Light-toned nodules and veins of a patch of sedimentary rock called 'Knorr' are visible in this image from NASA's Mars rover Curiosity.
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Veins and Nodules at 'Knorr' Target in 'Yellowknife Bay' of Gale Crater

Light-toned nodules and veins are visible in this image from NASA's Mars rover Curiosity of a patch of sedimentary rock called "Knorr." The target is in the "Yellowknife Bay" area of Gale Crater, close to where Curiosity found evidence of an ancient environment favorable for microbial life. The rover's Mast Camera (Mastcam) recorded this raw image during the 133rd Martian day, or sol, of Curiosity's work on Mars (Dec. 20, 2012). The width of the area shown in the image is about 10 inches (25 centimeters).

Curiosity's Mastcam was built and is operated by Malin Space Science Systems, San Diego.

NASA's Jet Propulsion Laboratory, Pasadena, Calif., manages the Mars Science Laboratory Project and the mission's Curiosity rover for NASA's Science Mission Directorate in Washington. The rover was designed and assembled at JPL, a division of the California Institute of Technology in Pasadena.

More information about Curiosity is online at http://www.nasa.gov/msl and http://mars.jpl.nasa.gov/msl/.

Image details

ID#:
PIA16792

Date added:
2013-03-18

Target:
Mars

Mission:
Mars Science Laboratory (MSL)

Spacecraft:
Curiosity

Instruments:
Mastcam

Rating:



Views:
2,243

Full-Res TIFF:
PIA16792.tif (2.81 MB)

Full-Res JPG:
PIA16792.jpg (0.12 MB)

Image credit:
NASA/JPL-Caltech/MSSS