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The images at the top of this graphic represent two popular models describing how stars blast apart. The models point to different triggers of the explosion. Jet-driven models are illustrated with an artist's concept shown at left.
The images at the top of this graphic represent two popular models describing how stars blast apart. The models point to different triggers of the explosion. Jet-driven models are illustrated with an artist's concept shown at left.

NuSTAR Data Point to Sloshing Supernovas

The images at the top of this graphic represent two popular models describing how stars blast apart. The models point to different triggers of the explosion. Jet-driven models are illustrated with an artist's concept shown at left.

Mission: Chandra X-ray Observatory, NuSTAR
Instrument: Chandra X-ray Telescope, Nuclear Spectroscopic Telescope Array
Size: 3000 x 2400
ID#: PIA17846
Added: 2014-02-19

Views: 451

NuSTAR Data Point to Sloshing Supernovas

The images at the top of this graphic represent two popular models describing how stars blast apart. The models point to different triggers of the explosion. Jet-driven models are illustrated with an artist's concept shown at left.

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NuSTAR has provided the first observational evidence in support of a theory that says exploding stars slosh around before detonating. That theory, referred to as mild asymmetries, is shown here in a simulation by Christian Ott.
NuSTAR has provided the first observational evidence in support of a theory that says exploding stars slosh around before detonating. That theory, referred to as mild asymmetries, is shown here in a simulation by Christian Ott.

Sloshing Star Goes Supernova

NuSTAR has provided the first observational evidence in support of a theory that says exploding stars slosh around before detonating. That theory, referred to as mild asymmetries, is shown here in a simulation by Christian Ott.

Mission: NuSTAR
Size: 586 x 434
ID#: PIA17845
Added: 2014-02-19

Views: 481

Sloshing Star Goes Supernova

NuSTAR has provided the first observational evidence in support of a theory that says exploding stars slosh around before detonating. That theory, referred to as mild asymmetries, is shown here in a simulation by Christian Ott.

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A massive star (left), which has created elements as heavy as iron in its interior, blows up in a tremendous explosion (middle), scattering its outer layers in a structure called a supernova remnant (right).
A massive star (left), which has created elements as heavy as iron in its interior, blows up in a tremendous explosion (middle), scattering its outer layers in a structure called a supernova remnant (right).

Evolution of a Supernova

A massive star (left), which has created elements as heavy as iron in its interior, blows up in a tremendous explosion (middle), scattering its outer layers in a structure called a supernova remnant (right).

Mission: Chandra X-ray Observatory, NuSTAR
Instrument: Chandra X-ray Telescope, Nuclear Spectroscopic Telescope Array
Size: 3000 x 2000
ID#: PIA17844
Added: 2014-02-19

Views: 544

Evolution of a Supernova

A massive star (left), which has created elements as heavy as iron in its interior, blows up in a tremendous explosion (middle), scattering its outer layers in a structure called a supernova remnant (right).

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When astronomers first looked at images of a supernova remnant called Cassiopeia A, captured by NASA's NuSTAR. The mystery of Cassiopeia A (Cas A), a massive star that exploded in a supernova more than 11,000 years ago continues to confound scientists.
When astronomers first looked at images of a supernova remnant called Cassiopeia A, captured by NASA's NuSTAR. The mystery of Cassiopeia A (Cas A), a massive star that exploded in a supernova more than 11,000 years ago continues to confound scientists.

The Case of Missing Iron in Cassiopeia A

When astronomers first looked at images of a supernova remnant called Cassiopeia A, captured by NASA's NuSTAR. The mystery of Cassiopeia A (Cas A), a massive star that exploded in a supernova more than 11,000 years ago continues to confound scientists.

Mission: Chandra X-ray Observatory, NuSTAR
Instrument: Chandra X-ray Telescope, Nuclear Spectroscopic Telescope Array
Size: 2048 x 1024
ID#: PIA17842
Added: 2014-02-19

Views: 387

The Case of Missing Iron in Cassiopeia A

When astronomers first looked at images of a supernova remnant called Cassiopeia A, captured by NASA's NuSTAR. The mystery of Cassiopeia A (Cas A), a massive star that exploded in a supernova more than 11,000 years ago continues to confound scientists.

