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Although Janus should be the least lonely of all moons -- sharing its orbit with Epimetheus -- it still spends most of its orbit far from other moons, alone in the vastness of space in this image from NASA's Cassini spacecraft.
Although Janus should be the least lonely of all moons -- sharing its orbit with Epimetheus -- it still spends most of its orbit far from other moons, alone in the vastness of space in this image from NASA's Cassini spacecraft.

Janus Stands Alone

Although Janus should be the least lonely of all moons -- sharing its orbit with Epimetheus -- it still spends most of its orbit far from other moons, alone in the vastness of space in this image from NASA's Cassini spacecraft.

Target: Janus
Mission: Cassini-Huygens
Spacecraft: Cassini Orbiter
Instrument: Imaging Science Subsystem - Narrow Angle
ID#: PIA18315
Added: 2015-05-18

Views: 71

Janus Stands Alone

Although Janus should be the least lonely of all moons -- sharing its orbit with Epimetheus -- it still spends most of its orbit far from other moons, alone in the vastness of space in this image from NASA's Cassini spacecraft.

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Not all of Saturn's rings are created equal: here the C and D rings appear side-by-side, but the C ring, which occupies the bottom half of this image, clearly outshines its neighbor. This image is from NASA's Cassini spacecraft.
Not all of Saturn's rings are created equal: here the C and D rings appear side-by-side, but the C ring, which occupies the bottom half of this image, clearly outshines its neighbor. This image is from NASA's Cassini spacecraft.

Faint D Ring

Not all of Saturn's rings are created equal: here the C and D rings appear side-by-side, but the C ring, which occupies the bottom half of this image, clearly outshines its neighbor. This image is from NASA's Cassini spacecraft.

Target: S Rings
Mission: Cassini-Huygens
Spacecraft: Cassini Orbiter
Instrument: Imaging Science Subsystem - Narrow Angle
ID#: PIA18313
Added: 2015-04-27

Views: 158

Faint D Ring

Not all of Saturn's rings are created equal: here the C and D rings appear side-by-side, but the C ring, which occupies the bottom half of this image, clearly outshines its neighbor. This image is from NASA's Cassini spacecraft.

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Surface features on Rhea, mostly impact craters in this image from NASA's Cassini spacecraft, are thrown into sharp relief thanks to long shadows.
Surface features on Rhea, mostly impact craters in this image from NASA's Cassini spacecraft, are thrown into sharp relief thanks to long shadows.

Rhea in Relief

Surface features on Rhea, mostly impact craters in this image from NASA's Cassini spacecraft, are thrown into sharp relief thanks to long shadows.

Target: Rhea
Mission: Cassini-Huygens
Spacecraft: Cassini Orbiter
Instrument: Imaging Science Subsystem - Narrow Angle
ID#: PIA18310
Added: 2015-04-20

Views: 4159

Rhea in Relief

Surface features on Rhea, mostly impact craters in this image from NASA's Cassini spacecraft, are thrown into sharp relief thanks to long shadows.

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Although we are used to seeing Saturn's moons lit directly by the Sun, sometimes we can catch them illuminated by 'Saturnshine.' Here, NASA's Cassini spacecraft see Mimas (upper right) lit by light reflected off of Saturn.
Although we are used to seeing Saturn's moons lit directly by the Sun, sometimes we can catch them illuminated by 'Saturnshine.' Here, NASA's Cassini spacecraft see Mimas (upper right) lit by light reflected off of Saturn.

Mimas by Saturnshine

Although we are used to seeing Saturn's moons lit directly by the Sun, sometimes we can catch them illuminated by 'Saturnshine.' Here, NASA's Cassini spacecraft see Mimas (upper right) lit by light reflected off of Saturn.

Target: Mimas
Mission: Cassini-Huygens
Spacecraft: Cassini Orbiter
Instrument: Imaging Science Subsystem - Narrow Angle
ID#: PIA18312
Added: 2015-04-13

Views: 417

Mimas by Saturnshine

Although we are used to seeing Saturn's moons lit directly by the Sun, sometimes we can catch them illuminated by 'Saturnshine.' Here, NASA's Cassini spacecraft see Mimas (upper right) lit by light reflected off of Saturn.

