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The pits visible in this image from NASA's Mars Reconnaissance Orbiter aren't impact craters. The material they are embedded into is ejecta (stuff thrown out of an impact crater when it forms) from a large crater called Hale not seen in this image.
The pits visible in this image from NASA's Mars Reconnaissance Orbiter aren't impact craters. The material they are embedded into is ejecta (stuff thrown out of an impact crater when it forms) from a large crater called Hale not seen in this image.

Pits in Hale Crater Ejecta

The pits visible in this image from NASA's Mars Reconnaissance Orbiter aren't impact craters. The material they are embedded into is ejecta (stuff thrown out of an impact crater when it forms) from a large crater called Hale not seen in this image.

Target: Mars
Mission: Mars Reconnaissance Orbiter (MRO)
Spacecraft: Mars Reconnaissance Orbiter (MRO)
Instrument: High Resolution Imaging Science Experiment (HiRISE)
ID#: PIA19289
Added: 2015-01-28

Views: 59

Pits in Hale Crater Ejecta

The pits visible in this image from NASA's Mars Reconnaissance Orbiter aren't impact craters. The material they are embedded into is ejecta (stuff thrown out of an impact crater when it forms) from a large crater called Hale not seen in this image.

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In this observation from NASA's Mars Reconnaissance Orbiter made for a study of ancient craters, we see the craters filled with smooth material that has subsequently degraded into scallops. These formations might be possibly due to ground ice sublimation.
In this observation from NASA's Mars Reconnaissance Orbiter made for a study of ancient craters, we see the craters filled with smooth material that has subsequently degraded into scallops. These formations might be possibly due to ground ice sublimation.

Filled Crater and Scallops

In this observation from NASA's Mars Reconnaissance Orbiter made for a study of ancient craters, we see the craters filled with smooth material that has subsequently degraded into scallops. These formations might be possibly due to ground ice sublimation.

Target: Mars
Mission: Mars Reconnaissance Orbiter (MRO)
Spacecraft: Mars Reconnaissance Orbiter (MRO)
Instrument: High Resolution Imaging Science Experiment (HiRISE)
ID#: PIA19288
Added: 2015-01-28

Views: 47

Filled Crater and Scallops

In this observation from NASA's Mars Reconnaissance Orbiter made for a study of ancient craters, we see the craters filled with smooth material that has subsequently degraded into scallops. These formations might be possibly due to ground ice sublimation.

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The terrain in this observation from NASA's Mars Reconnaissance Orbiter looks like an ancient uplifted crustal block. The area is riddled with faults (big cracks that allow rocks to slide) and ridges that look like uncovered magma dikes.
The terrain in this observation from NASA's Mars Reconnaissance Orbiter looks like an ancient uplifted crustal block. The area is riddled with faults (big cracks that allow rocks to slide) and ridges that look like uncovered magma dikes.

Higher Terrain between Sinai and Solis Plana

The terrain in this observation from NASA's Mars Reconnaissance Orbiter looks like an ancient uplifted crustal block. The area is riddled with faults (big cracks that allow rocks to slide) and ridges that look like uncovered magma dikes.

Target: Mars
Mission: Mars Reconnaissance Orbiter (MRO)
Spacecraft: Mars Reconnaissance Orbiter (MRO)
Instrument: High Resolution Imaging Science Experiment (HiRISE)
ID#: PIA19287
Added: 2015-01-28

Views: 38

Higher Terrain between Sinai and Solis Plana

The terrain in this observation from NASA's Mars Reconnaissance Orbiter looks like an ancient uplifted crustal block. The area is riddled with faults (big cracks that allow rocks to slide) and ridges that look like uncovered magma dikes.

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This image from NASA's Mars Reconnaissance Orbiter shows several seemingly active gullies and their associated fans near the Argyre region.
This image from NASA's Mars Reconnaissance Orbiter shows several seemingly active gullies and their associated fans near the Argyre region.

Gullies Old and New Near the Argyre Region

This image from NASA's Mars Reconnaissance Orbiter shows several seemingly active gullies and their associated fans near the Argyre region.

