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Supermassive black holes at the cores of galaxies blast radiation and ultra-fast winds outward, as illustrated in this artist's conception based on NASA's NuSTAR and ESA's XMM-Newton telescopes.
Supermassive black holes at the cores of galaxies blast radiation and ultra-fast winds outward, as illustrated in this artist's conception based on NASA's NuSTAR and ESA's XMM-Newton telescopes.

How Black Hole Winds Blow (Artist's Concept)

Supermassive black holes at the cores of galaxies blast radiation and ultra-fast winds outward, as illustrated in this artist's conception based on NASA's NuSTAR and ESA's XMM-Newton telescopes.

Mission: NuSTAR, XMM-Newton
ID#: PIA18919
Added: 2015-02-19

Views: 1524

How Black Hole Winds Blow (Artist's Concept)

Supermassive black holes at the cores of galaxies blast radiation and ultra-fast winds outward, as illustrated in this artist's conception based on NASA's NuSTAR and ESA's XMM-Newton telescopes.

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This plot of data from two space telescopes, NASA's NuSTAR and ESA's XMM-Newton determines for the first time the shape of ultra-fast winds from supermassive black holes, or quasars.
This plot of data from two space telescopes, NASA's NuSTAR and ESA's XMM-Newton determines for the first time the shape of ultra-fast winds from supermassive black holes, or quasars.

The Answer is Blowing in the Black Hole Wind

This plot of data from two space telescopes, NASA's NuSTAR and ESA's XMM-Newton determines for the first time the shape of ultra-fast winds from supermassive black holes, or quasars.

Mission: NuSTAR, XMM-Newton
ID#: PIA18918
Added: 2015-02-19

Views: 515

The Answer is Blowing in the Black Hole Wind

This plot of data from two space telescopes, NASA's NuSTAR and ESA's XMM-Newton determines for the first time the shape of ultra-fast winds from supermassive black holes, or quasars.

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The real monster black hole is revealed in this image from NASA's Nuclear Spectroscopic Telescope Array of colliding galaxies Arp 299.
The real monster black hole is revealed in this image from NASA's Nuclear Spectroscopic Telescope Array of colliding galaxies Arp 299.

Tale of Two Black Holes

The real monster black hole is revealed in this image from NASA's Nuclear Spectroscopic Telescope Array of colliding galaxies Arp 299.

Mission: Hubble Space Telescope, NuSTAR
ID#: PIA18907
Added: 2015-01-08

Views: 6805

Tale of Two Black Holes

The real monster black hole is revealed in this image from NASA's Nuclear Spectroscopic Telescope Array of colliding galaxies Arp 299.

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X-rays stream off the sun in this first picture of the sun, overlaid on a picture taken by NASA's Solar Dynamics Observatory, taken by NuSTAR.
X-rays stream off the sun in this first picture of the sun, overlaid on a picture taken by NASA's Solar Dynamics Observatory, taken by NuSTAR.

Sun Shines in High-Energy X-rays

X-rays stream off the sun in this first picture of the sun, overlaid on a picture taken by NASA's Solar Dynamics Observatory, taken by NuSTAR.

Target: Sun
Mission: NuSTAR
Instrument: Nuclear Spectroscopic Telescope Array, Solar Dynamics Observatory (SDO)
ID#: PIA18906
Added: 2014-12-22

Views: 37519

Sun Shines in High-Energy X-rays

X-rays stream off the sun in this first picture of the sun, overlaid on a picture taken by NASA's Solar Dynamics Observatory, taken by NuSTAR.

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This image shows a neutron star -- the core of a star that exploded in a massive supernova. This particular neutron star is known as a pulsar because it sends out rotating beams of X-rays that sweep past Earth like lighthouse beacons.
This image shows a neutron star -- the core of a star that exploded in a massive supernova. This particular neutron star is known as a pulsar because it sends out rotating beams of X-rays that sweep past Earth like lighthouse beacons.

Beacons of X-ray Light (Animation)

This image shows a neutron star -- the core of a star that exploded in a massive supernova. This particular neutron star is known as a pulsar because it sends out rotating beams of X-rays that sweep past Earth like lighthouse beacons.