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NASA's Cassini spacecraft stared toward Saturn's two-toned moon Iapetus for about a week in early 2015, in a campaign motivated in part to investigate subtle color differences within the moon's bright terrain.
NASA's Cassini spacecraft stared toward Saturn's two-toned moon Iapetus for about a week in early 2015, in a campaign motivated in part to investigate subtle color differences within the moon's bright terrain.

Investigating Subtle Colors on Iapetus

NASA's Cassini spacecraft stared toward Saturn's two-toned moon Iapetus for about a week in early 2015, in a campaign motivated in part to investigate subtle color differences within the moon's bright terrain.

Target: Iapetus
Mission: Cassini-Huygens
Spacecraft: Cassini Orbiter
Instrument: Imaging Science Subsystem - Narrow Angle
ID#: PIA19062
Added: 2015-04-06

Views: 332

Investigating Subtle Colors on Iapetus

NASA's Cassini spacecraft stared toward Saturn's two-toned moon Iapetus for about a week in early 2015, in a campaign motivated in part to investigate subtle color differences within the moon's bright terrain.

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NASA's Cassini captured these views of Saturn's icy moon Rhea on Feb. 9. The spacecraft returned to equatorial orbits around Saturn in March after nearly two years, allowing the mission to once again have close encounters with moons other than Titan.
NASA's Cassini captured these views of Saturn's icy moon Rhea on Feb. 9. The spacecraft returned to equatorial orbits around Saturn in March after nearly two years, allowing the mission to once again have close encounters with moons other than Titan.

Return to Rhea

NASA's Cassini captured these views of Saturn's icy moon Rhea on Feb. 9. The spacecraft returned to equatorial orbits around Saturn in March after nearly two years, allowing the mission to once again have close encounters with moons other than Titan.

Target: Rhea
Mission: Cassini-Huygens
Spacecraft: Cassini Orbiter
Instrument: Imaging Science Subsystem - Narrow Angle, Imaging Science Subsystem - Wide Angle
ID#: PIA19057
Added: 2015-03-30

Views: 11398

Return to Rhea

NASA's Cassini captured these views of Saturn's icy moon Rhea on Feb. 9. The spacecraft returned to equatorial orbits around Saturn in March after nearly two years, allowing the mission to once again have close encounters with moons other than Titan.

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Much as its name implies, tiny Epimetheus (Greek for hindsight) was discovered in hindsight. It was only later that astronomers realized that Janus and Epithemeus were not the same object.
Much as its name implies, tiny Epimetheus (Greek for hindsight) was discovered in hindsight. It was only later that astronomers realized that Janus and Epithemeus were not the same object.

20-20 Hindsight

Much as its name implies, tiny Epimetheus (Greek for hindsight) was discovered in hindsight. It was only later that astronomers realized that Janus and Epithemeus were not the same object.

Target: S Rings
Mission: Cassini-Huygens
Spacecraft: Cassini Orbiter
Instrument: Imaging Science Subsystem - Narrow Angle
ID#: PIA18305
Added: 2015-03-30

Views: 441

20-20 Hindsight

Much as its name implies, tiny Epimetheus (Greek for hindsight) was discovered in hindsight. It was only later that astronomers realized that Janus and Epithemeus were not the same object.

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The moon Iapetus, like the 'force' in Star Wars, has both a light side and a dark side. Scientists think that Iapetus' dark/light asymmetry was actually created by material migrating away from the dark side.
The moon Iapetus, like the 'force' in Star Wars, has both a light side and a dark side. Scientists think that Iapetus' dark/light asymmetry was actually created by material migrating away from the dark side.

Path to the Dark Side

The moon Iapetus, like the 'force' in Star Wars, has both a light side and a dark side. Scientists think that Iapetus' dark/light asymmetry was actually created by material migrating away from the dark side.

Target: Iapetus
Mission: Cassini-Huygens
Spacecraft: Cassini Orbiter
Instrument: Imaging Science Subsystem - Narrow Angle
ID#: PIA18307
Added: 2015-03-09

Views: 744

Path to the Dark Side

The moon Iapetus, like the 'force' in Star Wars, has both a light side and a dark side. Scientists think that Iapetus' dark/light asymmetry was actually created by material migrating away from the dark side.

