Jet Propulsion Laboratory Home Page
Jet Propulsion Laboratory Website National Aeronautics and Space Administration Website
JPL Home Page Earth Solar System Stars and Galaxies Technology Search
Images and Videos News Missions Events Kids Education Scientists and Engineers About JPL
Upper-left corner   Upper-right corner
  NEWS
Dot PRESS RELEASES

Dot PRESS KITS

Dot FACT SHEETS

Dot FEATURES

Dot PROFILES

Dot IMAGES / VIDEOS

Dot MEDIA VISITS

Dot MEDIA CONTACTS

Dot EMPLOYEE NEWSPAPER

 
2001 News Releases

Free Lectures will Explore Viking Legacy, Future Missions to Mars
July 13, 2001

Sunset at the Viking 1 landing site
Sunset at the Viking 1 landing site, August 1976
More on Mars Exploration

       A quarter of a century after successfully landing on Mars with twin spacecraft, NASA's Jet Propulsion Laboratory will treat the world to a trip down memory lane and a sneak-peek into the future with a pair of free lectures. The first lecture will also be broadcast over the Internet.

       Both lectures are open to the public and will start at 7 p.m. The first will be held at JPL on Thursday, July 19, and the other at Pasadena City College on Friday, July 20.

       Viking 1 and Viking 2, each comprised of an orbiter and a lander, unveiled a wealth of information about the red planet. While the orbiters mapped 97 percent of the surface, both landers carried out biology experiments designed to look for possible signs of life. The results gave scientists direct measurements of enigmatic chemical activity. However, they showed no clear evidence for the presence of living microorganisms in the soil near the landing sites.

       "The orbital and lander data sets collected by Viking serve as the foundation upon which the next era of Mars Exploration is based," said John Callas, science manager of the Mars Exploration Rover Project and the speaker for both lectures. "The Viking legacy has enabled NASA to engage in a very ambitious campaign of exploration."

       The lectures will discuss the Viking legacy, highlight recent discoveries by Mars Pathfinder and Mars Global Surveyor, and describe plans for future exploration. Launched in April, the 2001 Mars Odyssey will enter Mars' orbit in October. Two rovers equipped with sophisticated instruments will launch in 2003. The rovers will land in different regions of the red planet.

       Lecture seating is on a first-come, first-served basis. The lecture at JPL will be held in the von Karman Auditorium, 4800 Oak Grove Dr., in Pasadena, off the Oak Grove Drive exit of the 210 (Foothill) Freeway. For directions to JPL, see http://www.jpl.nasa.gov/about_JPL/directions.html. Information on the webcast is at http://www.jpl.nasa.gov/events/lectures/jul01.html .

       On Friday, the lecture will be held in Pasadena City College's Forum at 1570 E. Colorado Blvd. For more information, call (818) 354-0112.

       Find information on the von Karman lecture series at http://www.jpl.nasa.gov/events/lectures.html or call JPL's Public Services Office at (818) 354-0112.

       JPL is managed for NASA by the California Institute of Technology in Pasadena.


Contacts: Enrico Piazza (818) 354-0478

Bottom-left corner   Bottom-right corner  

Privacy / Copyright FAQ Feedback Site Map