover deck on Sol 0. Pictured here are the 'pigeon-toed' wheels in their stowed position from
The Curiosity engineering team created this cylindrical projection view from images taken by NASA's Curiosity rover rear hazard avoidance cameras underneath the rover deck on Sol 0. Pictured here are the 'pigeon-toed' wheels in their stowed position from

A View From Below the Rover Deck

This NASA Spirit image view is toward the south, looking down at Spirit's rear wheels. It is one of a series of wide-angle views shown one after the other. Go to the Photojournal to view the animation.
This NASA Spirit image view is toward the south, looking down at Spirit's rear wheels. It is one of a series of wide-angle views shown one after the other. Go to the Photojournal to view the animation.

Rear Camera View of Backward Drive, Sols 2145-2154

Comet Siding Spring will have a close approach to Mars on Oct. 19, 2014. This artist's concept shows people in the Southern Hemisphere where to look for Mars in the night sky. Mars and the comet may be visible with binoculars.
Comet Siding Spring will have a close approach to Mars on Oct. 19, 2014. This artist's concept shows people in the Southern Hemisphere where to look for Mars in the night sky. Mars and the comet may be visible with binoculars.

View of Comet Siding Spring from Southern Hemisphere (Artist's Concept)

The dunes in this image from NASA's 2001 Mars Odyssey spacecraft are still partial covered in frost. They will get darker and darker as the frost is removed and the underlying dark material is completely exposed.
The dunes in this image from NASA's 2001 Mars Odyssey spacecraft are still partial covered in frost. They will get darker and darker as the frost is removed and the underlying dark material is completely exposed.

Frosted Dunes

Layering in south polar ice is easy to see in this outlier of the main polar cap. This image was captured by NASA's Mars Odyssey.
Layering in south polar ice is easy to see in this outlier of the main polar cap. This image was captured by NASA's Mars Odyssey.

South Polar Layers

This nearly global mosaic of observations from NASA's Mars Reconnaissance Orbiter on Nov. 18, 2012, shows a dust storm in Mars' southern hemisphere. Small white arrows outline the area where dust from the storm is apparent in the atmosphere.
This nearly global mosaic of observations from NASA's Mars Reconnaissance Orbiter on Nov. 18, 2012, shows a dust storm in Mars' southern hemisphere. Small white arrows outline the area where dust from the storm is apparent in the atmosphere.

Martian Dust Storm, Nov. 18, 2012

This channel is located in the volcanic flows north of Olympus Mons as seen by NASA's Mars Odyssey.
This channel is located in the volcanic flows north of Olympus Mons as seen by NASA's Mars Odyssey.

Channels

This image from NASA's 2001 Mars Odyssey shows the sand sheet with dune forms located on the floor of Rabe Crater.
This image from NASA's 2001 Mars Odyssey shows the sand sheet with dune forms located on the floor of Rabe Crater.

Rabe Crater Dunes

This image captured by NASA's Mars Odyssey shows layering in the south polar cap.
This image captured by NASA's Mars Odyssey shows layering in the south polar cap.

South Polar Layers

This image from NASA's Mars Odyssey show regions of densely coalesced dunes, common around the North Polar cap of Mars.
This image from NASA's Mars Odyssey show regions of densely coalesced dunes, common around the North Polar cap of Mars.

North Polar Dunes

This hole, with a diameter slightly smaller than a U.S. dime, was drilled by NASA's Curiosity Mars rover into a rock target called 'Telegraph Peak.' The rock is located within the basal layer of Mount Sharp. The hole was drilled on Feb. 24, 2015.
This hole, with a diameter slightly smaller than a U.S. dime, was drilled by NASA's Curiosity Mars rover into a rock target called 'Telegraph Peak.' The rock is located within the basal layer of Mount Sharp. The hole was drilled on Feb. 24, 2015.

Hole at 'Telegraph Peak' Drilled by Mars Rover Curiosity

This view of 'Intrepid' crater, about 20 meters (66 feet) in diameter, is a mosaic of images taken by the navigation camera on NASA's Mars Exploration Rover Opportunity. The view spans 180 degrees and is centered toward the east.
This view of 'Intrepid' crater, about 20 meters (66 feet) in diameter, is a mosaic of images taken by the navigation camera on NASA's Mars Exploration Rover Opportunity. The view spans 180 degrees and is centered toward the east.

'Intrepid' Crater on Opportunity's Martian Trek

The small channels in this image of Utopia Planitia are south of Granicus Valles were captured by NASA's Mars Odyssey on July 23, 2010.
The small channels in this image of Utopia Planitia are south of Granicus Valles were captured by NASA's Mars Odyssey on July 23, 2010.

Utopia Planitia

This image of windstreaks from NASA's 2001 Mars Odyssey spacecraft indicates winds from the ENE in the region of Syrtis Major Planum.
This image of windstreaks from NASA's 2001 Mars Odyssey spacecraft indicates winds from the ENE in the region of Syrtis Major Planum.

Windstreaks in Syrtis Major Planum

This image from NASA's Mars Odyssey shows lava flows of Alba Mons and windstreaks behind craters in the area. Windstreak tail directions indicate winds from the East and East-Northeast.
This image from NASA's Mars Odyssey shows lava flows of Alba Mons and windstreaks behind craters in the area. Windstreak tail directions indicate winds from the East and East-Northeast.

Wind and Rock

This image from NASA's Mars Odyssey shows part of the summit caldera of Ceraunius Tholus, one of the smaller volcanoes of the Tharsis region.
This image from NASA's Mars Odyssey shows part of the summit caldera of Ceraunius Tholus, one of the smaller volcanoes of the Tharsis region.

Ceraunius Tholus

This image of Candor Chasma taken by NASA's 2001 Mars Odyssey contains eroded deposits of material and a large landslide deposit. Gravity, wind, and water all played a role in shaping the landforms we see in this image.
This image of Candor Chasma taken by NASA's 2001 Mars Odyssey contains eroded deposits of material and a large landslide deposit. Gravity, wind, and water all played a role in shaping the landforms we see in this image.

Candor Chasma

This image from NASA's Mars Reconnaissance Orbiter shows a swath of a debris apron east of Hellas Basin. Features like this are often found surrounding isolated mountains in this area. Original release date March 3, 2010.
This image from NASA's Mars Reconnaissance Orbiter shows a swath of a debris apron east of Hellas Basin. Features like this are often found surrounding isolated mountains in this area. Original release date March 3, 2010.

Craters on an Ice-Rich D├ębris Apron

Ius Chasma is one of several canyons that make up Valles Marineris, the largest canyon system in the Solar System as seen by NASA's Mars Reconnaissance Orbiter.
Ius Chasma is one of several canyons that make up Valles Marineris, the largest canyon system in the Solar System as seen by NASA's Mars Reconnaissance Orbiter.

Floor of Ius Chasma

This image from NASA's Curiosity shows a scoop full of sand and dust lifted by the rover's first use of the scoop on its robotic arm. In the foreground, near bottom of this image, the bright object visible on the ground might be a piece of rover hardware.
This image from NASA's Curiosity shows a scoop full of sand and dust lifted by the rover's first use of the scoop on its robotic arm. In the foreground, near bottom of this image, the bright object visible on the ground might be a piece of rover hardware.

View of Curiosity's First Scoop Also Shows Bright Object

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