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Named after a Japanese paradise, NASA's Cassini spacecraft spies the Senkyo region of Titan), a bit less welcoming than its namesake with a very inhospitable average temperature of approximately 290 degrees below zero Fahrenheit (-180 degrees Celsius).
Named after a Japanese paradise, NASA's Cassini spacecraft spies the Senkyo region of Titan), a bit less welcoming than its namesake with a very inhospitable average temperature of approximately 290 degrees below zero Fahrenheit (-180 degrees Celsius).

Frozen Paradise

Named after a Japanese paradise, NASA's Cassini spacecraft spies the Senkyo region of Titan), a bit less welcoming than its namesake with a very inhospitable average temperature of approximately 290 degrees below zero Fahrenheit (-180 degrees Celsius).

Target: Titan
Mission: Cassini-Huygens
Spacecraft: Cassini Orbiter
Instrument: Imaging Science Subsystem - Narrow Angle
ID#: PIA18309
Added: 2015-03-02

Views: 627

Frozen Paradise

Named after a Japanese paradise, NASA's Cassini spacecraft spies the Senkyo region of Titan), a bit less welcoming than its namesake with a very inhospitable average temperature of approximately 290 degrees below zero Fahrenheit (-180 degrees Celsius).

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Saturn's oblateness, the varying opacity of its rings and the shadows cast by those rings, sometimes creates elaborate and complicated patterns from NASA's Cassini's perspective.
Saturn's oblateness, the varying opacity of its rings and the shadows cast by those rings, sometimes creates elaborate and complicated patterns from NASA's Cassini's perspective.

Cubist Saturn

Saturn's oblateness, the varying opacity of its rings and the shadows cast by those rings, sometimes creates elaborate and complicated patterns from NASA's Cassini's perspective.

Target: S Rings
Mission: Cassini-Huygens
Spacecraft: Cassini Orbiter
Instrument: Imaging Science Subsystem - Narrow Angle
ID#: PIA18303
Added: 2015-02-23

Views: 369

Cubist Saturn

Saturn's oblateness, the varying opacity of its rings and the shadows cast by those rings, sometimes creates elaborate and complicated patterns from NASA's Cassini's perspective.

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In reality, Janus and the rings both orbit Saturn and are only weakly connected to each other through their mutual gravitational tugs as seen by NASA's Cassini spacecraft.
In reality, Janus and the rings both orbit Saturn and are only weakly connected to each other through their mutual gravitational tugs as seen by NASA's Cassini spacecraft.

Janus the Jewel

In reality, Janus and the rings both orbit Saturn and are only weakly connected to each other through their mutual gravitational tugs as seen by NASA's Cassini spacecraft.

Target: Janus
Mission: Cassini-Huygens
Spacecraft: Cassini Orbiter
Instrument: Imaging Science Subsystem - Narrow Angle
ID#: PIA18304
Added: 2015-02-16

Views: 695

Janus the Jewel

In reality, Janus and the rings both orbit Saturn and are only weakly connected to each other through their mutual gravitational tugs as seen by NASA's Cassini spacecraft.

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Many color images are taken by NASA's Cassini spacecraft in red light so scientists can study the often subtle color variations of Saturn's rings. These variations may reveal clues about the chemical composition and physical nature of the rings.
Many color images are taken by NASA's Cassini spacecraft in red light so scientists can study the often subtle color variations of Saturn's rings. These variations may reveal clues about the chemical composition and physical nature of the rings.

Study in Scarlet

Many color images are taken by NASA's Cassini spacecraft in red light so scientists can study the often subtle color variations of Saturn's rings. These variations may reveal clues about the chemical composition and physical nature of the rings.

Target: S Rings
Mission: Cassini-Huygens
Spacecraft: Cassini Orbiter
Instrument: Imaging Science Subsystem - Narrow Angle
ID#: PIA18301
Added: 2015-02-09

Views: 436

Study in Scarlet

Many color images are taken by NASA's Cassini spacecraft in red light so scientists can study the often subtle color variations of Saturn's rings. These variations may reveal clues about the chemical composition and physical nature of the rings.

