This graphic depicts the passage of asteroid 2014 DX110 past Earth on March 5, 2014. The asteroid's closest approach was at a distance equivalent to about nine-tenths of the distance between Earth and the moon.

This graphic depicts the passage of asteroid 2014 DX110 past Earth on March 5, 2014. The asteroid's closest approach was at a distance equivalent to about nine-tenths of the distance between Earth and the moon. Times indicated on the graphic are Universal Time. A time near closest approach, 2200 Universal Time, is 2 p.m. PST.

NASA detects, tracks and characterizes asteroids and comets using both ground- and space-based telescopes. The Near-Earth Object Observations Program, commonly called "Spaceguard," discovers these objects, characterizes a subset of them and identifies their close approaches to determine if any could be potentially hazardous to our planet.

NASA's Jet Propulsion Laboratory, Pasadena, Calif., manages the Near-Earth Object Program Office for NASA's Science Mission Directorate in Washington. JPL is a division of the California Institute of Technology in Pasadena.

More information about asteroids and near-Earth objects is at http://www.jpl.nasa.gov/asteroidwatch.

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