This image captured by NASA's Voyager 2 in 1986 revealed a continuous distribution of small particles throughout the Uranus ring system. This unique geometry, the highest phase angle at which Voyager imaged the rings, allowed us to see lanes of fine dust.
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Uranus Ring System

This dramatic Voyager 2 picture reveals a continuous distribution of small particles throughout the Uranus ring system Voyager took this image while in the shadow of Uranus, at a distance of 236,000 kilometers (142,000 miles and a resolution of about 33 km (20 ml). This unique geometry -- the highest phase angle at which Voyager imaged the rings -- allows us to see lanes of fine dust particles not visible from other viewing angles. All the previously known rings are visible here, however, some of the brightest features in the image are bright dust lanes not previously seen. The combination of this unique geometry and a long, 96 second exposure allowed this spectacular observation, acquired through the clear filter of Voyager's wide-angle camera. The long exposure produced a noticeable, non-uniform smear as well as streaks due to trailed stars. The Voyager project is managed for NASA by the Jet Propulsion Laboratory.

Image details

ID#:
PIA00142

Date added:
1996-01-29

Target:
U Rings

Mission:
Voyager

Spacecraft:
Voyager 2

Instruments:
Imaging Science Subsystem - Wide Angle

Rating:



Views:
4,058

Full-Res TIFF:
PIA00142.tif (0.15 MB)

Full-Res JPG:
PIA00142.jpg (0.17 MB)

Image credit:
NASA/JPL