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Tiny Epimetheus is dwarfed by adjacent slivers of the A and F rings in this image from NASA's Cassini spacecraft.
Tiny Epimetheus is dwarfed by adjacent slivers of the A and F rings in this image from NASA's Cassini spacecraft.

Deceptively Small

Tiny Epimetheus is dwarfed by adjacent slivers of the A and F rings in this image from NASA's Cassini spacecraft.

Target: Epimetheus
Mission: Cassini-Huygens
Spacecraft: Cassini Orbiter
Instrument: Imaging Science Subsystem - Narrow Angle
ID#: PIA18302
Added: 2015-02-02

Views: 1195

Deceptively Small

Tiny Epimetheus is dwarfed by adjacent slivers of the A and F rings in this image from NASA's Cassini spacecraft.

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Two masters of their craft are caught at work shaping Saturn's rings captured by NASA's Cassini spacecraft. Pandora (upper right) sculpts the F ring. Meanwhile, Daphnis is busy holding open the Keeler gap (bottom center).
Two masters of their craft are caught at work shaping Saturn's rings captured by NASA's Cassini spacecraft. Pandora (upper right) sculpts the F ring. Meanwhile, Daphnis is busy holding open the Keeler gap (bottom center).

The Shapers

Two masters of their craft are caught at work shaping Saturn's rings captured by NASA's Cassini spacecraft. Pandora (upper right) sculpts the F ring. Meanwhile, Daphnis is busy holding open the Keeler gap (bottom center).

Target: S Rings
Mission: Cassini-Huygens
Spacecraft: Cassini Orbiter
Instrument: Imaging Science Subsystem - Narrow Angle
ID#: PIA18298
Added: 2015-01-26

Views: 408

The Shapers

Two masters of their craft are caught at work shaping Saturn's rings captured by NASA's Cassini spacecraft. Pandora (upper right) sculpts the F ring. Meanwhile, Daphnis is busy holding open the Keeler gap (bottom center).

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Janus seems to almost stare off into the distance, contemplating deep, moonish thoughts as the F ring stands by at the bottom of this image from NASA's Cassini spacecraft.
Janus seems to almost stare off into the distance, contemplating deep, moonish thoughts as the F ring stands by at the bottom of this image from NASA's Cassini spacecraft.

Contemplative Janus

Janus seems to almost stare off into the distance, contemplating deep, moonish thoughts as the F ring stands by at the bottom of this image from NASA's Cassini spacecraft.

Target: Janus
Mission: Cassini-Huygens
Spacecraft: Cassini Orbiter
Instrument: Imaging Science Subsystem - Narrow Angle
ID#: PIA18299
Added: 2015-01-19

Views: 482

Contemplative Janus

Janus seems to almost stare off into the distance, contemplating deep, moonish thoughts as the F ring stands by at the bottom of this image from NASA's Cassini spacecraft.

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A bright spot can be seen on the left side of Rhea in this image from NASA's Cassini spacecraft. The spot is the crater Inktomi, named for a Lakota spider spirit.
A bright spot can be seen on the left side of Rhea in this image from NASA's Cassini spacecraft. The spot is the crater Inktomi, named for a Lakota spider spirit.

Little Bright Spot

A bright spot can be seen on the left side of Rhea in this image from NASA's Cassini spacecraft. The spot is the crater Inktomi, named for a Lakota spider spirit.

Target: Rhea
Mission: Cassini-Huygens
Spacecraft: Cassini Orbiter
Instrument: Imaging Science Subsystem - Narrow Angle
ID#: PIA18300
Added: 2015-01-12

Views: 982

Little Bright Spot

A bright spot can be seen on the left side of Rhea in this image from NASA's Cassini spacecraft. The spot is the crater Inktomi, named for a Lakota spider spirit.

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What's that bright point of light in the outer A ring? It's a star, bright enough to be visible through the ring as seen by NASA's Cassini spacecraft.
What's that bright point of light in the outer A ring? It's a star, bright enough to be visible through the ring as seen by NASA's Cassini spacecraft.