Mission: NuSTAR
ID#: PIA18845
Added: 2014-10-08

Views: 2733

Beacons of X-ray Light (Animation)

This image shows a neutron star -- the core of a star that exploded in a massive supernova. This particular neutron star is known as a pulsar because it sends out rotating beams of X-rays that sweep past Earth like lighthouse beacons.

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NuSTAR has added a new twist to the mystery of ultraluminous X-ray sources (ULXs) by showing that one of the ULXs in M82, called M82 X-2, is not a black hole but a pulsar.
NuSTAR has added a new twist to the mystery of ultraluminous X-ray sources (ULXs) by showing that one of the ULXs in M82, called M82 X-2, is not a black hole but a pulsar.

Ultraluminous X-ray Sources in M82 Galaxy

NuSTAR has added a new twist to the mystery of ultraluminous X-ray sources (ULXs) by showing that one of the ULXs in M82, called M82 X-2, is not a black hole but a pulsar.

Mission: NuSTAR
ID#: PIA18844
Added: 2014-10-08

Views: 1671

Ultraluminous X-ray Sources in M82 Galaxy

NuSTAR has added a new twist to the mystery of ultraluminous X-ray sources (ULXs) by showing that one of the ULXs in M82, called M82 X-2, is not a black hole but a pulsar.

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The brightest pulsar detected to date is shown in this frame from an animation that flips back and forth between images captured by NASA's NuSTAR. A pulsar is a type of neutron star, the leftover core of a star that exploded in a supernova.
The brightest pulsar detected to date is shown in this frame from an animation that flips back and forth between images captured by NASA's NuSTAR. A pulsar is a type of neutron star, the leftover core of a star that exploded in a supernova.

NuSTAR Captures the Beat of a Dead Star (Animation)

The brightest pulsar detected to date is shown in this frame from an animation that flips back and forth between images captured by NASA's NuSTAR. A pulsar is a type of neutron star, the leftover core of a star that exploded in a supernova.

Mission: NuSTAR
ID#: PIA18843
Added: 2014-10-08

Views: 1457

NuSTAR Captures the Beat of a Dead Star (Animation)

The brightest pulsar detected to date is shown in this frame from an animation that flips back and forth between images captured by NASA's NuSTAR. A pulsar is a type of neutron star, the leftover core of a star that exploded in a supernova.

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This chart illustrates relative masses of super-dense cosmic objects, ranging from white dwarfs to supermassive black holes encased in the cores of most galaxies. The first three 'dead' stars (left) all form when stars more massive than our sun explode.
This chart illustrates relative masses of super-dense cosmic objects, ranging from white dwarfs to supermassive black holes encased in the cores of most galaxies. The first three 'dead' stars (left) all form when stars more massive than our sun explode.

Mass Chart for Dead Stars and Black Holes

This chart illustrates relative masses of super-dense cosmic objects, ranging from white dwarfs to supermassive black holes encased in the cores of most galaxies. The first three 'dead' stars (left) all form when stars more massive than our sun explode.

Mission: NuSTAR
ID#: PIA18842
Added: 2014-10-08

Views: 1458

Mass Chart for Dead Stars and Black Holes

This chart illustrates relative masses of super-dense cosmic objects, ranging from white dwarfs to supermassive black holes encased in the cores of most galaxies. The first three 'dead' stars (left) all form when stars more massive than our sun explode.

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The bulk of a galaxy called Messier 82 (M82), or the 'Cigar galaxy,' is seen in visible-light data captured by the National Optical Astronomy Observatory's 2.1-meter telescope at Kitt Peak in Arizona.
The bulk of a galaxy called Messier 82 (M82), or the 'Cigar galaxy,' is seen in visible-light data captured by the National Optical Astronomy Observatory's 2.1-meter telescope at Kitt Peak in Arizona.

NuSTAR Finds a Pulse in Cigar Galaxy

The bulk of a galaxy called Messier 82 (M82), or the 'Cigar galaxy,' is seen in visible-light data captured by the National Optical Astronomy Observatory's 2.1-meter telescope at Kitt Peak in Arizona.

