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The layered bedrock in this image was brought from several kilometers of depth during the formation of this 44 kilometer wide crater in the volcanic plains of Lunae Planum as seen by NASA's Mars Reconnaissance Orbiter.
The layered bedrock in this image was brought from several kilometers of depth during the formation of this 44 kilometer wide crater in the volcanic plains of Lunae Planum as seen by NASA's Mars Reconnaissance Orbiter.

The Beauty of Layered Stratigraphy

The layered bedrock in this image was brought from several kilometers of depth during the formation of this 44 kilometer wide crater in the volcanic plains of Lunae Planum as seen by NASA's Mars Reconnaissance Orbiter.

Target: Mars
Mission: Mars Reconnaissance Orbiter (MRO)
Spacecraft: Mars Reconnaissance Orbiter (MRO)
Instrument: High Resolution Imaging Science Experiment (HiRISE)
ID#: PIA12178
Added: 2017-01-20

Views: 47

The Beauty of Layered Stratigraphy

The layered bedrock in this image was brought from several kilometers of depth during the formation of this 44 kilometer wide crater in the volcanic plains of Lunae Planum as seen by NASA's Mars Reconnaissance Orbiter.

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The large dark feature is a classic Martian sand dune on Wirtz Crater as seen by NASA's Mars Reconnaissance Orbiter.
The large dark feature is a classic Martian sand dune on Wirtz Crater as seen by NASA's Mars Reconnaissance Orbiter.

The Changing Dunes of Wirtz Crater

The large dark feature is a classic Martian sand dune on Wirtz Crater as seen by NASA's Mars Reconnaissance Orbiter.

Target: Mars
Mission: Mars Reconnaissance Orbiter (MRO)
Spacecraft: Mars Reconnaissance Orbiter (MRO)
Instrument: High Resolution Imaging Science Experiment (HiRISE)
ID#: PIA12289
Added: 2017-01-19

Views: 137

The Changing Dunes of Wirtz Crater

The large dark feature is a classic Martian sand dune on Wirtz Crater as seen by NASA's Mars Reconnaissance Orbiter.

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This color composite from NASA's Mars Reconnaissance Orbiter shows an example of bedrock that may originate from as deep as 2 miles beneath the surface.
This color composite from NASA's Mars Reconnaissance Orbiter shows an example of bedrock that may originate from as deep as 2 miles beneath the surface.

Bedrock Exhumed from the Deep

This color composite from NASA's Mars Reconnaissance Orbiter shows an example of bedrock that may originate from as deep as 2 miles beneath the surface.

Target: Mars
Mission: Mars Reconnaissance Orbiter (MRO)
Spacecraft: Mars Reconnaissance Orbiter (MRO)
Instrument: High Resolution Imaging Science Experiment (HiRISE)
ID#: PIA12291
Added: 2017-01-18

Views: 130

Bedrock Exhumed from the Deep

This color composite from NASA's Mars Reconnaissance Orbiter shows an example of bedrock that may originate from as deep as 2 miles beneath the surface.

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Impact craters form when an asteroid, meteoroid, or comet crashes into a planet's surface, causing an explosion. This impact crater is a little less than 3 kilometers in diameter as seen by NASA's Mars Reconnaissance Orbiter.
Impact craters form when an asteroid, meteoroid, or comet crashes into a planet's surface, causing an explosion. This impact crater is a little less than 3 kilometers in diameter as seen by NASA's Mars Reconnaissance Orbiter.

Crater with Exposed Layers

Impact craters form when an asteroid, meteoroid, or comet crashes into a planet's surface, causing an explosion. This impact crater is a little less than 3 kilometers in diameter as seen by NASA's Mars Reconnaissance Orbiter.

Target: Mars
Mission: Mars Reconnaissance Orbiter (MRO)
Spacecraft: Mars Reconnaissance Orbiter (MRO)
Instrument: High Resolution Imaging Science Experiment (HiRISE)
ID#: PIA12328
Added: 2017-01-17

Views: 66

Crater with Exposed Layers

Impact craters form when an asteroid, meteoroid, or comet crashes into a planet's surface, causing an explosion. This impact crater is a little less than 3 kilometers in diameter as seen by NASA's Mars Reconnaissance Orbiter.

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This image captured by NASA's Mars Reconnaissance Orbiter shows ancient highland channels in Eridania Valley.
This image captured by NASA's Mars Reconnaissance Orbiter shows ancient highland channels in Eridania Valley.