Wish Upon a Star

What's that bright point of light in the outer A ring? It's a star, bright enough to be visible through the ring as seen by NASA's Cassini spacecraft.

Target: S Rings
Mission: Cassini-Huygens
Spacecraft: Cassini Orbiter
Instrument: Imaging Science Subsystem - Narrow Angle
ID#: PIA18297
Added: 2015-01-05

Views: 2434

Wish Upon a Star

What's that bright point of light in the outer A ring? It's a star, bright enough to be visible through the ring as seen by NASA's Cassini spacecraft.

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NASA's Cassini orbiter looks toward the trailing hemisphere of Mimas.
NASA's Cassini orbiter looks toward the trailing hemisphere of Mimas.

Polar Scars

NASA's Cassini orbiter looks toward the trailing hemisphere of Mimas.

Target: Mimas
Mission: Cassini-Huygens
Spacecraft: Cassini Orbiter
Instrument: Imaging Science Subsystem - Narrow Angle
ID#: PIA18292
Added: 2014-12-29

Views: 3389

Polar Scars

NASA's Cassini orbiter looks toward the trailing hemisphere of Mimas.

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NASA's Cassini orbiter shows that Tethys appears to be peeking out from behind Rhea, watching the watcher. Scientists believe that Tethys' surprisingly high albedo is due to the water ice jets emerging from its neighbor, Enceladus.
NASA's Cassini orbiter shows that Tethys appears to be peeking out from behind Rhea, watching the watcher. Scientists believe that Tethys' surprisingly high albedo is due to the water ice jets emerging from its neighbor, Enceladus.

Tethys the Spy

NASA's Cassini orbiter shows that Tethys appears to be peeking out from behind Rhea, watching the watcher. Scientists believe that Tethys' surprisingly high albedo is due to the water ice jets emerging from its neighbor, Enceladus.

Target: Tethys
Mission: Cassini-Huygens
Spacecraft: Cassini Orbiter
Instrument: Imaging Science Subsystem - Narrow Angle
ID#: PIA18293
Added: 2014-12-15

Views: 1520

Tethys the Spy

NASA's Cassini orbiter shows that Tethys appears to be peeking out from behind Rhea, watching the watcher. Scientists believe that Tethys' surprisingly high albedo is due to the water ice jets emerging from its neighbor, Enceladus.

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Nature is an artist, and this time she seems to have let her paints swirl together a bit. What the viewer might perceive to be Saturn's surface captured by NASA's Cassini orbiter is really just the tops of its uppermost cloud layers.
Nature is an artist, and this time she seems to have let her paints swirl together a bit. What the viewer might perceive to be Saturn's surface captured by NASA's Cassini orbiter is really just the tops of its uppermost cloud layers.

Mixing Paints

Nature is an artist, and this time she seems to have let her paints swirl together a bit. What the viewer might perceive to be Saturn's surface captured by NASA's Cassini orbiter is really just the tops of its uppermost cloud layers.

Target: S Rings
Mission: Cassini-Huygens
Spacecraft: Cassini Orbiter
Instrument: Imaging Science Subsystem - Narrow Angle
ID#: PIA18290
Added: 2014-11-17

Views: 1071

Mixing Paints

Nature is an artist, and this time she seems to have let her paints swirl together a bit. What the viewer might perceive to be Saturn's surface captured by NASA's Cassini orbiter is really just the tops of its uppermost cloud layers.

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The moons visible in this image from NASA's Cassini spacecraft, Pandora and Atlas, are quite small by astronomical standards, but the rings are also enormous. From one side of the planet to the other, the A ring stretches over 170,000 miles (270,000 km).
The moons visible in this image from NASA's Cassini spacecraft, Pandora and Atlas, are quite small by astronomical standards, but the rings are also enormous. From one side of the planet to the other, the A ring stretches over 170,000 miles (270,000 km).

Mini Moons

The moons visible in this image from NASA's Cassini spacecraft, Pandora and Atlas, are quite small by astronomical standards, but the rings are also enormous. From one side of the planet to the other, the A ring stretches over 170,000 miles (270,000 km).