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NASA's NuSTAR has, for the first time, imaged the radioactive 'guts' of a supernova remnant, the leftover remains of a star that exploded. The NuSTAR data are blue, and show high-energy X-rays.
NASA's NuSTAR has, for the first time, imaged the radioactive 'guts' of a supernova remnant, the leftover remains of a star that exploded. The NuSTAR data are blue, and show high-energy X-rays.

Radioactive Core of a Dead Star

NASA's NuSTAR has, for the first time, imaged the radioactive 'guts' of a supernova remnant, the leftover remains of a star that exploded. The NuSTAR data are blue, and show high-energy X-rays.

Mission: Chandra X-ray Observatory, NuSTAR
Instrument: Chandra X-ray Telescope, Nuclear Spectroscopic Telescope Array
Size: 1024 x 1024
ID#: PIA17841
Added: 2014-02-19

Views: 1036

Radioactive Core of a Dead Star

NASA's NuSTAR has, for the first time, imaged the radioactive 'guts' of a supernova remnant, the leftover remains of a star that exploded. The NuSTAR data are blue, and show high-energy X-rays.

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This diagram illustrates why NASA's NuSTAR can see radioactivity in the remains of exploded stars for the first time. The observatory detects high-energy X-ray photons that are released by a radioactive substance called titanium-44.
This diagram illustrates why NASA's NuSTAR can see radioactivity in the remains of exploded stars for the first time. The observatory detects high-energy X-ray photons that are released by a radioactive substance called titanium-44.

The Creation of Titanium in Stars

This diagram illustrates why NASA's NuSTAR can see radioactivity in the remains of exploded stars for the first time. The observatory detects high-energy X-ray photons that are released by a radioactive substance called titanium-44.

Mission: NuSTAR
Instrument: Nuclear Spectroscopic Telescope Array
Size: 4000 x 2250
ID#: PIA17840
Added: 2014-02-19

Views: 417

The Creation of Titanium in Stars

This diagram illustrates why NASA's NuSTAR can see radioactivity in the remains of exploded stars for the first time. The observatory detects high-energy X-ray photons that are released by a radioactive substance called titanium-44.

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NASA's NuSTAR is complementing previous observations of the Cassiopeia A supernova remnant (red and green) by providing the first maps of radioactive material forged in the fiery explosion (blue).
NASA's NuSTAR is complementing previous observations of the Cassiopeia A supernova remnant (red and green) by providing the first maps of radioactive material forged in the fiery explosion (blue).

Adding a New 'Color' to Palate of Cassiopeia A Images

NASA's NuSTAR is complementing previous observations of the Cassiopeia A supernova remnant (red and green) by providing the first maps of radioactive material forged in the fiery explosion (blue).

Mission: Chandra X-ray Observatory, NuSTAR
Instrument: Chandra X-ray Telescope, Nuclear Spectroscopic Telescope Array
Size: 3072 x 1024
ID#: PIA17839
Added: 2014-02-19

Views: 715

Adding a New 'Color' to Palate of Cassiopeia A Images

NASA's NuSTAR is complementing previous observations of the Cassiopeia A supernova remnant (red and green) by providing the first maps of radioactive material forged in the fiery explosion (blue).

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This is the first map of radioactivity in a supernova remnant, the blown-out bits and pieces of a massive star that exploded. The blue color shows radioactive material mapped in high-energy X-rays using NASA's NuSTAR.
This is the first map of radioactivity in a supernova remnant, the blown-out bits and pieces of a massive star that exploded. The blue color shows radioactive material mapped in high-energy X-rays using NASA's NuSTAR.

Untangling the Remains of Cassiopeia A

This is the first map of radioactivity in a supernova remnant, the blown-out bits and pieces of a massive star that exploded. The blue color shows radioactive material mapped in high-energy X-rays using NASA's NuSTAR.

Mission: Chandra X-ray Observatory, NuSTAR
Instrument: Chandra X-ray Telescope, Nuclear Spectroscopic Telescope Array
Size: 3000 x 3000
ID#: PIA17838
Added: 2014-02-19

Views: 5258

Untangling the Remains of Cassiopeia A

This is the first map of radioactivity in a supernova remnant, the blown-out bits and pieces of a massive star that exploded. The blue color shows radioactive material mapped in high-energy X-rays using NASA's NuSTAR.