Mission: NuSTAR
ID#: PIA18841
Added: 2014-10-08

Views: 2515

NuSTAR Finds a Pulse in Cigar Galaxy

The bulk of a galaxy called Messier 82 (M82), or the 'Cigar galaxy,' is seen in visible-light data captured by the National Optical Astronomy Observatory's 2.1-meter telescope at Kitt Peak in Arizona.

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The comparison from NASA's Hubble telescope and Chandra X-ray Observatory highlights how different the universe can look when viewed in other wavelengths of light. M82 is located 12 million light-years away in the Ursa Major constellation.
The comparison from NASA's Hubble telescope and Chandra X-ray Observatory highlights how different the universe can look when viewed in other wavelengths of light. M82 is located 12 million light-years away in the Ursa Major constellation.

Galaxy in Different Lights

The comparison from NASA's Hubble telescope and Chandra X-ray Observatory highlights how different the universe can look when viewed in other wavelengths of light. M82 is located 12 million light-years away in the Ursa Major constellation.

Mission: NuSTAR
Instrument: Chandra X-ray Telescope, Hubble Space Telescope
ID#: PIA18840
Added: 2014-10-08

Views: 3661

Galaxy in Different Lights

The comparison from NASA's Hubble telescope and Chandra X-ray Observatory highlights how different the universe can look when viewed in other wavelengths of light. M82 is located 12 million light-years away in the Ursa Major constellation.

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The blue dot in this image marks the spot of an energetic pulsar -- the magnetic, spinning core of star that blew up in a supernova explosion. NASA's NuSTAR discovered the pulsar by identifying its telltale pulse.
The blue dot in this image marks the spot of an energetic pulsar -- the magnetic, spinning core of star that blew up in a supernova explosion. NASA's NuSTAR discovered the pulsar by identifying its telltale pulse.

Powerful, Pulsating Core of Star

The blue dot in this image marks the spot of an energetic pulsar -- the magnetic, spinning core of star that blew up in a supernova explosion. NASA's NuSTAR discovered the pulsar by identifying its telltale pulse.

Mission: Chandra X-ray Observatory, NuSTAR
ID#: PIA18836
Added: 2014-09-16

Views: 1147

Powerful, Pulsating Core of Star

The blue dot in this image marks the spot of an energetic pulsar -- the magnetic, spinning core of star that blew up in a supernova explosion. NASA's NuSTAR discovered the pulsar by identifying its telltale pulse.

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This data plot captured by NASA's Nuclear Spectroscopic Telescope Array, or NuSTAR, shows X-ray light streaming from regions near a supermassive black hole known as Markarian 335.
This data plot captured by NASA's Nuclear Spectroscopic Telescope Array, or NuSTAR, shows X-ray light streaming from regions near a supermassive black hole known as Markarian 335.

Big, Spinning Black Hole Blurs Light

This data plot captured by NASA's Nuclear Spectroscopic Telescope Array, or NuSTAR, shows X-ray light streaming from regions near a supermassive black hole known as Markarian 335.

Mission: NuSTAR
Instrument: Nuclear Spectroscopic Telescope Array
ID#: PIA18467
Added: 2014-08-12

Views: 8821

Big, Spinning Black Hole Blurs Light

This data plot captured by NASA's Nuclear Spectroscopic Telescope Array, or NuSTAR, shows X-ray light streaming from regions near a supermassive black hole known as Markarian 335.

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The images at the top of this graphic represent two popular models describing how stars blast apart. The models point to different triggers of the explosion. Jet-driven models are illustrated with an artist's concept shown at left.
The images at the top of this graphic represent two popular models describing how stars blast apart. The models point to different triggers of the explosion. Jet-driven models are illustrated with an artist's concept shown at left.

NuSTAR Data Point to Sloshing Supernovas

The images at the top of this graphic represent two popular models describing how stars blast apart. The models point to different triggers of the explosion. Jet-driven models are illustrated with an artist's concept shown at left.

