This false color image of Triton is a composite of images taken through the violet, green and ultraviolet filters. The image was taken early on Aug. 25, 1989 when Voyager 2 was about 190,000 kilometers (118,000 miles) from Triton's surface.
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Triton

This false color image of Triton is a composite of images taken through the violet, green and ultraviolet filters. The image was taken early on Aug. 25, 1989 when Voyager 2 was about 190,000 kilometers (118,000 miles) from Triton's surface. The smallest visible features are about 4 kilometers (2.5 miles) across. The image shows a geologic boundary between completely dark materials and patchy light/dark materials. A layer of pinkish material stretches across the center of the image. The pinkish layer must be thin because underlying albedo patterns show through. Several features appear to be affected by the thin atmosphere; the elongated dark streaks may represent particulate materials blown in the same direction by prevailing winds, and the white material may be frost deposits. Other features appear to be volcanic deposits including the smooth, dark materials alongside the long, narrow canyons. The streaks themselves appear to originate from very small circular sources, some of which are white, like the source of the prominent streak near the center of the image. The sources may be small volcanic vents with fumarolic-like activity. The colors may be due to irradiated methane, which is pink to red, and nitrogen, which is white. The Voyager Mission is conducted by JPL for NASA's Office of Space Science and Applications.

Image details

ID#:
PIA02214

Date added:
1999-08-20

Target:
Triton

Mission:
Voyager

Spacecraft:
Voyager 2

Instruments:
Imaging Science Subsystem - Narrow Angle

Rating:



Views:
3,536

Full-Res TIFF:
PIA02214.tif (0.61 MB)

Full-Res JPG:
PIA02214.jpg (0.03 MB)

Image credit:
NASA/JPL