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A range of supermassive black holes lights up this new image from NASA's NuSTAR. All of the dots are active black holes tucked inside the hearts of galaxies, with colors representing different energies of X-ray light.
A range of supermassive black holes lights up this new image from NASA's NuSTAR. All of the dots are active black holes tucked inside the hearts of galaxies, with colors representing different energies of X-ray light.

Different Flavors of Black Holes

A range of supermassive black holes lights up this new image from NASA's NuSTAR. All of the dots are active black holes tucked inside the hearts of galaxies, with colors representing different energies of X-ray light.

Mission: NuSTAR
Instrument: NuSTAR
Size: 3300 x 2800
ID#: PIA17567
Added: 2014-01-09

Views: 9434

Different Flavors of Black Holes

A range of supermassive black holes lights up this new image from NASA's NuSTAR. All of the dots are active black holes tucked inside the hearts of galaxies, with colors representing different energies of X-ray light.

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Nicknamed the 'Hand of God,' this object is called a pulsar wind nebula, imaged by NASA's NuSTAR. It's powered by the leftover, dense core of a star that blew up in a supernova explosion.
Nicknamed the 'Hand of God,' this object is called a pulsar wind nebula, imaged by NASA's NuSTAR. It's powered by the leftover, dense core of a star that blew up in a supernova explosion.

High-Energy X-ray View of 'Hand of God'

Nicknamed the 'Hand of God,' this object is called a pulsar wind nebula, imaged by NASA's NuSTAR. It's powered by the leftover, dense core of a star that blew up in a supernova explosion.

Mission: NuSTAR
Instrument: NuSTAR
Size: 2500 x 2500
ID#: PIA17566
Added: 2014-01-09

Views: 16615

High-Energy X-ray View of 'Hand of God'

Nicknamed the 'Hand of God,' this object is called a pulsar wind nebula, imaged by NASA's NuSTAR. It's powered by the leftover, dense core of a star that blew up in a supernova explosion.

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The magenta spots in this image from NASA's NuSTAR show two black holes in the spiral galaxy called NGC 1313, or the Topsy Turvy galaxy, located about 13 million light-years away in the Reticulum constellation.
The magenta spots in this image from NASA's NuSTAR show two black holes in the spiral galaxy called NGC 1313, or the Topsy Turvy galaxy, located about 13 million light-years away in the Reticulum constellation.

Topsy Turvy Black Holes

The magenta spots in this image from NASA's NuSTAR show two black holes in the spiral galaxy called NGC 1313, or the Topsy Turvy galaxy, located about 13 million light-years away in the Reticulum constellation.

Mission: NuSTAR
Instrument: NuSTAR
Size: 1400 x 1400
ID#: PIA17561
Added: 2013-11-26

Views: 1108

Topsy Turvy Black Holes

The magenta spots in this image from NASA's NuSTAR show two black holes in the spiral galaxy called NGC 1313, or the Topsy Turvy galaxy, located about 13 million light-years away in the Reticulum constellation.

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Magenta spots in this image from NASA's NuSTAR show two black holes in the Circinus galaxy, located 13 million light-years from Earth in the Circinus constellation.
Magenta spots in this image from NASA's NuSTAR show two black holes in the Circinus galaxy, located 13 million light-years from Earth in the Circinus constellation.

Black Holes of the Circinus Galaxy

Magenta spots in this image from NASA's NuSTAR show two black holes in the Circinus galaxy, located 13 million light-years from Earth in the Circinus constellation.

Mission: NuSTAR
Instrument: NuSTAR
Size: 1600 x 1600
ID#: PIA17560
Added: 2013-11-26

Views: 1073

Black Holes of the Circinus Galaxy

Magenta spots in this image from NASA's NuSTAR show two black holes in the Circinus galaxy, located 13 million light-years from Earth in the Circinus constellation.

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NASA's NuSTAR's serendipitous discovery in this field lies to the left of a galaxy, called IC751, at which the telescope originally intended to look.
NASA's NuSTAR's serendipitous discovery in this field lies to the left of a galaxy, called IC751, at which the telescope originally intended to look.

Black Holes Shine for NuSTAR

NASA's NuSTAR's serendipitous discovery in this field lies to the left of a galaxy, called IC751, at which the telescope originally intended to look.

