This image shows lava crumpled against the upstream side of an impact crater as seen by NASA's Mars Reconnaissance Orbiter.

This image shows lava crumpled against the upstream side of an impact crater. In places where we see smaller ridges in the lava, they have steep faces that retain less dust and look rocky. Because of the lesser amount of dust, we might be able to see better details of the topography.

The crater itself is extremely old, having long been filled in with dust and its rim severely eroded. Note also the flat surrounding terrain.

HiRISE is one of six instruments on NASA's Mars Reconnaissance Orbiter. The University of Arizona, Tucson, operates the orbiter's HiRISE camera, which was built by Ball Aerospace & Technologies Corp., Boulder, Colo. NASA's Jet Propulsion Laboratory, a division of the California Institute of Technology in Pasadena, manages the Mars Reconnaissance Orbiter Project for the NASA Science Mission Directorate, Washington.

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