This image of Miranda, Uranus' moon, was acquired by NASA's Voyager 2 on Jan. 24, 1986. Miranda displays a dramatically varied surface. Well shown are numerous ridges and valleys -- a topography that was probably produced by compressional tectonics.
This high-resolution image of Miranda was acquired by Voyager 2 on Jan. 24, 1986, when the spacecraft was 36,250 kilometers (22,500 miles) from the Uranian moon. In this clear-filter, narrow-angle image, Miranda displays a dramatically varied surface. Well shown at this resolution of 660 meters (2,160 feet) are numerous ridges and valleys -- a topography that was probably produced by compressional tectonics. Cutting across the ridges and valleys are many faults. The largest fault scarp, or cliff, is seen below and right of center; it shows grooves probably made by the contact of the fault blocks as they rubbed against each other (leaving what are known as slickensides). Movement of the down-dropped block is shown by the offset of the ridges. The fault may be 5 km (3 mi) high, or higher than the walls of the Grand Canyon on Earth. The Voyager project is managed for NASA by the Jet Propulsion Laboratory.
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