Asteroid Will Safely Pass Closer Than Moon Wednesday

Asteroid 2014 DX110 Flyby of Earth on March 5, 2014 This graphic depicts the passage of asteroid 2014 DX110 past Earth on March 5, 2014. The asteroid's closest approach was at a distance equivalent to about nine-tenths of the distance between Earth and the moon. Times indicated on the graphic are Universal Time. A time near closest approach, 2200 Universal Time, is 2 p.m. PST. Image credit: NASA/JPL-Caltech
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March 04, 2014

As happens about 20 times a year with current detection capabilities, a known asteroid will safely pass Earth Wednesday closer than the distance from Earth to the moon.

This asteroid, 2014 DX110, is estimated to be about 100 feet (30 meters) across. Its closest approach to Earth will be at about 217,000 miles (about 350,000 kilometers) from Earth at about 1 p.m. PST (4 p.m. EST) on March 5. The average distance between Earth and its moon is about 239,000 miles (385,000 kilometers).

NASA detects, tracks and characterizes asteroids and comets using both ground- and space-based telescopes. The Near-Earth Object Observations Program, commonly called "Spaceguard," discovers these objects, characterizes a subset of them and identifies their close approaches to determine if any could be potentially hazardous to our planet.

NASA's Jet Propulsion Laboratory, Pasadena, Calif., manages the Near-Earth Object Program Office for NASA's Science Mission Directorate in Washington. JPL is a division of the California Institute of Technology in Pasadena.

More information about asteroids and near-Earth objects is at: http://www.jpl.nasa.gov/asteroidwatch.

Guy Webster 818-354-6278
Jet Propulsion Laboratory, Pasadena, Calif.
guy.webster@jpl.nasa.gov

Dwayne Brown 202-358-1726
NASA Headquarters, Washington
dwayne.c.brown@nasa.gov

2014-068



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