Target: Mars
Mission: Mars Reconnaissance Orbiter (MRO)
Spacecraft: Mars Reconnaissance Orbiter (MRO)
Instrument: High Resolution Imaging Science Experiment (HiRISE)
ID#: PIA19286
Added: 2015-01-28

Views: 36

Gullies Old and New Near the Argyre Region

This image from NASA's Mars Reconnaissance Orbiter shows several seemingly active gullies and their associated fans near the Argyre region.

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NASA's Mars Reconnaissance Orbiter observes the southeast rim of Hale Crater, about 150 kilometers (90 miles) in diameter and located in the mid-southern latitudes just north of the massive Argyre basin.
NASA's Mars Reconnaissance Orbiter observes the southeast rim of Hale Crater, about 150 kilometers (90 miles) in diameter and located in the mid-southern latitudes just north of the massive Argyre basin.

Southeast Rim of Hale Crater

NASA's Mars Reconnaissance Orbiter observes the southeast rim of Hale Crater, about 150 kilometers (90 miles) in diameter and located in the mid-southern latitudes just north of the massive Argyre basin.

Target: Mars
Mission: Mars Reconnaissance Orbiter (MRO)
Spacecraft: Mars Reconnaissance Orbiter (MRO)
Instrument: High Resolution Imaging Science Experiment (HiRISE)
ID#: PIA19176
Added: 2015-01-22

Views: 591

Southeast Rim of Hale Crater

NASA's Mars Reconnaissance Orbiter observes the southeast rim of Hale Crater, about 150 kilometers (90 miles) in diameter and located in the mid-southern latitudes just north of the massive Argyre basin.

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NASA's Mars Reconnaissance Orbiter observes a group of small gullies along a rock layer on the south wall of Liu Hsin Crater. At the foot of the gullies 'fans' of granular sediment have been deposited downhill from the gully formation.
NASA's Mars Reconnaissance Orbiter observes a group of small gullies along a rock layer on the south wall of Liu Hsin Crater. At the foot of the gullies 'fans' of granular sediment have been deposited downhill from the gully formation.

Gullies in Liu Hsin Crater

NASA's Mars Reconnaissance Orbiter observes a group of small gullies along a rock layer on the south wall of Liu Hsin Crater. At the foot of the gullies 'fans' of granular sediment have been deposited downhill from the gully formation.

Target: Mars
Mission: Mars Reconnaissance Orbiter (MRO)
Spacecraft: Mars Reconnaissance Orbiter (MRO)
Instrument: High Resolution Imaging Science Experiment (HiRISE)
ID#: PIA19175
Added: 2015-01-22

Views: 371

Gullies in Liu Hsin Crater

NASA's Mars Reconnaissance Orbiter observes a group of small gullies along a rock layer on the south wall of Liu Hsin Crater. At the foot of the gullies 'fans' of granular sediment have been deposited downhill from the gully formation.

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This observation, taken in June 2014, covers a small 1-kilometer sized simple crater located in the Southern hemisphere in late Martian winter as Mars is heading into spring.
This observation, taken in June 2014, covers a small 1-kilometer sized simple crater located in the Southern hemisphere in late Martian winter as Mars is heading into spring.

Crater Slopes: The Power of a Repeat Image

This observation, taken in June 2014, covers a small 1-kilometer sized simple crater located in the Southern hemisphere in late Martian winter as Mars is heading into spring.

Target: Mars
Mission: Mars Reconnaissance Orbiter (MRO)
Spacecraft: Mars Reconnaissance Orbiter (MRO)
Instrument: High Resolution Imaging Science Experiment (HiRISE)
ID#: PIA19139
Added: 2015-01-22

Views: 320

Crater Slopes: The Power of a Repeat Image

This observation, taken in June 2014, covers a small 1-kilometer sized simple crater located in the Southern hemisphere in late Martian winter as Mars is heading into spring.