Mission: Chandra X-ray Observatory, NuSTAR
Instrument: Chandra X-ray Telescope, Nuclear Spectroscopic Telescope Array
ID#: PIA17846
Added: 2014-02-19

Views: 1479

NuSTAR Data Point to Sloshing Supernovas

The images at the top of this graphic represent two popular models describing how stars blast apart. The models point to different triggers of the explosion. Jet-driven models are illustrated with an artist's concept shown at left.

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NuSTAR has provided the first observational evidence in support of a theory that says exploding stars slosh around before detonating. That theory, referred to as mild asymmetries, is shown here in a simulation by Christian Ott.
NuSTAR has provided the first observational evidence in support of a theory that says exploding stars slosh around before detonating. That theory, referred to as mild asymmetries, is shown here in a simulation by Christian Ott.

Sloshing Star Goes Supernova

NuSTAR has provided the first observational evidence in support of a theory that says exploding stars slosh around before detonating. That theory, referred to as mild asymmetries, is shown here in a simulation by Christian Ott.

Mission: NuSTAR
ID#: PIA17845
Added: 2014-02-19

Views: 2687

Sloshing Star Goes Supernova

NuSTAR has provided the first observational evidence in support of a theory that says exploding stars slosh around before detonating. That theory, referred to as mild asymmetries, is shown here in a simulation by Christian Ott.

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A massive star (left), which has created elements as heavy as iron in its interior, blows up in a tremendous explosion (middle), scattering its outer layers in a structure called a supernova remnant (right).
A massive star (left), which has created elements as heavy as iron in its interior, blows up in a tremendous explosion (middle), scattering its outer layers in a structure called a supernova remnant (right).

Evolution of a Supernova

A massive star (left), which has created elements as heavy as iron in its interior, blows up in a tremendous explosion (middle), scattering its outer layers in a structure called a supernova remnant (right).

Mission: Chandra X-ray Observatory, NuSTAR
Instrument: Chandra X-ray Telescope, Nuclear Spectroscopic Telescope Array
ID#: PIA17844
Added: 2014-02-19

Views: 1683

Evolution of a Supernova

A massive star (left), which has created elements as heavy as iron in its interior, blows up in a tremendous explosion (middle), scattering its outer layers in a structure called a supernova remnant (right).

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When astronomers first looked at images of a supernova remnant called Cassiopeia A, captured by NASA's NuSTAR. The mystery of Cassiopeia A (Cas A), a massive star that exploded in a supernova more than 11,000 years ago continues to confound scientists.
When astronomers first looked at images of a supernova remnant called Cassiopeia A, captured by NASA's NuSTAR. The mystery of Cassiopeia A (Cas A), a massive star that exploded in a supernova more than 11,000 years ago continues to confound scientists.

The Case of Missing Iron in Cassiopeia A

When astronomers first looked at images of a supernova remnant called Cassiopeia A, captured by NASA's NuSTAR. The mystery of Cassiopeia A (Cas A), a massive star that exploded in a supernova more than 11,000 years ago continues to confound scientists.

Mission: Chandra X-ray Observatory, NuSTAR
Instrument: Chandra X-ray Telescope, Nuclear Spectroscopic Telescope Array
ID#: PIA17842
Added: 2014-02-19

Views: 1318

The Case of Missing Iron in Cassiopeia A

When astronomers first looked at images of a supernova remnant called Cassiopeia A, captured by NASA's NuSTAR. The mystery of Cassiopeia A (Cas A), a massive star that exploded in a supernova more than 11,000 years ago continues to confound scientists.

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NASA's NuSTAR has, for the first time, imaged the radioactive 'guts' of a supernova remnant, the leftover remains of a star that exploded. The NuSTAR data are blue, and show high-energy X-rays.
NASA's NuSTAR has, for the first time, imaged the radioactive 'guts' of a supernova remnant, the leftover remains of a star that exploded. The NuSTAR data are blue, and show high-energy X-rays.

Radioactive Core of a Dead Star

NASA's NuSTAR has, for the first time, imaged the radioactive 'guts' of a supernova remnant, the leftover remains of a star that exploded. The NuSTAR data are blue, and show high-energy X-rays.

