skip navigation Follow this link to skip to the main content
Follow this link to skip to the main content
NASA Logo - Jet Propulsion Laboratory Follow this link to skip to the main content    + View the NASA Portal

JPL Home Earth Solar System Stars & Galaxies Technology
Jet Propulsion Laboratory
Images Multimedia News Missions Public Services Kids Education About JPL
Jet Propulsion Laboratory NASA Caltech Jet Propulsion Lab CalTech
Main
Video
podcast
Interactive
Webcast
Audio
Wallpaper



+ JPL online video catalog
+ JPL image use policy
+ NASA TV

+ Free QuickTime player
+ Free RealVideo player
+ Free Flash plug-in

Spitzer Media Telecon Apr. 5, 2006 -- Audio Clips

NASA's Spitzer Space Telescope has uncovered new evidence that planets might rise up out of a dead star's ashes. The telescope found a debris disk around a pulsar, the remnant of a star that blew up in a supernova explosion. The dusty rubble in this disk might ultimately stick together to form planets. This is the first time scientists have found planet-building materials around a dead star.

More information on the mission is at http://www.spitzer.caltech.edu .
+ Related podcast

CUT 1 – DR. DEEPTO CHAKRABARTY (chock-rah-BAR-tee) OF THE MASSACHUSETTS INSTITUTE OF TECHNOLOGY (MIT) SUMS UP THE LATEST DISCOVERY BY THE SPITZER SPACE TELESCOPE OF A DEBRIS DISK AROUND A PULSAR, A TYPE OF DEAD STAR.
Running time: :19
OUT: "LIKE A PULSAR"
+ Play audio
Transcript of CUT 1:
"We've discovered a dusty debris disk around a type of old, dead star called a pulsar. This disk looks remarkably like those also seen around ordinary young stars in which planets are known to form. So for the first time, we may be seeing the start of planet formation in the very different, harsh environment that exists around an old, dead star like a pulsar."

CUT 2– DR. DEEPTO CHAKRABARTY SAYS PULSARS ARE STRANGE, INCREDIBLY DENSE OBJECTS.
Running time: :14
OUT: "IN THE UNIVERSE"
+ Play audio
Transcript of CUT 2:
"A neutron star, a pulsar is about the mass of the sun squeezed into an object that's only 10 miles across. One teaspoon of a pulsar would weigh about two billion tons. It's the densest known material in the universe."

CUT 3– DR. CHARLES BEICHMAN, SPITZER SPACE TELESCOPE SCIENTIST AT NASA'S JET PROPULSION LABORATORY (JPL) AND CALTECH (THE CALIFORNIA INSTITUTE OF TECHNOLOGY), EXPLAINS WHY THIS DISCOVERY IS SO SIGNIFICANT.
Running time: :24
OUT: "HABITABLE PLANETS"
+ Play audio
Transcript of CUT 3:
"I think it's part of our overall search for planets that astronomers around the world are engaged in, both with ground-based telescopes and space-based telescopes. And it's part of this very exciting search for understanding our own human origins, are there other worlds out there, Are there other planets, Are there ultimately habitable planets?"

Privacy / Copyrights FAQ Contact JPL Sitemap
Link to www.usa.gov   View NASA Home Page
Site Manager:
Webmasters:
  Susan Watanabe
Tony Greicius, Martin Perez