Mission: NuSTAR
Instrument: Nuclear Spectroscopic Telescope Array
Size: 3200 x 1800
ID#: PIA17440
Added: 2013-09-05

Views: 5535

Black Holes Shine for NuSTAR

NASA's NuSTAR's serendipitous discovery in this field lies to the left of a galaxy, called IC751, at which the telescope originally intended to look.

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The Sculptor galaxy is seen in a new light, in this composite image from NASA's Nuclear Spectroscopic Telescope Array (NuSTAR) and the European Southern Observatory in Chile.
The Sculptor galaxy is seen in a new light, in this composite image from NASA's Nuclear Spectroscopic Telescope Array (NuSTAR) and the European Southern Observatory in Chile.

Sculptor Galaxy Shines with X-rays

The Sculptor galaxy is seen in a new light, in this composite image from NASA's Nuclear Spectroscopic Telescope Array (NuSTAR) and the European Southern Observatory in Chile.

Mission: NuSTAR
Instrument: Nuclear Spectroscopic Telescope Array
Size: 6620 x 3724
ID#: PIA17244
Added: 2013-06-11

Views: 2349

Sculptor Galaxy Shines with X-rays

The Sculptor galaxy is seen in a new light, in this composite image from NASA's Nuclear Spectroscopic Telescope Array (NuSTAR) and the European Southern Observatory in Chile.

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NASA's NuSTAR, has helped to show that the spin rates of black holes can be measured conclusively. The solid lines show two theoretical models that explain low-energy X-ray emission seen previously from the spiral galaxy NGC 1365 by XMM-Newton.
NASA's NuSTAR, has helped to show that the spin rates of black holes can be measured conclusively. The solid lines show two theoretical models that explain low-energy X-ray emission seen previously from the spiral galaxy NGC 1365 by XMM-Newton.

Two X-Ray Observatories are Better Than One

NASA's NuSTAR, has helped to show that the spin rates of black holes can be measured conclusively. The solid lines show two theoretical models that explain low-energy X-ray emission seen previously from the spiral galaxy NGC 1365 by XMM-Newton.

Mission: NuSTAR, XMM-Newton
Size: 4266 x 2400
ID#: PIA16870
Added: 2013-02-27

Views: 1622

Two X-Ray Observatories are Better Than One

NASA's NuSTAR, has helped to show that the spin rates of black holes can be measured conclusively. The solid lines show two theoretical models that explain low-energy X-ray emission seen previously from the spiral galaxy NGC 1365 by XMM-Newton.

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This image taken by the ultraviolet-light monitoring camera on the European Space Agency's (ESA's) XMM-Newton telescope shows the beautiful spiral arms of the galaxy NGC1365.
This image taken by the ultraviolet-light monitoring camera on the European Space Agency's (ESA's) XMM-Newton telescope shows the beautiful spiral arms of the galaxy NGC1365.

NuSTAR's Improved View

This image taken by the ultraviolet-light monitoring camera on the European Space Agency's (ESA's) XMM-Newton telescope shows the beautiful spiral arms of the galaxy NGC1365.

Mission: NuSTAR, XMM-Newton
Size: 3000 x 2400
ID#: PIA16699
Added: 2013-02-27

Views: 1676

NuSTAR's Improved View

This image taken by the ultraviolet-light monitoring camera on the European Space Agency's (ESA's) XMM-Newton telescope shows the beautiful spiral arms of the galaxy NGC1365.

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This chart depicts the electromagnetic spectrum, highlighting the X-ray portion. NASA's NuSTAR and ESA's XMM-Newton telescope complement each other by seeing different colors of X-ray light.
This chart depicts the electromagnetic spectrum, highlighting the X-ray portion. NASA's NuSTAR and ESA's XMM-Newton telescope complement each other by seeing different colors of X-ray light.

Complementary X-Ray Vision

This chart depicts the electromagnetic spectrum, highlighting the X-ray portion. NASA's NuSTAR and ESA's XMM-Newton telescope complement each other by seeing different colors of X-ray light.

Mission: NuSTAR, XMM-Newton
Size: 3000 x 1731
ID#: PIA16698
Added: 2013-02-27

Views: 1617

Complementary X-Ray Vision

This chart depicts the electromagnetic spectrum, highlighting the X-ray portion. NASA's NuSTAR and ESA's XMM-Newton telescope complement each other by seeing different colors of X-ray light.