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This image from NASA's Mars Mars Reconnaissance Orbiter shows a triple impact crater in Elysium Planitia near Tartarus Montes, which probably formed when a binary-or even triple-asteroid struck the surface.
This image from NASA's Mars Mars Reconnaissance Orbiter shows a triple impact crater in Elysium Planitia near Tartarus Montes, which probably formed when a binary-or even triple-asteroid struck the surface.

Triple-Crater in Elysium Planitia

This image from NASA's Mars Mars Reconnaissance Orbiter shows a triple impact crater in Elysium Planitia near Tartarus Montes, which probably formed when a binary-or even triple-asteroid struck the surface.

Target: Mars
Mission: Mars Reconnaissance Orbiter (MRO)
Spacecraft: Mars Reconnaissance Orbiter (MRO)
Instrument: High Resolution Imaging Science Experiment (HiRISE)
ID#: PIA19138
Added: 2015-01-22

Views: 234

Triple-Crater in Elysium Planitia

This image from NASA's Mars Mars Reconnaissance Orbiter shows a triple impact crater in Elysium Planitia near Tartarus Montes, which probably formed when a binary-or even triple-asteroid struck the surface.

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NASA's Mars Reconnaissance Orbiter shows a bright feature interpreted as the United Kingdom's Beagle 2 Lander, which was never heard from after its expected December 25, 2003, landing.
NASA's Mars Reconnaissance Orbiter shows a bright feature interpreted as the United Kingdom's Beagle 2 Lander, which was never heard from after its expected December 25, 2003, landing.

Beagle 2 Lander Observed by Mars Reconnaissance Orbiter

NASA's Mars Reconnaissance Orbiter shows a bright feature interpreted as the United Kingdom's Beagle 2 Lander, which was never heard from after its expected December 25, 2003, landing.

Target: Mars
Mission: Mars Reconnaissance Orbiter (MRO)
Spacecraft: Mars Reconnaissance Orbiter (MRO)
Instrument: High Resolution Imaging Science Experiment (HiRISE)
ID#: PIA19108
Added: 2015-01-16

Views: 1111

Beagle 2 Lander Observed by Mars Reconnaissance Orbiter

NASA's Mars Reconnaissance Orbiter shows a bright feature interpreted as the United Kingdom's Beagle 2 Lander, which was never heard from after its expected December 25, 2003, landing.

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A configuration interpreted as the United Kingdom's Beagle 2 Lander, with solar panels at least partially deployed, is indicated in this composite of two images from NASA's Mars Reconnaissance Orbiter.
A configuration interpreted as the United Kingdom's Beagle 2 Lander, with solar panels at least partially deployed, is indicated in this composite of two images from NASA's Mars Reconnaissance Orbiter.

Beagle 2 Lander on Mars, With Panels Deployed

A configuration interpreted as the United Kingdom's Beagle 2 Lander, with solar panels at least partially deployed, is indicated in this composite of two images from NASA's Mars Reconnaissance Orbiter.

Target: Mars
Mission: Mars Reconnaissance Orbiter (MRO)
Spacecraft: Mars Reconnaissance Orbiter (MRO)
Instrument: High Resolution Imaging Science Experiment (HiRISE)
ID#: PIA19107
Added: 2015-01-16

Views: 466

Beagle 2 Lander on Mars, With Panels Deployed

A configuration interpreted as the United Kingdom's Beagle 2 Lander, with solar panels at least partially deployed, is indicated in this composite of two images from NASA's Mars Reconnaissance Orbiter.

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This annotated image, taken in 2014, shows where features seen in an observation by NASA's Mars Reconnaissance Orbiter have been interpreted as hardware from the Dec. 25, 2003, arrival at Mars of the United Kingdom's Beagle 2 Lander.
This annotated image, taken in 2014, shows where features seen in an observation by NASA's Mars Reconnaissance Orbiter have been interpreted as hardware from the Dec. 25, 2003, arrival at Mars of the United Kingdom's Beagle 2 Lander.

