This image of the Uranian moon, Miranda, was taken Jan 24, 1986 by NASA's Voyager 2. This image reveals a bewildering variety of fractures, grooves and craters, as well as features of different albedos (reflectancea).
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Miranda Fractures, Grooves and Craters

This Voyager 2 image of Miranda was taken Jan 24, 1986, from a distance of about 31,000 kilometers (19,000 miles), shortly before the spacecraft's closest approach to the Uranian moon. The high resolution of 600 meters (2,000 feet) reveals a bewildering variety of fractures, grooves and craters, as well as features of different albedos (reflectancea). This clear-filter, narrow-angle view encompasses areas of older, heavily cratered terrain with a wide variety of forms. The grooves and troughs reach depths of a few kilometers (or miles) and expose materials of different albedos. The great variety of directions of fractures and troughs, and the different densities of impact craters on them, signify a long, complex geologic evolution of this satellite. The Voyager project is managed for NASA by the Jet Propulsion Laboratory.

Image details

ID#:
PIA00140

Date added:
1996-01-29

Target:
Miranda

Mission:
Voyager

Spacecraft:
Voyager 2

Instruments:
Imaging Science Subsystem - Narrow Angle

Size:
789 x 768 pixels (width x height)

Rating:



Views:
4,233

Full-Res TIFF:
PIA00140.tif (0.27 MB)

Full-Res JPG:
PIA00140.jpg (0.1 MB)

Image credit:
NASA/JPL