Smooth and Fractured Deposits in Eridania Valleys

This image captured by NASA's Mars Reconnaissance Orbiter shows ancient highland channels in Eridania Valley.

Target: Mars
Mission: Mars Reconnaissance Orbiter (MRO)
Spacecraft: Mars Reconnaissance Orbiter (MRO)
Instrument: High Resolution Imaging Science Experiment (HiRISE)
ID#: PIA12968
Added: 2017-01-13

Views: 145

Smooth and Fractured Deposits in Eridania Valleys

This image captured by NASA's Mars Reconnaissance Orbiter shows ancient highland channels in Eridania Valley.

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This image of a well-preserved unnamed elliptical crater in Terra Sabaea, captured by NASA's Mars Reconnaissance Orbiter, shows the complexity of ejecta deposits forming as a by-product of the impact process that shapes much of the surface of Mars.
This image of a well-preserved unnamed elliptical crater in Terra Sabaea, captured by NASA's Mars Reconnaissance Orbiter, shows the complexity of ejecta deposits forming as a by-product of the impact process that shapes much of the surface of Mars.

Well-Preserved Impact Ejecta and Impact Melt-Rich Deposits in Terra Sabaea

This image of a well-preserved unnamed elliptical crater in Terra Sabaea, captured by NASA's Mars Reconnaissance Orbiter, shows the complexity of ejecta deposits forming as a by-product of the impact process that shapes much of the surface of Mars.

Target: Mars
Mission: Mars Reconnaissance Orbiter (MRO)
Spacecraft: Mars Reconnaissance Orbiter (MRO)
Instrument: High Resolution Imaging Science Experiment (HiRISE)
ID#: PIA13078
Added: 2017-01-12

Views: 257

Well-Preserved Impact Ejecta and Impact Melt-Rich Deposits in Terra Sabaea

This image of a well-preserved unnamed elliptical crater in Terra Sabaea, captured by NASA's Mars Reconnaissance Orbiter, shows the complexity of ejecta deposits forming as a by-product of the impact process that shapes much of the surface of Mars.

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Southern spring on Mars brings sublimation of the seasonal dry ice polar cap as seen by NASA's Mars Reconnaissance Orbiter.
Southern spring on Mars brings sublimation of the seasonal dry ice polar cap as seen by NASA's Mars Reconnaissance Orbiter.

Wide, Branching Channels

Southern spring on Mars brings sublimation of the seasonal dry ice polar cap as seen by NASA's Mars Reconnaissance Orbiter.

Target: Mars
Mission: Mars Reconnaissance Orbiter (MRO)
Spacecraft: Mars Reconnaissance Orbiter (MRO)
Instrument: High Resolution Imaging Science Experiment (HiRISE)
ID#: PIA13151
Added: 2017-01-11

Views: 231

Wide, Branching Channels

Southern spring on Mars brings sublimation of the seasonal dry ice polar cap as seen by NASA's Mars Reconnaissance Orbiter.

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NASA's Mars Reconnaissance Orbiter spied this small 2 kilometer-wide crater when a meteoroid struck the ground just to the west and created a new, larger crater (not shown).
NASA's Mars Reconnaissance Orbiter spied this small 2 kilometer-wide crater when a meteoroid struck the ground just to the west and created a new, larger crater (not shown).

Muddy Ejecta Flow

NASA's Mars Reconnaissance Orbiter spied this small 2 kilometer-wide crater when a meteoroid struck the ground just to the west and created a new, larger crater (not shown).

Target: Mars
Mission: Mars Reconnaissance Orbiter (MRO)
Spacecraft: Mars Reconnaissance Orbiter (MRO)
Instrument: High Resolution Imaging Science Experiment (HiRISE)
ID#: PIA13181
Added: 2017-01-10

Views: 131

Muddy Ejecta Flow

NASA's Mars Reconnaissance Orbiter spied this small 2 kilometer-wide crater when a meteoroid struck the ground just to the west and created a new, larger crater (not shown).

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The western Utopia Planitia in the Northern mid-latitudes of Mars is marked by a peculiar type of depression with scalloped edges and by a network of polygonal fractures as seen by NASA's Mars Reconnaissance Orbiter.
The western Utopia Planitia in the Northern mid-latitudes of Mars is marked by a peculiar type of depression with scalloped edges and by a network of polygonal fractures as seen by NASA's Mars Reconnaissance Orbiter.

Eroded Scallops with Layers

The western Utopia Planitia in the Northern mid-latitudes of Mars is marked by a peculiar type of depression with scalloped edges and by a network of polygonal fractures as seen by NASA's Mars Reconnaissance Orbiter.