Target: Tethys
Mission: Cassini-Huygens
Spacecraft: Cassini Orbiter
Instrument: Imaging Science Subsystem - Narrow Angle
ID#: PIA18279
Added: 2014-10-20

Views: 1308

Mini Moons

The moons visible in this image from NASA's Cassini spacecraft, Pandora and Atlas, are quite small by astronomical standards, but the rings are also enormous. From one side of the planet to the other, the A ring stretches over 170,000 miles (270,000 km).

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Like a drop of dew hanging on a leaf, Tethys appears to be stuck to the A and F rings from this perspective of NASA's Cassini spacecraft.
Like a drop of dew hanging on a leaf, Tethys appears to be stuck to the A and F rings from this perspective of NASA's Cassini spacecraft.

Stuck on the Rings

Like a drop of dew hanging on a leaf, Tethys appears to be stuck to the A and F rings from this perspective of NASA's Cassini spacecraft.

Target: Tethys
Mission: Cassini-Huygens
Spacecraft: Cassini Orbiter
Instrument: Imaging Science Subsystem - Narrow Angle
ID#: PIA18284
Added: 2014-10-13

Views: 4859

Stuck on the Rings

Like a drop of dew hanging on a leaf, Tethys appears to be stuck to the A and F rings from this perspective of NASA's Cassini spacecraft.

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NASA's Cassini spacecraft captures a rare family photo of three of Saturn's moons that couldn't be more different from each other. Shown here are Tethys (center), Hyperion (upper left), and Prometheus (lower left).
NASA's Cassini spacecraft captures a rare family photo of three of Saturn's moons that couldn't be more different from each other. Shown here are Tethys (center), Hyperion (upper left), and Prometheus (lower left).

The Odd Trio

NASA's Cassini spacecraft captures a rare family photo of three of Saturn's moons that couldn't be more different from each other. Shown here are Tethys (center), Hyperion (upper left), and Prometheus (lower left).

Target: Tethys
Mission: Cassini-Huygens
Spacecraft: Cassini Orbiter
Instrument: Imaging Science Subsystem - Narrow Angle
ID#: PIA18283
Added: 2014-09-22

Views: 1514

The Odd Trio

NASA's Cassini spacecraft captures a rare family photo of three of Saturn's moons that couldn't be more different from each other. Shown here are Tethys (center), Hyperion (upper left), and Prometheus (lower left).

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A thin sliver of Mimas, as seen by NASA's Cassini spacecraft, is illuminated, the long shadows showing off its many craters, indicators of the moon's violent history.
A thin sliver of Mimas, as seen by NASA's Cassini spacecraft, is illuminated, the long shadows showing off its many craters, indicators of the moon's violent history.

Crescent Mimas

A thin sliver of Mimas, as seen by NASA's Cassini spacecraft, is illuminated, the long shadows showing off its many craters, indicators of the moon's violent history.

Target: Mimas
Mission: Cassini-Huygens
Spacecraft: Cassini Orbiter
Instrument: Imaging Science Subsystem - Narrow Angle
ID#: PIA18285
Added: 2014-09-15

Views: 467

Crescent Mimas

A thin sliver of Mimas, as seen by NASA's Cassini spacecraft, is illuminated, the long shadows showing off its many craters, indicators of the moon's violent history.

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Saturn's innermost moon Pan orbits the giant planet seemingly alone in a ring gap its own gravity creates. This image was taken by NASA's Cassini spacecraft, this image.
Saturn's innermost moon Pan orbits the giant planet seemingly alone in a ring gap its own gravity creates. This image was taken by NASA's Cassini spacecraft, this image.

Pan Alone in the Gap

Saturn's innermost moon Pan orbits the giant planet seemingly alone in a ring gap its own gravity creates. This image was taken by NASA's Cassini spacecraft, this image.

Target: Pan
Mission: Cassini-Huygens
Spacecraft: Cassini Orbiter
Instrument: Imaging Science Subsystem - Narrow Angle
ID#: PIA18281
Added: 2014-09-08

Views: 562

Pan Alone in the Gap

Saturn's innermost moon Pan orbits the giant planet seemingly alone in a ring gap its own gravity creates. This image was taken by NASA's Cassini spacecraft, this image.

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