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Scientists measure the spin rates of supermassive black holes by spreading the X-ray light into different colors. The light comes from accretion disks that swirl around black holes, as shown in both of the artist's concepts.
Scientists measure the spin rates of supermassive black holes by spreading the X-ray light into different colors. The light comes from accretion disks that swirl around black holes, as shown in both of the artist's concepts.

Two Models of Black Hole Spin (Artist's Concept)

Scientists measure the spin rates of supermassive black holes by spreading the X-ray light into different colors. The light comes from accretion disks that swirl around black holes, as shown in both of the artist's concepts.

Mission: NuSTAR, XMM-Newton
Size: 3600 x 2400
ID#: PIA16697
Added: 2013-02-27

Views: 1999

Two Models of Black Hole Spin (Artist's Concept)

Scientists measure the spin rates of supermassive black holes by spreading the X-ray light into different colors. The light comes from accretion disks that swirl around black holes, as shown in both of the artist's concepts.

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Black holes are tremendous objects whose immense gravity can distort and twist space-time, the fabric that shapes our universe as this chart from NASA's NuSTAR and ESA's XMM-Newton telescope illustrates.
Black holes are tremendous objects whose immense gravity can distort and twist space-time, the fabric that shapes our universe as this chart from NASA's NuSTAR and ESA's XMM-Newton telescope illustrates.

How to Measure the Spin of a Black Hole (Artist's Concept)

Black holes are tremendous objects whose immense gravity can distort and twist space-time, the fabric that shapes our universe as this chart from NASA's NuSTAR and ESA's XMM-Newton telescope illustrates.

Mission: NuSTAR, XMM-Newton
Size: 3600 x 2400
ID#: PIA16696
Added: 2013-02-27

Views: 2364

How to Measure the Spin of a Black Hole (Artist's Concept)

Black holes are tremendous objects whose immense gravity can distort and twist space-time, the fabric that shapes our universe as this chart from NASA's NuSTAR and ESA's XMM-Newton telescope illustrates.

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This artist's concept illustrates a supermassive black hole with millions to billions times the mass of our sun. Supermassive black holes are enormously dense objects buried at the hearts of galaxies.
This artist's concept illustrates a supermassive black hole with millions to billions times the mass of our sun. Supermassive black holes are enormously dense objects buried at the hearts of galaxies.

Black Holes: Monsters in Space (Artist's Concept)

This artist's concept illustrates a supermassive black hole with millions to billions times the mass of our sun. Supermassive black holes are enormously dense objects buried at the hearts of galaxies.

Mission: NuSTAR
Size: 4400 x 2475
ID#: PIA16695
Added: 2013-02-27

Views: 5923

Black Holes: Monsters in Space (Artist's Concept)

This artist's concept illustrates a supermassive black hole with millions to billions times the mass of our sun. Supermassive black holes are enormously dense objects buried at the hearts of galaxies.

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This new view of the historical supernova remnant Cassiopeia A, located 11,000 light-years away, was taken by NASA's Nuclear Spectroscopic Telescope Array, or NuSTAR. While the star is long dead, its remains are still bursting with action.
This new view of the historical supernova remnant Cassiopeia A, located 11,000 light-years away, was taken by NASA's Nuclear Spectroscopic Telescope Array, or NuSTAR. While the star is long dead, its remains are still bursting with action.

Sizzling Remains of a Dead Star

This new view of the historical supernova remnant Cassiopeia A, located 11,000 light-years away, was taken by NASA's Nuclear Spectroscopic Telescope Array, or NuSTAR. While the star is long dead, its remains are still bursting with action.

Target: Cassiopeia A
Mission: NuSTAR
Instrument: Nuclear Spectroscopic Telescope Array
Size: 2200 x 2200
ID#: PIA16606
Added: 2013-01-07

Views: 4742

Sizzling Remains of a Dead Star

This new view of the historical supernova remnant Cassiopeia A, located 11,000 light-years away, was taken by NASA's Nuclear Spectroscopic Telescope Array, or NuSTAR. While the star is long dead, its remains are still bursting with action.