Target: Mars
Mission: Mars Reconnaissance Orbiter (MRO)
Spacecraft: Mars Reconnaissance Orbiter (MRO)
Instrument: High Resolution Imaging Science Experiment (HiRISE)
ID#: PIA13485
Added: 2017-01-09

Views: 321

Eroded Scallops with Layers

The western Utopia Planitia in the Northern mid-latitudes of Mars is marked by a peculiar type of depression with scalloped edges and by a network of polygonal fractures as seen by NASA's Mars Reconnaissance Orbiter.

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This composite image of Earth and its moon, as seen from Mars, combines the best Earth image with the best moon image from four sets of images acquired on Nov. 20, 2016, by NASA's Mars Reconnaissance Orbiter. Mars was about 127 million miles from Earth.
This composite image of Earth and its moon, as seen from Mars, combines the best Earth image with the best moon image from four sets of images acquired on Nov. 20, 2016, by NASA's Mars Reconnaissance Orbiter. Mars was about 127 million miles from Earth.

Earth and Its Moon, as Seen From Mars

This composite image of Earth and its moon, as seen from Mars, combines the best Earth image with the best moon image from four sets of images acquired on Nov. 20, 2016, by NASA's Mars Reconnaissance Orbiter. Mars was about 127 million miles from Earth.

Target: Earth
Mission: Mars Reconnaissance Orbiter (MRO)
Spacecraft: Mars Reconnaissance Orbiter (MRO)
Instrument: High Resolution Imaging Science Experiment (HiRISE)
ID#: PIA21260
Added: 2017-01-06

Views: 117316

Earth and Its Moon, as Seen From Mars

This composite image of Earth and its moon, as seen from Mars, combines the best Earth image with the best moon image from four sets of images acquired on Nov. 20, 2016, by NASA's Mars Reconnaissance Orbiter. Mars was about 127 million miles from Earth.

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Large impact craters have central hills or mountains, because the tremendous shock waves from the impact first compresses the ground, then causes a rebound when it becomes uncompressed. This image is from NASA's Mars Reconnaissance Orbiter.
Large impact craters have central hills or mountains, because the tremendous shock waves from the impact first compresses the ground, then causes a rebound when it becomes uncompressed. This image is from NASA's Mars Reconnaissance Orbiter.

Raised Bedrock in Terra Cimmeria

Large impact craters have central hills or mountains, because the tremendous shock waves from the impact first compresses the ground, then causes a rebound when it becomes uncompressed. This image is from NASA's Mars Reconnaissance Orbiter.

Target: Mars
Mission: Mars Reconnaissance Orbiter (MRO)
Spacecraft: Mars Reconnaissance Orbiter (MRO)
Instrument: High Resolution Imaging Science Experiment (HiRISE)
ID#: PIA15149
Added: 2017-01-05

Views: 336

Raised Bedrock in Terra Cimmeria

Large impact craters have central hills or mountains, because the tremendous shock waves from the impact first compresses the ground, then causes a rebound when it becomes uncompressed. This image is from NASA's Mars Reconnaissance Orbiter.

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Over 300 meters of layered beds are exposed in this trough of Noctis Labyrinthus, at the western edge of Valles Marineris, as observed by NASA's Mars Reconnaissance Orbiter.
Over 300 meters of layered beds are exposed in this trough of Noctis Labyrinthus, at the western edge of Valles Marineris, as observed by NASA's Mars Reconnaissance Orbiter.

Light-Toned Layering in a Labyrinthus Noctis Pit

Over 300 meters of layered beds are exposed in this trough of Noctis Labyrinthus, at the western edge of Valles Marineris, as observed by NASA's Mars Reconnaissance Orbiter.

Target: Mars
Mission: Mars Reconnaissance Orbiter (MRO)
Spacecraft: Mars Reconnaissance Orbiter (MRO)
Instrument: High Resolution Imaging Science Experiment (HiRISE)
ID#: PIA14455
Added: 2017-01-03

Views: 243

Light-Toned Layering in a Labyrinthus Noctis Pit

Over 300 meters of layered beds are exposed in this trough of Noctis Labyrinthus, at the western edge of Valles Marineris, as observed by NASA's Mars Reconnaissance Orbiter.

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Impact craters expose the subsurface materials on steep slopes in this image observed by NASA's Mars Reconnaissance Orbiter.
Impact craters expose the subsurface materials on steep slopes in this image observed by NASA's Mars Reconnaissance Orbiter.

