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NASA's Mars Reconnaissance Orbiter shows Mars' northern-most sand dunes beginning to emerge from their winter cover of seasonal carbon dioxide (dry) ice. Dark, bare south-facing slopes are soaking up the warmth of the sun.
NASA's Mars Reconnaissance Orbiter shows Mars' northern-most sand dunes beginning to emerge from their winter cover of seasonal carbon dioxide (dry) ice. Dark, bare south-facing slopes are soaking up the warmth of the sun.

Sand Dunes in Spring

This color view of the parachute and back shell that helped deliver NASA's Curiosity rover to the surface of the Red Planet was taken by the High-HiRISE camera on NASA's Mars Reconnaissance Orbiter.
This color view of the parachute and back shell that helped deliver NASA's Curiosity rover to the surface of the Red Planet was taken by the High-HiRISE camera on NASA's Mars Reconnaissance Orbiter.

Relics of Rover's Landing

NASA's Mars Reconnaissance Orbiter captured this image on 27 June 2014, when Curiosity had just crossed the edge of the 3-sigma landing.
NASA's Mars Reconnaissance Orbiter captured this image on 27 June 2014, when Curiosity had just crossed the edge of the 3-sigma landing.

Curiosity Offside!

Towards the top of this image from NASA's 2001 Mars Odyssey spacecraft is a 'T' shaped depression and two sections of narrow channel located on the northeast part of the Elysium Mons volcanic complex. Fluids (like water, or lava) flow downhill.
Towards the top of this image from NASA's 2001 Mars Odyssey spacecraft is a 'T' shaped depression and two sections of narrow channel located on the northeast part of the Elysium Mons volcanic complex. Fluids (like water, or lava) flow downhill.

Which Came First?

NASA's Opportunity had driven 72.3 meters southward (237 feet) on June 10. Engineers drove the rover backward as a strategy to counteract an increase in the amount of current drawn by the drive motor of the right-front wheel. 3D glasses are necessary.
NASA's Opportunity had driven 72.3 meters southward (237 feet) on June 10. Engineers drove the rover backward as a strategy to counteract an increase in the amount of current drawn by the drive motor of the right-front wheel. 3D glasses are necessary.

Opportunity's View After 72-Meter Drive, Sol 1912 (Stereo)

The channel crossing this image from NASA's 2001 Mars Odyssey spacecraft is called Ma'adim Valles.
The channel crossing this image from NASA's 2001 Mars Odyssey spacecraft is called Ma'adim Valles.

Ma'adim Valles

This scene from the panoramic camera (Pancam) on NASA's Mars Exploration Rover Opportunity catches 'Pillinger Point,' on the western rim of Endeavour Crater, in the foreground.
This scene from the panoramic camera (Pancam) on NASA's Mars Exploration Rover Opportunity catches 'Pillinger Point,' on the western rim of Endeavour Crater, in the foreground.

'Pillinger Point' Overlooking Endeavour Crater on Mars

A graben is a downdropped block of material bounded on both sides by faults. The graben in this image from NASA's 2001 Mars Odyssey spacecraft follows the trend of the nearby Sirenum Fossae graben.
A graben is a downdropped block of material bounded on both sides by faults. The graben in this image from NASA's 2001 Mars Odyssey spacecraft follows the trend of the nearby Sirenum Fossae graben.

Graben

The High Resolution Imaging Science Experiment (HiRISE) camera on NASA's Mars Reconnaissance Orbiter took two images of the larger of Mars' two moons, Phobos, within 10 minutes of each other on March 23, 2008. This is the first.
The High Resolution Imaging Science Experiment (HiRISE) camera on NASA's Mars Reconnaissance Orbiter took two images of the larger of Mars' two moons, Phobos, within 10 minutes of each other on March 23, 2008. This is the first.

Phobos from 6,800 Kilometers (Color)

This false-color scene from the panoramic camera (Pancam) on NASA's Mars Exploration Rover Opportunity catches 'Pillinger Point,' on the western rim of Endeavour Crater, in the foreground.
This false-color scene from the panoramic camera (Pancam) on NASA's Mars Exploration Rover Opportunity catches 'Pillinger Point,' on the western rim of Endeavour Crater, in the foreground.

'Pillinger Point' Overlooking Endeavour Crater on Mars (False Color)

This image taken by NASA's 2001 Mars Odyssey spacecraft shows a portion of Scamander Vallis. Dark slope streaks are also visible on the west-facing wall of the channel.
This image taken by NASA's 2001 Mars Odyssey spacecraft shows a portion of Scamander Vallis. Dark slope streaks are also visible on the west-facing wall of the channel.

Scamander Vallis

NASA's Opportunity had driven 62.5 meters (205 feet) that sol, southward away from an outcrop called 'Penrhyn,' which the rover had been examining for a few sols, and toward a crater called 'Adventure.' 3D glasses are necessary to view this image.
NASA's Opportunity had driven 62.5 meters (205 feet) that sol, southward away from an outcrop called 'Penrhyn,' which the rover had been examining for a few sols, and toward a crater called 'Adventure.' 3D glasses are necessary to view this image.

Opportunity's Surroundings After Backwards Drive, Sol 1850 (Stereo)

This 360-degree panorama shows the vista from the location where NASA's Mars Exploration Rover Spirit has spent its third Martian southern-hemisphere winter inside Mars' Gusev Crater. 3D glasses are necessary to view this image.
This 360-degree panorama shows the vista from the location where NASA's Mars Exploration Rover Spirit has spent its third Martian southern-hemisphere winter inside Mars' Gusev Crater. 3D glasses are necessary to view this image.