Components of Beagle 2 Flight System on Mars

This annotated image, taken in 2014, shows where features seen in an observation by NASA's Mars Reconnaissance Orbiter have been interpreted as hardware from the Dec. 25, 2003, arrival at Mars of the United Kingdom's Beagle 2 Lander.

Target: Mars
Mission: Mars Reconnaissance Orbiter (MRO)
Spacecraft: Mars Reconnaissance Orbiter (MRO)
Instrument: High Resolution Imaging Science Experiment (HiRISE)
ID#: PIA19106
Added: 2015-01-16

Views: 1348

Components of Beagle 2 Flight System on Mars

This annotated image, taken in 2014, shows where features seen in an observation by NASA's Mars Reconnaissance Orbiter have been interpreted as hardware from the Dec. 25, 2003, arrival at Mars of the United Kingdom's Beagle 2 Lander.

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There are many knob formations is the southeastern Acidalia region of Mars. All show a hilltop crest except one which has a summit crater that resembles a cone volcano in this image captured by NASA's Mars Reconnaissance Orbiter.
There are many knob formations is the southeastern Acidalia region of Mars. All show a hilltop crest except one which has a summit crater that resembles a cone volcano in this image captured by NASA's Mars Reconnaissance Orbiter.

Cratered Summit of a Knob

There are many knob formations is the southeastern Acidalia region of Mars. All show a hilltop crest except one which has a summit crater that resembles a cone volcano in this image captured by NASA's Mars Reconnaissance Orbiter.

Target: Mars
Mission: Mars Reconnaissance Orbiter (MRO)
Spacecraft: Mars Reconnaissance Orbiter (MRO)
Instrument: High Resolution Imaging Science Experiment (HiRISE)
ID#: PIA19131
Added: 2015-01-14

Views: 455

Cratered Summit of a Knob

There are many knob formations is the southeastern Acidalia region of Mars. All show a hilltop crest except one which has a summit crater that resembles a cone volcano in this image captured by NASA's Mars Reconnaissance Orbiter.

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This channelized area is near the source region of the huge outflow channel, Ares Vallis. It was at the distal end or 'long-ways down-river-area' where the Pathfinder/Sojourner mission landed on 4 July 1997.
This channelized area is near the source region of the huge outflow channel, Ares Vallis. It was at the distal end or 'long-ways down-river-area' where the Pathfinder/Sojourner mission landed on 4 July 1997.

A Plateau in Ares Vallis

This channelized area is near the source region of the huge outflow channel, Ares Vallis. It was at the distal end or 'long-ways down-river-area' where the Pathfinder/Sojourner mission landed on 4 July 1997.

Target: Mars
Mission: Mars Reconnaissance Orbiter (MRO)
Spacecraft: Mars Reconnaissance Orbiter (MRO)
Instrument: High Resolution Imaging Science Experiment (HiRISE)
ID#: PIA19130
Added: 2015-01-14

Views: 390

A Plateau in Ares Vallis

This channelized area is near the source region of the huge outflow channel, Ares Vallis. It was at the distal end or 'long-ways down-river-area' where the Pathfinder/Sojourner mission landed on 4 July 1997.

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In this observation, does the morphology of these possible sedimentary fans match those found in Mojave Crater (not picture here)?
In this observation, does the morphology of these possible sedimentary fans match those found in Mojave Crater (not picture here)?

Sedimentary Fans North of Mojave Crater

In this observation, does the morphology of these possible sedimentary fans match those found in Mojave Crater (not picture here)?

Target: Mars
Mission: Mars Reconnaissance Orbiter (MRO)
Spacecraft: Mars Reconnaissance Orbiter (MRO)
Instrument: High Resolution Imaging Science Experiment (HiRISE)
ID#: PIA19129
Added: 2015-01-14

Views: 390

Sedimentary Fans North of Mojave Crater

In this observation, does the morphology of these possible sedimentary fans match those found in Mojave Crater (not picture here)?

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Visible in this observation from NASA's Mars Reconnaissance Orbiter is a section of Cerberus Fossae, which are comprised of a series of rifts present located in Elysium Planitia just north the Martian equator.
Visible in this observation from NASA's Mars Reconnaissance Orbiter is a section of Cerberus Fossae, which are comprised of a series of rifts present located in Elysium Planitia just north the Martian equator.