Hues in a Crater Slope

Impact craters expose the subsurface materials on steep slopes in this image observed by NASA's Mars Reconnaissance Orbiter.

Target: Mars
Mission: Mars Reconnaissance Orbiter (MRO)
Spacecraft: Mars Reconnaissance Orbiter (MRO)
Instrument: High Resolution Imaging Science Experiment (HiRISE)
ID#: PIA14454
Added: 2017-01-02

Views: 178

Hues in a Crater Slope

Impact craters expose the subsurface materials on steep slopes in this image observed by NASA's Mars Reconnaissance Orbiter.

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This crater on Mars, observed by NASA's Mars Reconnaissance Orbiter, was named after Dr. Gerald A. Soffen (February 7, 1926 - November 22, 2000), and this image covers a small portion of the crater floor.
This crater on Mars, observed by NASA's Mars Reconnaissance Orbiter, was named after Dr. Gerald A. Soffen (February 7, 1926 - November 22, 2000), and this image covers a small portion of the crater floor.

Soffen Crater Floor

This crater on Mars, observed by NASA's Mars Reconnaissance Orbiter, was named after Dr. Gerald A. Soffen (February 7, 1926 - November 22, 2000), and this image covers a small portion of the crater floor.

Target: Mars
Mission: Mars Reconnaissance Orbiter (MRO)
Spacecraft: Mars Reconnaissance Orbiter (MRO)
Instrument: High Resolution Imaging Science Experiment (HiRISE)
ID#: PIA14453
Added: 2016-12-21

Views: 97

Soffen Crater Floor

This crater on Mars, observed by NASA's Mars Reconnaissance Orbiter, was named after Dr. Gerald A. Soffen (February 7, 1926 - November 22, 2000), and this image covers a small portion of the crater floor.

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This terrain, as seen by NASA's Mars Reconnaissance Orbiter, looks like lumpy sediment on top of patterned ground. The lumpy sediment is likely just loosely consolidated because it is covered with spidery channels.
This terrain, as seen by NASA's Mars Reconnaissance Orbiter, looks like lumpy sediment on top of patterned ground. The lumpy sediment is likely just loosely consolidated because it is covered with spidery channels.

Spiders on Mounds

This terrain, as seen by NASA's Mars Reconnaissance Orbiter, looks like lumpy sediment on top of patterned ground. The lumpy sediment is likely just loosely consolidated because it is covered with spidery channels.

Target: Mars
Mission: Mars Reconnaissance Orbiter (MRO)
Spacecraft: Mars Reconnaissance Orbiter (MRO)
Instrument: High Resolution Imaging Science Experiment (HiRISE)
ID#: PIA14452
Added: 2016-12-21

Views: 120

Spiders on Mounds

This terrain, as seen by NASA's Mars Reconnaissance Orbiter, looks like lumpy sediment on top of patterned ground. The lumpy sediment is likely just loosely consolidated because it is covered with spidery channels.

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Some seasonal ice on Mars is transparent so that the sunlight penetrates to the bottom of the ice, as shown in this image from NASA's Mars Reconnaissance Orbiter.
Some seasonal ice on Mars is transparent so that the sunlight penetrates to the bottom of the ice, as shown in this image from NASA's Mars Reconnaissance Orbiter.

Lace on Mars

Some seasonal ice on Mars is transparent so that the sunlight penetrates to the bottom of the ice, as shown in this image from NASA's Mars Reconnaissance Orbiter.

Target: Mars
Mission: Mars Reconnaissance Orbiter (MRO)
Spacecraft: Mars Reconnaissance Orbiter (MRO)
Instrument: High Resolution Imaging Science Experiment (HiRISE)
ID#: PIA14451
Added: 2016-12-21

Views: 157

Lace on Mars

Some seasonal ice on Mars is transparent so that the sunlight penetrates to the bottom of the ice, as shown in this image from NASA's Mars Reconnaissance Orbiter.

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This image of a southern mid-latitude crater was intended to investigate the lineated material on the crater floor. NASA's Mars Reconnaissance Orbiter reveals a landscape peppered by small impact craters.
This image of a southern mid-latitude crater was intended to investigate the lineated material on the crater floor. NASA's Mars Reconnaissance Orbiter reveals a landscape peppered by small impact craters.

Secondary Craters

This image of a southern mid-latitude crater was intended to investigate the lineated material on the crater floor. NASA's Mars Reconnaissance Orbiter reveals a landscape peppered by small impact craters.

