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This graph compares the elemental composition of typical soils at three landing regions on Mars: Gusev Crater, from Spirit; Meridiani Planum, from Opportunity; and now Gale Crater, where NASA's newest Curiosity rover is currently investigating.
This graph compares the elemental composition of typical soils at three landing regions on Mars: Gusev Crater, from Spirit; Meridiani Planum, from Opportunity; and now Gale Crater, where NASA's newest Curiosity rover is currently investigating.

Inspecting Soils Across Mars

The lava channels in this image from NASA's 2001 Mars Odyssey spacecraft are located on the northern flank of Ascraeus Mons.
The lava channels in this image from NASA's 2001 Mars Odyssey spacecraft are located on the northern flank of Ascraeus Mons.

Lava Channels

This image shows a portion of Utopia Planitia that is covered by dust devil tracks as seen by NASA's 2001 Mars Odyssey spacecraft.
This image shows a portion of Utopia Planitia that is covered by dust devil tracks as seen by NASA's 2001 Mars Odyssey spacecraft.

Utopia Planitia

This view of channels on Mars came from NASA's Mariner 9 orbiter. In 1971, Mariner 9 became the first spacecraft to enter orbit around Mars.
This view of channels on Mars came from NASA's Mariner 9 orbiter. In 1971, Mariner 9 became the first spacecraft to enter orbit around Mars.

Mariner 9 View of Nirgal Vallis

Dunes on the floor of Russell Crater vary from individual dunes, to a large hook shaped, towering sand sheet as seen by NASA's Mars Odyssey.
Dunes on the floor of Russell Crater vary from individual dunes, to a large hook shaped, towering sand sheet as seen by NASA's Mars Odyssey.

Russell Crater Dunes

The THEMIS VIS camera contains 5 filters. Data from different filters can be combined in ways to create a false color image. This image from NASA's 2001 Mars Odyssey spacecraft shows the rim and ejecta of an unnamed crater northwest of Hesperia Planum.
The THEMIS VIS camera contains 5 filters. Data from different filters can be combined in ways to create a false color image. This image from NASA's 2001 Mars Odyssey spacecraft shows the rim and ejecta of an unnamed crater northwest of Hesperia Planum.

Hesperia Planum - False Color

This series of images from NASA's Mars Reconnaissance Orbiter successively zooms into 'spider' features, or channels carved in the surface in radial patterns, in the south polar region of Mars.
This series of images from NASA's Mars Reconnaissance Orbiter successively zooms into 'spider' features, or channels carved in the surface in radial patterns, in the south polar region of Mars.

Volunteers Help Decide Where to Point Mars Camera

This illustration portrays possible ways methane might be added to Mars' atmosphere (sources) and removed from the atmosphere (sinks). NASA's Curiosity Mars rover has detected fluctuations in methane concentration in the atmosphere.
This illustration portrays possible ways methane might be added to Mars' atmosphere (sources) and removed from the atmosphere (sinks). NASA's Curiosity Mars rover has detected fluctuations in methane concentration in the atmosphere.

Possible Methane Sources and Sinks

This false color image captured by NASA's 2001 Mars Odyssey spacecraft shows part of Claritas Fossae.
This false color image captured by NASA's 2001 Mars Odyssey spacecraft shows part of Claritas Fossae.

Claritas Fossae False Color

The dunes in this image captured by NASA's 2001 Mars Odyssey spacecraft are part of Olympia Undae.
The dunes in this image captured by NASA's 2001 Mars Odyssey spacecraft are part of Olympia Undae.

Olympia Undae

These two images come from the HiRISE camera on NASA's Mars Reconnaissance Orbiter. Images of locations in Gale Crater taken from orbit around Mars reveal evidence of erosion in recent geological times and development of small scarps, or vertical surfaces
These two images come from the HiRISE camera on NASA's Mars Reconnaissance Orbiter. Images of locations in Gale Crater taken from orbit around Mars reveal evidence of erosion in recent geological times and development of small scarps, or vertical surfaces

Erosion Patterns May Guide Mars Rover to Rocks Recently Exposed

This image captured by NASA's 2001 Mars Odyssey spacecraft shows a small portion of the lava flows that comprise Daedalia Planum.
This image captured by NASA's 2001 Mars Odyssey spacecraft shows a small portion of the lava flows that comprise Daedalia Planum.

Daedalia Planum

This image captured by NASA's 2001 Mars Odyssey spacecraft shows part of the dune field on the floor of Proctor Crater.
This image captured by NASA's 2001 Mars Odyssey spacecraft shows part of the dune field on the floor of Proctor Crater.

