NASA Images of Hurricane Earl

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December 31, 1969

AIRS infrared image of Hurricane Earl Figure 1
AIRS infrared image of Hurricane Earl on Sept. 1, 2010, shows the temperature of Earl's cloud tops or the surface of Earth in cloud-free regions. The coldest cloud-top temperatures appear in purple, indicating towering cold clouds and heavy precipitation. Image credit: NASA/JPL-Caltech
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AIRS visible-light image of Hurricane Earl Figure 2
AIRS visible-light image of Hurricane Earl on Sept. 1, 2010. Image credit: NASA/JPL-Caltech
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Animation depicts a vertical cross-section of Hurricane Earl Figure 3
Animation depicts a vertical cross-section of Hurricane Earl as seen by NASA's CloudSat satellite on Aug. 31, 2010. CloudSat captured Earl's intense cumulonimbus clouds and eye, along with cloud-free regions. The storm's most intense convection and precipitation are shown in shades of orange and red. Image credit: NASA/JPL/The Cooperative Institute for Research in the Atmosphere (CIRA), Colorado State University/NOAA
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MISR image of Hurricane Earl Figure 4
MISR image of Hurricane Earl captured on Aug. 30, 2010. The left panel of the image extends about 1,110 kilometers (690 miles) in the north-south direction and 380 kilometers (236 miles) in the east-west direction. Earl's wind speeds are shown in the right panel. The lengths of the arrows indicate the wind speeds, and their orientation shows wind direction. The altitude of a given wind vector is shown in color. Image credit: NASA/GSFC/LaRC/JPL, MISR Team
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Hurricane Earl's wind speeds Figure 5
Hurricane Earl's wind speeds, as measured by a three-day composite of data from NASA's Jason-1 and Ocean Surface Topography Mission (OSTM)/Jason-2 satellites, from Aug. 29 to Sept. 1, 2010. Image credit: NASA/JPL Ocean Surface Topography Team
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Hurricane Earl's wave heights Figure 6
Hurricane Earl's wave heights, as measured by a three-day composite of data from NASA's Jason-1 and Ocean Surface Topography Mission (OSTM)/Jason-2 satellites, from Aug. 29 to Sept. 1, 2010. Image credit: NASA/JPL Ocean Surface Topography Team
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