Full-Circle 'Bonestell' Panorama from Spirit (Stereo)

NASA's Mars Pathfinder Lander, Sojourner, made contact with the rock 'Yogi' in this false-color image from 1997, taken with the Imager for Mars Pathfinder (IMP).
NASA's Mars Pathfinder Lander, Sojourner, made contact with the rock 'Yogi' in this false-color image from 1997, taken with the Imager for Mars Pathfinder (IMP).

'Yogi' in False Color

Why are these dunes different colors? Sand on Mars is typically dark in tone, as it commonly derived from volcanic rocks like lava flows as shown by NASA's Mars Reconnaissance Orbiter.
Why are these dunes different colors? Sand on Mars is typically dark in tone, as it commonly derived from volcanic rocks like lava flows as shown by NASA's Mars Reconnaissance Orbiter.

Two-Color Dunes in Meridiani Terra

NASA's Mars Reconnaissance Orbiter reveals that gullies, or ravines, are landforms commonly found in the mid-latitudes on Mars, particularly in the Southern highlands.
NASA's Mars Reconnaissance Orbiter reveals that gullies, or ravines, are landforms commonly found in the mid-latitudes on Mars, particularly in the Southern highlands.

A New Gully Channel in Terra Sirenum

This observation captured by NASA's Mars Reconnaissance Orbiter shows a small crater in within the much larger Pollack Crater containing light-toned material.
This observation captured by NASA's Mars Reconnaissance Orbiter shows a small crater in within the much larger Pollack Crater containing light-toned material.

Small Crater within Pollack Crater Containing Light-Toned Material

This stereo view combines a pair of images taken by the microscopic imager on NASA's Mars Exploration Rover Spirit during the 1,925th Martian day (sol) of Spirit's mission on Mars (June 2, 2009). 3D glasses are necessary to view this image.
This stereo view combines a pair of images taken by the microscopic imager on NASA's Mars Exploration Rover Spirit during the 1,925th Martian day (sol) of Spirit's mission on Mars (June 2, 2009). 3D glasses are necessary to view this image.

Spirit's View of Own Underbelly, (Sol 1925 Stereo)

This stereo scene combines frames taken by the navigation camera on NASA's Mars Exploration Rover Spirit during the 1,891st Martian day, or sol, of Spirit's mission on Mars (April 28, 2009). You will need 3-D glasses to view this image.
This stereo scene combines frames taken by the navigation camera on NASA's Mars Exploration Rover Spirit during the 1,891st Martian day, or sol, of Spirit's mission on Mars (April 28, 2009). You will need 3-D glasses to view this image.

Spirit's View from "Troy" (Stereo)

This stereo scene combines frames taken by the navigation camera on NASA's Mars Exploration Rover Spirit during the 1,871st Martian day, or sol, of Spirit's mission on Mars (April 8, 2009). You will need 3-D glasses to view this image.
This stereo scene combines frames taken by the navigation camera on NASA's Mars Exploration Rover Spirit during the 1,871st Martian day, or sol, of Spirit's mission on Mars (April 8, 2009). You will need 3-D glasses to view this image.

Spirit Close to "Troy," Sol 1871 (Stereo)

NASA's Mars Exploration Rover Spirit took these images that have been combined into this stereo, 180-degree view of the rover's surroundings on March 23, 2009. 3D glasses are necessary to view this image.
NASA's Mars Exploration Rover Spirit took these images that have been combined into this stereo, 180-degree view of the rover's surroundings on March 23, 2009. 3D glasses are necessary to view this image.

New Record Five-Wheel Drive, Spirit's Sol 1856 (Stereo)

NASA's Mars Exploration Rover Opportunity used its navigation camera to take the images combined into this stereo 180-degree view on Feb. 13, 2009. 3D glasses are necessary to view this image.
NASA's Mars Exploration Rover Opportunity used its navigation camera to take the images combined into this stereo 180-degree view on Feb. 13, 2009. 3D glasses are necessary to view this image.

Opportunity's Surroundings on Sol 1798 (Stereo)

NASA's Mars Exploration Rover Opportunity combined images into this full-circle view of the rover's surroundings. Tracks from the rover's drive recede northward across dark-toned sand ripples in the Meridiani Planum region of Mars. You need 3D glasses.
NASA's Mars Exploration Rover Opportunity combined images into this full-circle view of the rover's surroundings. Tracks from the rover's drive recede northward across dark-toned sand ripples in the Meridiani Planum region of Mars. You need 3D glasses.

Opportunity's View on Sols 1803 and 1804 (Stereo)

On September 28, 2008, NASA's Mars rover Opportunity reached this location on the west side of 'Victoria Crater.' 3D glasses are necessary.
On September 28, 2008, NASA's Mars rover Opportunity reached this location on the west side of 'Victoria Crater.' 3D glasses are necessary.

View from West of Victoria Crater, Sol 1664 (Stereo)

This anaglyph, acquired by NASA's Phoenix Lander's Surface Stereo Imager on June 8, 2008, shows a stereoscopic 3D view of the Martian surface near the lander. 3D glasses are necessary.
This anaglyph, acquired by NASA's Phoenix Lander's Surface Stereo Imager on June 8, 2008, shows a stereoscopic 3D view of the Martian surface near the lander. 3D glasses are necessary.

Martian Surface as Seen by Phoenix

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