Proctor Crater Dunes

This colorful scene is situated in the Noctis Labyrinthus, perched high on the Tharsis rise in the upper reaches of the Valles Marineris canyon system as seen by NASA's Mars Reconnaissance Orbiter.
This colorful scene is situated in the Noctis Labyrinthus, perched high on the Tharsis rise in the upper reaches of the Valles Marineris canyon system as seen by NASA's Mars Reconnaissance Orbiter.

Two Generations of Windblown Sediments

Dark slope streaks are common throughout the ridges that comprise Lycus Sulci in this image captured by NASA's 2001 Mars Odyssey spacecraft.
Dark slope streaks are common throughout the ridges that comprise Lycus Sulci in this image captured by NASA's 2001 Mars Odyssey spacecraft.

Lycus Sulci

This image from NASA's 2001 Mars Odyssey spacecraft is of Lycus Sulci, located on the western side of Olympus Mons and dominated by multi-direction ridges which contains material less resistant than the ridges to the effects of wind.
This image from NASA's 2001 Mars Odyssey spacecraft is of Lycus Sulci, located on the western side of Olympus Mons and dominated by multi-direction ridges which contains material less resistant than the ridges to the effects of wind.

Lycus Sulci

Huge gullies, like these captured by NASA's 2001 Mars Odyssey, line both rims of Ius Chasma.
Huge gullies, like these captured by NASA's 2001 Mars Odyssey, line both rims of Ius Chasma.

Gullies in Ius Chasma

Windstreaks are a common feature on the surface of Daedalia Planum volcanic flows. This image was captured by NASA's Mars Odyssey.
Windstreaks are a common feature on the surface of Daedalia Planum volcanic flows. This image was captured by NASA's Mars Odyssey.

Windstreaks

This stereo mosaic of images from NASA's Mars Exploration Rover Opportunity shows surroundings of the rover's location following an 93.3-meter (306-foot) drive east-northeastward on Oct. 6, 2010. 3D glasses are necessary to view this image.
This stereo mosaic of images from NASA's Mars Exploration Rover Opportunity shows surroundings of the rover's location following an 93.3-meter (306-foot) drive east-northeastward on Oct. 6, 2010. 3D glasses are necessary to view this image.

Opportunity's Eastward View After Sol 2382 Drive (Stereo)

These dark dunes captured by NASA's 2001 Mars Odyssey are located on the floor of Danielson Crater in Meridiani Planum.
These dark dunes captured by NASA's 2001 Mars Odyssey are located on the floor of Danielson Crater in Meridiani Planum.

Danielson Crater Dunes

NASA's Mars Exploration Rover Opportunity has found a rock that apparently is another meteorite, less than three weeks after driving away from a larger meteorite that the rover examined for six weeks.
NASA's Mars Exploration Rover Opportunity has found a rock that apparently is another meteorite, less than three weeks after driving away from a larger meteorite that the rover examined for six weeks.

Opportunity Finds Another Meteorite

The Compact Reconnaissance Imaging Spectrometer for Mars, an instrument on NASA's Mars Reconnaissance Orbiter, obtained information confirming material excavated by a fresh impact and Identified as water ice.
The Compact Reconnaissance Imaging Spectrometer for Mars, an instrument on NASA's Mars Reconnaissance Orbiter, obtained information confirming material excavated by a fresh impact and Identified as water ice.

Material Excavated by a Fresh Impact and Identified as Water Ice

This image from NASA's Mars Reconnaissance Orbiter is part of a proposed landing site in Aram Dorsum for the ExoMars Rover, planned for launch in 2018. Upper layers of light toned sediments have been eroded, leaving a lower surface which appears dark.
This image from NASA's Mars Reconnaissance Orbiter is part of a proposed landing site in Aram Dorsum for the ExoMars Rover, planned for launch in 2018. Upper layers of light toned sediments have been eroded, leaving a lower surface which appears dark.

A Possible Landing Site for the ExoMars Rover in Aram Dorsum

This image is of a portion of the Southern plains region within Hellas, the largest impact basin on Mars, with a diameter of about 2300 kilometers (1400 miles), as observed by NASA's Mars Reconnaissance Orbiter.
This image is of a portion of the Southern plains region within Hellas, the largest impact basin on Mars, with a diameter of about 2300 kilometers (1400 miles), as observed by NASA's Mars Reconnaissance Orbiter.

Pitted Landforms in Southern Hellas Planitia

Several terrain types converge in this scene observed by NASA's Mars Reconnaissance Orbiter from Arsinoes Chaos, in the far eastern portions of Valles Marineris.
Several terrain types converge in this scene observed by NASA's Mars Reconnaissance Orbiter from Arsinoes Chaos, in the far eastern portions of Valles Marineris.

Yardangs in Arsinoes Chaos, Mars

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