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San Francisco Earthquake: 100 Years Later -- Audio Clips

On April 18, 1906, a massive earthquake and fire devastated the city of San Francisco. One hundred years later, scientists have made great strides in learning about quakes. Various agencies are involved, including NASA's Jet Propulsion Laboratory in Pasadena, Calif., which uses space technology to study quakes. For its studies, JPL is using computer modeling (simulating quakes in a computer), radar satellites, and a network of GPS receivers. More information on some of JPL's quake research is at: http://quakesim.jpl.nasa.gov

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CUT 1 – JPL GEOPHYSICIST MAGGI GLASSCOE IS WORKING ON USING COMPUTER SIMULATIONS TO RE-CREATE PAST EARTHQUAKES SO THEY CAN BE STUDIED.
Running time: :10
OUT: "LOS ANGELES BASIN"
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Description of CUT 1:
"This modeling project is specifically looking at the deformation associated with the 1906 earthquake, but we are also applying these computer models to look at different areas, including the Los Angeles basin."

CUT 2– JPL GEOPHYSICIST DR. ANDREA DONNELLAN SAYS EARTHQUAKE RESEARCHERS KNOW A LOT MORE THAN SCIENTISTS DURING THE TIME OF THE 1906 SAN FRANCISCO QUAKE. DONNELLAN WAS INTERVIEWED IN NORTHRIDGE, CALIF., NEAR A GPS RECEIVER THAT'S USED FOR JPL EARTHQUAKE STUDIES.
Running time: :28
OUT: "THINGS THAT OCCUR"
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Transcript of CUT 2:
"They didn't even really know the San Andreas fault existed, let alone all the neighboring faults in that earthquake. Since then we've been able to step back, use seismology to understand earthquakes better, map the faults better, and then we've added these space technologies, which really I think are going to revolutionize our understanding of earthquakes because we'll see all these movements we never saw before. Before we could measure the shaking from earthquakes. Now we'll be able to measure the strain in between the earthquakes as well, and all the quiet things that occur."


CUT 3– DR. ANDREA DONNELLAN WAS ASKED THE QUESTIONS ON EVERYONE'S MIND: CAN SCIENTISTS PREDICT EARTHQUAKES?
Running time: :27
OUT: "FOR THOSE AREAS"
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Transcript of CUT 3:
"We don't know how to predict earthquakes in the sense that we don't know how to say it's going to happen tomorrow but what we are doing is refining the hazard maps. So the outlook used to be 30 years, we'd say this entire region could have an earthquake that's going to do damage in the next 30 years. Now we're refining those down to 10 years and five years. And when you get those refined hazard estimates, that are also refined in space, so we know exactly where the damage may be, then you can really target your retrofitting for those areas."

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