The Eastern Portion of Cerberus Fossae

Visible in this observation from NASA's Mars Reconnaissance Orbiter is a section of Cerberus Fossae, which are comprised of a series of rifts present located in Elysium Planitia just north the Martian equator.

Target: Mars
Mission: Mars Reconnaissance Orbiter (MRO)
Spacecraft: Mars Reconnaissance Orbiter (MRO)
Instrument: High Resolution Imaging Science Experiment (HiRISE)
ID#: PIA19128
Added: 2015-01-07

Views: 1185

The Eastern Portion of Cerberus Fossae

Visible in this observation from NASA's Mars Reconnaissance Orbiter is a section of Cerberus Fossae, which are comprised of a series of rifts present located in Elysium Planitia just north the Martian equator.

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This image from NASA's Mars Reconnaissance Orbiter shows a new impact crater in Elysium Planitia.
This image from NASA's Mars Reconnaissance Orbiter shows a new impact crater in Elysium Planitia.

A Recent Impact in Elysium Planitia

This image from NASA's Mars Reconnaissance Orbiter shows a new impact crater in Elysium Planitia.

Target: Mars
Mission: Mars Reconnaissance Orbiter (MRO)
Spacecraft: Mars Reconnaissance Orbiter (MRO)
Instrument: High Resolution Imaging Science Experiment (HiRISE)
ID#: PIA19127
Added: 2015-01-07

Views: 6650

A Recent Impact in Elysium Planitia

This image from NASA's Mars Reconnaissance Orbiter shows a new impact crater in Elysium Planitia.

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The image from NASA's Mars Reconnaissance Orbiter is approximately 6 by 6 kilometers and is located east of Noctis Labyrinthus, in a portion the large canyon system Valles Marineris.
The image from NASA's Mars Reconnaissance Orbiter is approximately 6 by 6 kilometers and is located east of Noctis Labyrinthus, in a portion the large canyon system Valles Marineris.

Strange Flow: Landslide, Impact Melt or Lava?

The image from NASA's Mars Reconnaissance Orbiter is approximately 6 by 6 kilometers and is located east of Noctis Labyrinthus, in a portion the large canyon system Valles Marineris.

Target: Mars
Mission: Mars Reconnaissance Orbiter (MRO)
Spacecraft: Mars Reconnaissance Orbiter (MRO)
Instrument: High Resolution Imaging Science Experiment (HiRISE)
ID#: PIA19126
Added: 2015-01-07

Views: 818

Strange Flow: Landslide, Impact Melt or Lava?

The image from NASA's Mars Reconnaissance Orbiter is approximately 6 by 6 kilometers and is located east of Noctis Labyrinthus, in a portion the large canyon system Valles Marineris.

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This image from NASA's Mars Reconnaissance Orbiter is of an approximately 5 kilometer (approx. 3.1 mile) diameter crater that is one of the rare examples of a fresh 'lunar-like' crater on Mars.
This image from NASA's Mars Reconnaissance Orbiter is of an approximately 5 kilometer (approx. 3.1 mile) diameter crater that is one of the rare examples of a fresh 'lunar-like' crater on Mars.

A Polar Smile

This image from NASA's Mars Reconnaissance Orbiter is of an approximately 5 kilometer (approx. 3.1 mile) diameter crater that is one of the rare examples of a fresh 'lunar-like' crater on Mars.

Target: Mars
Mission: Mars Reconnaissance Orbiter (MRO)
Spacecraft: Mars Reconnaissance Orbiter (MRO)
Instrument: High Resolution Imaging Science Experiment (HiRISE)
ID#: PIA19125
Added: 2015-01-07

Views: 841

A Polar Smile

This image from NASA's Mars Reconnaissance Orbiter is of an approximately 5 kilometer (approx. 3.1 mile) diameter crater that is one of the rare examples of a fresh 'lunar-like' crater on Mars.