Mission: Chandra X-ray Observatory, NuSTAR
Instrument: Chandra X-ray Telescope, Nuclear Spectroscopic Telescope Array
ID#: PIA17841
Added: 2014-02-19

Views: 3240

Radioactive Core of a Dead Star

NASA's NuSTAR has, for the first time, imaged the radioactive 'guts' of a supernova remnant, the leftover remains of a star that exploded. The NuSTAR data are blue, and show high-energy X-rays.

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This diagram illustrates why NASA's NuSTAR can see radioactivity in the remains of exploded stars for the first time. The observatory detects high-energy X-ray photons that are released by a radioactive substance called titanium-44.
This diagram illustrates why NASA's NuSTAR can see radioactivity in the remains of exploded stars for the first time. The observatory detects high-energy X-ray photons that are released by a radioactive substance called titanium-44.

The Creation of Titanium in Stars

This diagram illustrates why NASA's NuSTAR can see radioactivity in the remains of exploded stars for the first time. The observatory detects high-energy X-ray photons that are released by a radioactive substance called titanium-44.

Mission: NuSTAR
Instrument: Nuclear Spectroscopic Telescope Array
ID#: PIA17840
Added: 2014-02-19

Views: 1512

The Creation of Titanium in Stars

This diagram illustrates why NASA's NuSTAR can see radioactivity in the remains of exploded stars for the first time. The observatory detects high-energy X-ray photons that are released by a radioactive substance called titanium-44.

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NASA's NuSTAR is complementing previous observations of the Cassiopeia A supernova remnant (red and green) by providing the first maps of radioactive material forged in the fiery explosion (blue).
NASA's NuSTAR is complementing previous observations of the Cassiopeia A supernova remnant (red and green) by providing the first maps of radioactive material forged in the fiery explosion (blue).

Adding a New 'Color' to Palate of Cassiopeia A Images

NASA's NuSTAR is complementing previous observations of the Cassiopeia A supernova remnant (red and green) by providing the first maps of radioactive material forged in the fiery explosion (blue).

Mission: Chandra X-ray Observatory, NuSTAR
Instrument: Chandra X-ray Telescope, Nuclear Spectroscopic Telescope Array
ID#: PIA17839
Added: 2014-02-19

Views: 1871

Adding a New 'Color' to Palate of Cassiopeia A Images

NASA's NuSTAR is complementing previous observations of the Cassiopeia A supernova remnant (red and green) by providing the first maps of radioactive material forged in the fiery explosion (blue).

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This is the first map of radioactivity in a supernova remnant, the blown-out bits and pieces of a massive star that exploded. The blue color shows radioactive material mapped in high-energy X-rays using NASA's NuSTAR.
This is the first map of radioactivity in a supernova remnant, the blown-out bits and pieces of a massive star that exploded. The blue color shows radioactive material mapped in high-energy X-rays using NASA's NuSTAR.

Untangling the Remains of Cassiopeia A

This is the first map of radioactivity in a supernova remnant, the blown-out bits and pieces of a massive star that exploded. The blue color shows radioactive material mapped in high-energy X-rays using NASA's NuSTAR.

Mission: Chandra X-ray Observatory, NuSTAR
Instrument: Chandra X-ray Telescope, Nuclear Spectroscopic Telescope Array
ID#: PIA17838
Added: 2014-02-19

Views: 9193

Untangling the Remains of Cassiopeia A

This is the first map of radioactivity in a supernova remnant, the blown-out bits and pieces of a massive star that exploded. The blue color shows radioactive material mapped in high-energy X-rays using NASA's NuSTAR.

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A range of supermassive black holes lights up this new image from NASA's NuSTAR. All of the dots are active black holes tucked inside the hearts of galaxies, with colors representing different energies of X-ray light.
A range of supermassive black holes lights up this new image from NASA's NuSTAR. All of the dots are active black holes tucked inside the hearts of galaxies, with colors representing different energies of X-ray light.

