The Boomerang nebula, called the 'coldest place in the universe,' reveals its true shape to the Atacama Large Millimeter/submillimeter Array (ALMA) telescope. The background blue structure, is seen in visible light by NASA's Hubble Space Telescope.
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Ghostly 'Boomerang'

The Boomerang nebula, called the "coldest place in the universe," reveals its true shape to the Atacama Large Millimeter/submillimeter Array (ALMA) telescope. The background blue structure, as seen in visible light by NASA's Hubble Space Telescope, shows a classic double-lobe shape with a very narrow central region. ALMA's resolution and ability to see the cold gas molecules reveals the nebula's more elongated shape, as seen in red.

ALMA, an international astronomy facility, is a partnership of Europe, North America and East Asia in cooperation with the Republic of Chile. ALMA construction and operations are led on behalf of Europe by European Southern Observatory, on behalf of North America by the National Radio Astronomy Observatory (NRAO), and on behalf of East Asia by the National Astronomical Observatory of Japan (NAOJ). The Joint ALMA Observatory (JAO) provides the unified leadership and management of the construction, commissioning and operation of ALMA.

The National Radio Astronomy Observatory is a facility of the National Science Foundation, operated under cooperative agreement by Associated Universities, Inc.

The California Institute of Technology in Pasadena manages JPL for NASA.

Image details

ID#:
PIA17551

Date added:
2013-10-25

Mission:
Hubble Space Telescope

Instruments:
Atacama Large Millimeter/submillimeter Array Telescope, Hubble Space Telescope

Rating:



Views:
7,072

Full-Res TIFF:
PIA17551.tif (9.32 MB)

Full-Res JPG:
PIA17551.jpg (0.38 MB)

Image credit:
NRAO/AUI/NSF/NASA/STScI/JPL-Caltech