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This new view of spiral galaxy IC 342, also known as Caldwell 5, includes data from NASA's Nuclear Spectroscopic Telescope Array, or NuSTAR. IC 342 lies 7 million light-years away in the Camelopardalis constellation.
This new view of spiral galaxy IC 342, also known as Caldwell 5, includes data from NASA's Nuclear Spectroscopic Telescope Array, or NuSTAR. IC 342 lies 7 million light-years away in the Camelopardalis constellation.

Blazing Black Holes Spotted in Spiral Beauty

This new view of spiral galaxy IC 342, also known as Caldwell 5, includes data from NASA's Nuclear Spectroscopic Telescope Array, or NuSTAR. IC 342 lies 7 million light-years away in the Camelopardalis constellation.

Mission: NuSTAR
Instrument: Nuclear Spectroscopic Telescope Array
Size: 1700 x 1700
ID#: PIA16605
Added: 2013-01-07

Views: 7363

Blazing Black Holes Spotted in Spiral Beauty

This new view of spiral galaxy IC 342, also known as Caldwell 5, includes data from NASA's Nuclear Spectroscopic Telescope Array, or NuSTAR. IC 342 lies 7 million light-years away in the Camelopardalis constellation.

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NASA's NuSTAR has captured these first, focused views of the supermassive black hole at the heart of our Milky Way galaxy in high-energy X-ray light.
NASA's NuSTAR has captured these first, focused views of the supermassive black hole at the heart of our Milky Way galaxy in high-energy X-ray light.

Pointing X-ray Eyes at our Resident Supermassive Black Hole

NASA's NuSTAR has captured these first, focused views of the supermassive black hole at the heart of our Milky Way galaxy in high-energy X-ray light.

Mission: NuSTAR
Instrument: Nuclear Spectroscopic Telescope Array, Spitzer Space Telescope
Size: 4000 x 2400
ID#: PIA16214
Added: 2012-10-23

Views: 2340

Pointing X-ray Eyes at our Resident Supermassive Black Hole

NASA's NuSTAR has captured these first, focused views of the supermassive black hole at the heart of our Milky Way galaxy in high-energy X-ray light.

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These images, taken by NASA's black-hole hunter, NuSTAR, are the first, focused high-energy X-ray views of the area surrounding the supermassive black hole, called Sagittarius A*, at the center of our galaxy.
These images, taken by NASA's black-hole hunter, NuSTAR, are the first, focused high-energy X-ray views of the area surrounding the supermassive black hole, called Sagittarius A*, at the center of our galaxy.

First Look at Milky Way's Monster in High-Energy X-ray Light

These images, taken by NASA's black-hole hunter, NuSTAR, are the first, focused high-energy X-ray views of the area surrounding the supermassive black hole, called Sagittarius A*, at the center of our galaxy.

Mission: NuSTAR
Instrument: Nuclear Spectroscopic Telescope Array
Size: 3202 x 2402
ID#: PIA16213
Added: 2012-10-23

Views: 2265

First Look at Milky Way's Monster in High-Energy X-ray Light

These images, taken by NASA's black-hole hunter, NuSTAR, are the first, focused high-energy X-ray views of the area surrounding the supermassive black hole, called Sagittarius A*, at the center of our galaxy.

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NASA's NuSTAR has taken its first snapshots of the highest energy X-rays in the cosmos, the same kind used by doctors to take pictures of your bones. NuSTAR chose a black hole in the constellation Cygnus as its first target due to its brightness.
NASA's NuSTAR has taken its first snapshots of the highest energy X-rays in the cosmos, the same kind used by doctors to take pictures of your bones. NuSTAR chose a black hole in the constellation Cygnus as its first target due to its brightness.

NuSTAR's First View of High-Energy X-ray Universe

NASA's NuSTAR has taken its first snapshots of the highest energy X-rays in the cosmos, the same kind used by doctors to take pictures of your bones. NuSTAR chose a black hole in the constellation Cygnus as its first target due to its brightness.

Mission: NuSTAR
Size: 1366 x 1024
ID#: PIA15804
Added: 2012-06-28

Views: 2344

NuSTAR's First View of High-Energy X-ray Universe

NASA's NuSTAR has taken its first snapshots of the highest energy X-rays in the cosmos, the same kind used by doctors to take pictures of your bones. NuSTAR chose a black hole in the constellation Cygnus as its first target due to its brightness.

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