Different Flavors of Black Holes

A range of supermassive black holes lights up this new image from NASA's NuSTAR. All of the dots are active black holes tucked inside the hearts of galaxies, with colors representing different energies of X-ray light.

Mission: NuSTAR
Instrument: NuSTAR
ID#: PIA17567
Added: 2014-01-09

Views: 11379

Different Flavors of Black Holes

A range of supermassive black holes lights up this new image from NASA's NuSTAR. All of the dots are active black holes tucked inside the hearts of galaxies, with colors representing different energies of X-ray light.

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Nicknamed the 'Hand of God,' this object is called a pulsar wind nebula, imaged by NASA's NuSTAR. It's powered by the leftover, dense core of a star that blew up in a supernova explosion.
Nicknamed the 'Hand of God,' this object is called a pulsar wind nebula, imaged by NASA's NuSTAR. It's powered by the leftover, dense core of a star that blew up in a supernova explosion.

High-Energy X-ray View of 'Hand of God'

Nicknamed the 'Hand of God,' this object is called a pulsar wind nebula, imaged by NASA's NuSTAR. It's powered by the leftover, dense core of a star that blew up in a supernova explosion.

Mission: NuSTAR
Instrument: NuSTAR
ID#: PIA17566
Added: 2014-01-09

Views: 26927

High-Energy X-ray View of 'Hand of God'

Nicknamed the 'Hand of God,' this object is called a pulsar wind nebula, imaged by NASA's NuSTAR. It's powered by the leftover, dense core of a star that blew up in a supernova explosion.

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The magenta spots in this image from NASA's NuSTAR show two black holes in the spiral galaxy called NGC 1313, or the Topsy Turvy galaxy, located about 13 million light-years away in the Reticulum constellation.
The magenta spots in this image from NASA's NuSTAR show two black holes in the spiral galaxy called NGC 1313, or the Topsy Turvy galaxy, located about 13 million light-years away in the Reticulum constellation.

Topsy Turvy Black Holes

The magenta spots in this image from NASA's NuSTAR show two black holes in the spiral galaxy called NGC 1313, or the Topsy Turvy galaxy, located about 13 million light-years away in the Reticulum constellation.

Mission: NuSTAR
Instrument: NuSTAR
ID#: PIA17561
Added: 2013-11-26

Views: 2168

Topsy Turvy Black Holes

The magenta spots in this image from NASA's NuSTAR show two black holes in the spiral galaxy called NGC 1313, or the Topsy Turvy galaxy, located about 13 million light-years away in the Reticulum constellation.

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Magenta spots in this image from NASA's NuSTAR show two black holes in the Circinus galaxy, located 13 million light-years from Earth in the Circinus constellation.
Magenta spots in this image from NASA's NuSTAR show two black holes in the Circinus galaxy, located 13 million light-years from Earth in the Circinus constellation.

Black Holes of the Circinus Galaxy

Magenta spots in this image from NASA's NuSTAR show two black holes in the Circinus galaxy, located 13 million light-years from Earth in the Circinus constellation.

Mission: NuSTAR
Instrument: NuSTAR
ID#: PIA17560
Added: 2013-11-26

Views: 2438

Black Holes of the Circinus Galaxy

Magenta spots in this image from NASA's NuSTAR show two black holes in the Circinus galaxy, located 13 million light-years from Earth in the Circinus constellation.

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NASA's NuSTAR's serendipitous discovery in this field lies to the left of a galaxy, called IC751, at which the telescope originally intended to look.
NASA's NuSTAR's serendipitous discovery in this field lies to the left of a galaxy, called IC751, at which the telescope originally intended to look.

Black Holes Shine for NuSTAR

NASA's NuSTAR's serendipitous discovery in this field lies to the left of a galaxy, called IC751, at which the telescope originally intended to look.

Mission: NuSTAR
Instrument: Nuclear Spectroscopic Telescope Array
ID#: PIA17440
Added: 2013-09-05

Views: 7932

Black Holes Shine for NuSTAR

NASA's NuSTAR's serendipitous discovery in this field lies to the left of a galaxy, called IC751, at which the telescope originally intended to look.

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