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This image from NASA's Mars Reconnaissance Orbiter is of an approximately 5 kilometer (approx. 3.1 mile) diameter crater that is one of the rare examples of a fresh 'lunar-like' crater on Mars.
This image from NASA's Mars Reconnaissance Orbiter is of an approximately 5 kilometer (approx. 3.1 mile) diameter crater that is one of the rare examples of a fresh 'lunar-like' crater on Mars.

A Fresh, Lunar-Like Crater on Mars

This image from NASA's Mars Reconnaissance Orbiter is of an approximately 5 kilometer (approx. 3.1 mile) diameter crater that is one of the rare examples of a fresh 'lunar-like' crater on Mars.

Target: Mars
Mission: Mars Reconnaissance Orbiter (MRO)
Spacecraft: Mars Reconnaissance Orbiter (MRO)
Instrument: High Resolution Imaging Science Experiment (HiRISE)
ID#: PIA19124
Added: 2014-12-17

Views: 1289

A Fresh, Lunar-Like Crater on Mars

This image from NASA's Mars Reconnaissance Orbiter is of an approximately 5 kilometer (approx. 3.1 mile) diameter crater that is one of the rare examples of a fresh 'lunar-like' crater on Mars.

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Elorza Crater is a complex crater located north of Coprates Chasma. This image from NASA's Mars Reconnaissance Orbiter centers on the southwestern portion of the central uplift, characterized by numerous bedrock exposures and coherent impact melt flows.
Elorza Crater is a complex crater located north of Coprates Chasma. This image from NASA's Mars Reconnaissance Orbiter centers on the southwestern portion of the central uplift, characterized by numerous bedrock exposures and coherent impact melt flows.

Possible Opaline Silica in the Central Uplift of Elorza Crater

Elorza Crater is a complex crater located north of Coprates Chasma. This image from NASA's Mars Reconnaissance Orbiter centers on the southwestern portion of the central uplift, characterized by numerous bedrock exposures and coherent impact melt flows.

Target: Mars
Mission: Mars Reconnaissance Orbiter (MRO)
Spacecraft: Mars Reconnaissance Orbiter (MRO)
Instrument: High Resolution Imaging Science Experiment (HiRISE)
ID#: PIA19123
Added: 2014-12-17

Views: 856

Possible Opaline Silica in the Central Uplift of Elorza Crater

Elorza Crater is a complex crater located north of Coprates Chasma. This image from NASA's Mars Reconnaissance Orbiter centers on the southwestern portion of the central uplift, characterized by numerous bedrock exposures and coherent impact melt flows.

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This image from NASA's Mars Reconnaissance Orbiter shows frosted gullies on a south-facing slope within a crater. At this time of year only south-facing slopes retain the frost, while the north-facing slopes have melted.
This image from NASA's Mars Reconnaissance Orbiter shows frosted gullies on a south-facing slope within a crater. At this time of year only south-facing slopes retain the frost, while the north-facing slopes have melted.

Frosty Slopes in Late Spring

This image from NASA's Mars Reconnaissance Orbiter shows frosted gullies on a south-facing slope within a crater. At this time of year only south-facing slopes retain the frost, while the north-facing slopes have melted.

Target: Mars
Mission: Mars Reconnaissance Orbiter (MRO)
Spacecraft: Mars Reconnaissance Orbiter (MRO)
Instrument: High Resolution Imaging Science Experiment (HiRISE)
ID#: PIA19122
Added: 2014-12-17

Views: 810

Frosty Slopes in Late Spring

This image from NASA's Mars Reconnaissance Orbiter shows frosted gullies on a south-facing slope within a crater. At this time of year only south-facing slopes retain the frost, while the north-facing slopes have melted.

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This image from NASA's Mars Reconnaissance Orbiter, approximately 1.5 x 3 kilometers, shows a sample of eroded Martian terrain in Arabia Terra.
This image from NASA's Mars Reconnaissance Orbiter, approximately 1.5 x 3 kilometers, shows a sample of eroded Martian terrain in Arabia Terra.