Target: Mars
Mission: Mars Reconnaissance Orbiter (MRO)
Spacecraft: Mars Reconnaissance Orbiter (MRO)
Instrument: High Resolution Imaging Science Experiment (HiRISE)
ID#: PIA14450
Added: 2016-12-21

Views: 89

Secondary Craters

This image of a southern mid-latitude crater was intended to investigate the lineated material on the crater floor. NASA's Mars Reconnaissance Orbiter reveals a landscape peppered by small impact craters.

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These five images from the HiRISE camera on NASA's Mars Reconnaissance Orbiter show different Martian features of progressively greater size and complexity.
These five images from the HiRISE camera on NASA's Mars Reconnaissance Orbiter show different Martian features of progressively greater size and complexity.

Possible Development Stages of Martian 'Spiders'

These five images from the HiRISE camera on NASA's Mars Reconnaissance Orbiter show different Martian features of progressively greater size and complexity.

Target: Mars
Mission: Mars Reconnaissance Orbiter (MRO)
Spacecraft: Mars Reconnaissance Orbiter (MRO)
Instrument: High Resolution Imaging Science Experiment (HiRISE)
ID#: PIA21258
Added: 2016-12-20

Views: 281

Possible Development Stages of Martian 'Spiders'

These five images from the HiRISE camera on NASA's Mars Reconnaissance Orbiter show different Martian features of progressively greater size and complexity.

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This image from NASA's Mars Reconnaissance Orbiter shows the growth of a branching network of troughs carved by thawing carbon dioxide over the span of three Martian years.
This image from NASA's Mars Reconnaissance Orbiter shows the growth of a branching network of troughs carved by thawing carbon dioxide over the span of three Martian years.

'Baby Spider': Growth of a Martian Trough Network

This image from NASA's Mars Reconnaissance Orbiter shows the growth of a branching network of troughs carved by thawing carbon dioxide over the span of three Martian years.

Target: Mars
Mission: Mars Reconnaissance Orbiter (MRO)
Spacecraft: Mars Reconnaissance Orbiter (MRO)
Instrument: High Resolution Imaging Science Experiment (HiRISE)
ID#: PIA21257
Added: 2016-12-20

Views: 216

'Baby Spider': Growth of a Martian Trough Network

This image from NASA's Mars Reconnaissance Orbiter shows the growth of a branching network of troughs carved by thawing carbon dioxide over the span of three Martian years.

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NASA's Mars Reconnaissance Orbiter spies Capri Chasma, located in the eastern portion of the Valles Marineris canyon system, the largest known canyon system in the Solar System.
NASA's Mars Reconnaissance Orbiter spies Capri Chasma, located in the eastern portion of the Valles Marineris canyon system, the largest known canyon system in the Solar System.

Hematite-Rich Deposits in Capri Chasma

NASA's Mars Reconnaissance Orbiter spies Capri Chasma, located in the eastern portion of the Valles Marineris canyon system, the largest known canyon system in the Solar System.

Target: Mars
Mission: Mars Reconnaissance Orbiter (MRO)
Spacecraft: Mars Reconnaissance Orbiter (MRO)
Instrument: High Resolution Imaging Science Experiment (HiRISE)
ID#: PIA21274
Added: 2016-12-14

Views: 211

Hematite-Rich Deposits in Capri Chasma

NASA's Mars Reconnaissance Orbiter spies Capri Chasma, located in the eastern portion of the Valles Marineris canyon system, the largest known canyon system in the Solar System.

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This image captured by NASA's Mars Reconnaissance Orbiter, shows the floor of Suzhi Crater, an approximately 25-kilometer diameter impact crater located northeast of Hellas Planitia.
This image captured by NASA's Mars Reconnaissance Orbiter, shows the floor of Suzhi Crater, an approximately 25-kilometer diameter impact crater located northeast of Hellas Planitia.

Possible Layers on Floor of Suzhi Crater

This image captured by NASA's Mars Reconnaissance Orbiter, shows the floor of Suzhi Crater, an approximately 25-kilometer diameter impact crater located northeast of Hellas Planitia.

Target: Mars
Mission: Mars Reconnaissance Orbiter (MRO)
Spacecraft: Mars Reconnaissance Orbiter (MRO)
Instrument: High Resolution Imaging Science Experiment (HiRISE)
ID#: PIA21273
Added: 2016-12-14

Views: 204

Possible Layers on Floor of Suzhi Crater

This image captured by NASA's Mars Reconnaissance Orbiter, shows the floor of Suzhi Crater, an approximately 25-kilometer diameter impact crater located northeast of Hellas Planitia.

