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NASA's NuSTAR, has helped to show that the spin rates of black holes can be measured conclusively. The solid lines show two theoretical models that explain low-energy X-ray emission seen previously from the spiral galaxy NGC 1365 by XMM-Newton.
NASA's NuSTAR, has helped to show that the spin rates of black holes can be measured conclusively. The solid lines show two theoretical models that explain low-energy X-ray emission seen previously from the spiral galaxy NGC 1365 by XMM-Newton.

Two X-Ray Observatories are Better Than One

NASA's NuSTAR, has helped to show that the spin rates of black holes can be measured conclusively. The solid lines show two theoretical models that explain low-energy X-ray emission seen previously from the spiral galaxy NGC 1365 by XMM-Newton.

Mission: NuSTAR, XMM-Newton
Size: 4266 x 2400
ID#: PIA16870
Added: 2013-02-27

Views: 1627

Two X-Ray Observatories are Better Than One

NASA's NuSTAR, has helped to show that the spin rates of black holes can be measured conclusively. The solid lines show two theoretical models that explain low-energy X-ray emission seen previously from the spiral galaxy NGC 1365 by XMM-Newton.

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This image taken by the ultraviolet-light monitoring camera on the European Space Agency's (ESA's) XMM-Newton telescope shows the beautiful spiral arms of the galaxy NGC1365.
This image taken by the ultraviolet-light monitoring camera on the European Space Agency's (ESA's) XMM-Newton telescope shows the beautiful spiral arms of the galaxy NGC1365.

NuSTAR's Improved View

This image taken by the ultraviolet-light monitoring camera on the European Space Agency's (ESA's) XMM-Newton telescope shows the beautiful spiral arms of the galaxy NGC1365.

Mission: NuSTAR, XMM-Newton
Size: 3000 x 2400
ID#: PIA16699
Added: 2013-02-27

Views: 1679

NuSTAR's Improved View

This image taken by the ultraviolet-light monitoring camera on the European Space Agency's (ESA's) XMM-Newton telescope shows the beautiful spiral arms of the galaxy NGC1365.

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This chart depicts the electromagnetic spectrum, highlighting the X-ray portion. NASA's NuSTAR and ESA's XMM-Newton telescope complement each other by seeing different colors of X-ray light.
This chart depicts the electromagnetic spectrum, highlighting the X-ray portion. NASA's NuSTAR and ESA's XMM-Newton telescope complement each other by seeing different colors of X-ray light.

Complementary X-Ray Vision

This chart depicts the electromagnetic spectrum, highlighting the X-ray portion. NASA's NuSTAR and ESA's XMM-Newton telescope complement each other by seeing different colors of X-ray light.

Mission: NuSTAR, XMM-Newton
Size: 3000 x 1731
ID#: PIA16698
Added: 2013-02-27

Views: 1620

Complementary X-Ray Vision

This chart depicts the electromagnetic spectrum, highlighting the X-ray portion. NASA's NuSTAR and ESA's XMM-Newton telescope complement each other by seeing different colors of X-ray light.

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Scientists measure the spin rates of supermassive black holes by spreading the X-ray light into different colors. The light comes from accretion disks that swirl around black holes, as shown in both of the artist's concepts.
Scientists measure the spin rates of supermassive black holes by spreading the X-ray light into different colors. The light comes from accretion disks that swirl around black holes, as shown in both of the artist's concepts.

Two Models of Black Hole Spin (Artist's Concept)

Scientists measure the spin rates of supermassive black holes by spreading the X-ray light into different colors. The light comes from accretion disks that swirl around black holes, as shown in both of the artist's concepts.

Mission: NuSTAR, XMM-Newton
Size: 3600 x 2400
ID#: PIA16697
Added: 2013-02-27

Views: 2003

Two Models of Black Hole Spin (Artist's Concept)

Scientists measure the spin rates of supermassive black holes by spreading the X-ray light into different colors. The light comes from accretion disks that swirl around black holes, as shown in both of the artist's concepts.

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Black holes are tremendous objects whose immense gravity can distort and twist space-time, the fabric that shapes our universe as this chart from NASA's NuSTAR and ESA's XMM-Newton telescope illustrates.
Black holes are tremendous objects whose immense gravity can distort and twist space-time, the fabric that shapes our universe as this chart from NASA's NuSTAR and ESA's XMM-Newton telescope illustrates.

How to Measure the Spin of a Black Hole (Artist's Concept)

Black holes are tremendous objects whose immense gravity can distort and twist space-time, the fabric that shapes our universe as this chart from NASA's NuSTAR and ESA's XMM-Newton telescope illustrates.

Mission: NuSTAR, XMM-Newton
Size: 3600 x 2400
ID#: PIA16696
Added: 2013-02-27

Views: 2370

How to Measure the Spin of a Black Hole (Artist's Concept)

Black holes are tremendous objects whose immense gravity can distort and twist space-time, the fabric that shapes our universe as this chart from NASA's NuSTAR and ESA's XMM-Newton telescope illustrates.

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W44 is located around 10,000 light-years away, within a forest of dense star-forming clouds in the constellation of Aquila, the Eagle. This image combines data from ESA's Herschel and XXM-Newton space observatories.
W44 is located around 10,000 light-years away, within a forest of dense star-forming clouds in the constellation of Aquila, the Eagle. This image combines data from ESA's Herschel and XXM-Newton space observatories.

Life and Death in a Star-Forming Cloud

W44 is located around 10,000 light-years away, within a forest of dense star-forming clouds in the constellation of Aquila, the Eagle. This image combines data from ESA's Herschel and XXM-Newton space observatories.

Mission: Herschel Space Observatory, XMM-Newton
Instrument: Photoconductor Array Camera and Spectrometer, Spectral and Photometric Imaging Receiver, XMM-Newton X-ray
Size: 3234 x 2248
ID#: PIA16464
Added: 2012-11-14

Views: 4799

Life and Death in a Star-Forming Cloud

W44 is located around 10,000 light-years away, within a forest of dense star-forming clouds in the constellation of Aquila, the Eagle. This image combines data from ESA's Herschel and XXM-Newton space observatories.

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Currently displaying images 1-6 of 6
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