Eroding Terrain in Arabia Terra

This image from NASA's Mars Reconnaissance Orbiter, approximately 1.5 x 3 kilometers, shows a sample of eroded Martian terrain in Arabia Terra.

Target: Mars
Mission: Mars Reconnaissance Orbiter (MRO)
Spacecraft: Mars Reconnaissance Orbiter (MRO)
Instrument: High Resolution Imaging Science Experiment (HiRISE)
ID#: PIA19121
Added: 2014-12-17

Views: 637

Eroding Terrain in Arabia Terra

This image from NASA's Mars Reconnaissance Orbiter, approximately 1.5 x 3 kilometers, shows a sample of eroded Martian terrain in Arabia Terra.

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Polar layered deposits slopes are quite extensive and partially surround the South polar residual cap as seen in this image from NASA's Mars Reconnaissance Orbiter.
Polar layered deposits slopes are quite extensive and partially surround the South polar residual cap as seen in this image from NASA's Mars Reconnaissance Orbiter.

Polar Layered Deposit Slopes

Polar layered deposits slopes are quite extensive and partially surround the South polar residual cap as seen in this image from NASA's Mars Reconnaissance Orbiter.

Target: Mars
Mission: Mars Reconnaissance Orbiter (MRO)
Spacecraft: Mars Reconnaissance Orbiter (MRO)
Instrument: High Resolution Imaging Science Experiment (HiRISE)
ID#: PIA19120
Added: 2014-12-17

Views: 627

Polar Layered Deposit Slopes

Polar layered deposits slopes are quite extensive and partially surround the South polar residual cap as seen in this image from NASA's Mars Reconnaissance Orbiter.

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Details of hilly terrain within a large Martian canyon are shown on a geological map based on observations from NASA's Mars Reconnaissance Orbiter and produced by the U.S. Geological Survey.
Details of hilly terrain within a large Martian canyon are shown on a geological map based on observations from NASA's Mars Reconnaissance Orbiter and produced by the U.S. Geological Survey.

Geological Mapping of Hills in Martian Canyon

Details of hilly terrain within a large Martian canyon are shown on a geological map based on observations from NASA's Mars Reconnaissance Orbiter and produced by the U.S. Geological Survey.

Target: Mars
Mission: Mars Reconnaissance Orbiter (MRO)
Spacecraft: Mars Reconnaissance Orbiter (MRO)
Instrument: High Resolution Imaging Science Experiment (HiRISE)
ID#: PIA19084
Added: 2014-12-12

Views: 2145

Geological Mapping of Hills in Martian Canyon

Details of hilly terrain within a large Martian canyon are shown on a geological map based on observations from NASA's Mars Reconnaissance Orbiter and produced by the U.S. Geological Survey.

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This frame from an animation simulates a flyover of a portion of a Martian canyon detailed in a geological map produced by the U.S. Geological Survey and based on observations by the HiRISE camera on NASA's Mars Reconnaissance Orbiter.
This frame from an animation simulates a flyover of a portion of a Martian canyon detailed in a geological map produced by the U.S. Geological Survey and based on observations by the HiRISE camera on NASA's Mars Reconnaissance Orbiter.

Simulated Flyover of Mars Canyon Map (Animation)

This frame from an animation simulates a flyover of a portion of a Martian canyon detailed in a geological map produced by the U.S. Geological Survey and based on observations by the HiRISE camera on NASA's Mars Reconnaissance Orbiter.

Target: Mars
Mission: Mars Reconnaissance Orbiter (MRO)
Spacecraft: Mars Reconnaissance Orbiter (MRO)
Instrument: High Resolution Imaging Science Experiment (HiRISE)
ID#: PIA19085
Added: 2014-12-12

Views: 1522

Simulated Flyover of Mars Canyon Map (Animation)

This frame from an animation simulates a flyover of a portion of a Martian canyon detailed in a geological map produced by the U.S. Geological Survey and based on observations by the HiRISE camera on NASA's Mars Reconnaissance Orbiter.

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