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The image from NASA's Mars Reconnaissance Orbiter, shows a region we see many slope streaks, typically dark features on slopes in the equatorial regions on Mars.
The image from NASA's Mars Reconnaissance Orbiter, shows a region we see many slope streaks, typically dark features on slopes in the equatorial regions on Mars.

Slope Streaks or RSL?

The image from NASA's Mars Reconnaissance Orbiter, shows a region we see many slope streaks, typically dark features on slopes in the equatorial regions on Mars.

Target: Mars
Mission: Mars Reconnaissance Orbiter (MRO)
Spacecraft: Mars Reconnaissance Orbiter (MRO)
Instrument: High Resolution Imaging Science Experiment (HiRISE)
ID#: PIA21272
Added: 2016-12-14

Views: 124

Slope Streaks or RSL?

The image from NASA's Mars Reconnaissance Orbiter, shows a region we see many slope streaks, typically dark features on slopes in the equatorial regions on Mars.

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In this image captured by NASA's Mars Reconnaissance Orbiter, the terrain is covered with a seasonal layer of dry ice.
In this image captured by NASA's Mars Reconnaissance Orbiter, the terrain is covered with a seasonal layer of dry ice.

Fans on Crater Rims

In this image captured by NASA's Mars Reconnaissance Orbiter, the terrain is covered with a seasonal layer of dry ice.

Target: Mars
Mission: Mars Reconnaissance Orbiter (MRO)
Spacecraft: Mars Reconnaissance Orbiter (MRO)
Instrument: High Resolution Imaging Science Experiment (HiRISE)
ID#: PIA21271
Added: 2016-12-14

Views: 189

Fans on Crater Rims

In this image captured by NASA's Mars Reconnaissance Orbiter, the terrain is covered with a seasonal layer of dry ice.

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This graphic maps locations of the sites where NASA's Curiosity collected its first 19 rock or soil samples for analysis by laboratory instruments inside the vehicle. It also presents images of the drilled holes where 15 rock-powder samples were acquired.
This graphic maps locations of the sites where NASA's Curiosity collected its first 19 rock or soil samples for analysis by laboratory instruments inside the vehicle. It also presents images of the drilled holes where 15 rock-powder samples were acquired.

Curiosity's Rock or Soil Sampling Sites on Mars, Through November 2016

This graphic maps locations of the sites where NASA's Curiosity collected its first 19 rock or soil samples for analysis by laboratory instruments inside the vehicle. It also presents images of the drilled holes where 15 rock-powder samples were acquired.

Target: Mars
Mission: Mars Reconnaissance Orbiter (MRO), Mars Science Laboratory (MSL)
Spacecraft: Curiosity, Mars Reconnaissance Orbiter (MRO)
Instrument: High Resolution Imaging Science Experiment (HiRISE), Mars Hand Lens Imager (MAHLI)
ID#: PIA21254
Added: 2016-12-13

Views: 263

Curiosity's Rock or Soil Sampling Sites on Mars, Through November 2016

This graphic maps locations of the sites where NASA's Curiosity collected its first 19 rock or soil samples for analysis by laboratory instruments inside the vehicle. It also presents images of the drilled holes where 15 rock-powder samples were acquired.

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Examination of a calcium sulfate vein called 'Diyogha' by the Chemical and ChemCam instrument on NASA's Curiosity Mars rover found boron, sodium and chlorine.
Examination of a calcium sulfate vein called 'Diyogha' by the Chemical and ChemCam instrument on NASA's Curiosity Mars rover found boron, sodium and chlorine.

Boron, Sodium and Chlorine in Mineral Vein 'Diyogha,' Mars

Examination of a calcium sulfate vein called 'Diyogha' by the Chemical and ChemCam instrument on NASA's Curiosity Mars rover found boron, sodium and chlorine.

Target: Mars
Mission: Mars Science Laboratory (MSL)
Spacecraft: Mars Reconnaissance Orbiter (MRO), Mars Science Laboratory (MSL)
Instrument: Chemistry and Camera (ChemCam), Mastcam
ID#: PIA21252
Added: 2016-12-13

Views: 138

Boron, Sodium and Chlorine in Mineral Vein 'Diyogha,' Mars

Examination of a calcium sulfate vein called 'Diyogha' by the Chemical and ChemCam instrument on NASA's Curiosity Mars rover found boron, sodium and chlorine.

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