CalTech NASA JPL JPL CalTech
NASA Logo - Jet Propulsion Laboratory Follow this link to skip to the main content
   + View the NASA Portal

JPL Home Earth Solar System Stars & Galaxies Technology
Mars Exploration Rovers
Images Multimedia News Missions Events Kids Education Science & Research About JPL
At a Glance
Daily Updates
Flight Director Reports
News Releases
Features
Image Releases
Multimedia
Fact Sheet
Press Kit
Media Contacts
Link to MER Home Page

 Popular Images:
 + Raw Images
 + Artist's Concept
 + Mars Wallpapers

 Image Archives:
 + May 2011
 + April 2011
 + March 2011
 + February 2011
 + January 2011
 + December 2010
 + November 2010
 + October 2010
 + September 2010
 + August 2010
 + July 2010
 + June 2010
 + May 2010
 + April 2010
 + March 2010
 + February 2010
 + January 2010
 + December 2009
 + November 2009
 + October 2009
 + September 2009
 + August 2009
 + July 2009
 + June 2009
 + May 2009
 + April 2009
 + March 2009
 + February 2009
 + January 2009
 + December 2008
 + November 2008
 + October 2008
 + September 2008
 + August 2008
 + July 2008
 + June 2008
 + May 2008
 + April 2008
 + March 2008
 + February 2008
 + January 2008
 + December 2007
 + November 2007
 + October 2007
 + September 2007
 + August 2007
 + July 2007
 + June 2007
 + May 2007
 + April 2007
 + March 2007
 + February 2007
 + January 2007
 + December 2006
 + November 2006
 + October 2006
 + September 2006
 + August 2006
 + July 2006
 + June 2006
 + May 2006
 + April 2006
 + March 2006
 + February 2006
 + January 2006
 + December 2005
 + November 2005
 + October 2005
 + September 2005
 + August 2005
 + July 2005
 + June 2005
 + May 2005
 + April 2005
 + March 2005
 + February 2005
 + January 2005
 + December 2004
 + November 2004
 + October 2004
 + September 2004
 + August 2004
 + July 2004
 + June 2004
 + May 2004
 + April 2004
 + March 2004
 + February 2004
 + January 2004
 + 2003
 + 2002

 Site Tools:
 + Adobe Reader
 + Apple QuickTime
 + Macromedia Flash
 + RealPlayer
Panorama or Mars

Full-Circle
1/9/09
This 360-degree panorama shows the vista from the location where NASA's Mars Exploration Rover Opportunity spent five weeks in November and December 2008 while the sun was nearly directly in between Mars and Earth, limiting communications.

Opportunity is approaching the fifth Earth-year anniversary of its landing on Mars, continuing a surface mission that was initially scheduled to last three months. The rover landed on Jan. 24, 2004 (Pacific Standard Time; Jan. 25, 2004 Universal Time). When it reached the location from which its panoramic camera (Pancam) captured this view, it had driven a total of 13,616 meters (8.46 miles) since its landing.

The view combines 276 different exposures taken with Opportunity's panoramic camera (Pancam) -- 92 pointings, with three filters at each pointing. The component images were taken during the period from the rover's 1,716th Martian day, or sol, to the mission's Sol 1719 (Nov. 21 to 24, 2008).

Opportunity has driven 1.83 kilometers (1.14 miles) since it exited Victoria Crater on Sol 1634 (Aug. 28, 2008). It skirted the west rim of Victoria and, at the point from which this panorama was taken, had reached a position about a kilometer (six-tenths of a mile) southwest of the south rim of the crater.

North is in the center of the panorama. Rover tracks are visible from the drive to the location from which the Pancam captured this view. For scale, the distance between the parallel wheel tracks is about one meter (3 feet).

Opportunity is on a 12-kilometer (7-mile) trek toward Endeavour crater [link from "Endeavor crater" to http://photojournal.jpl.nasa.gov/catalog/PIA11737], a crater more than 20 times the size of Victoria Crater, which Opportunity studied for about two years. On the way toward Endeavour the rover is pausing to examine selected loose rocks on the surface. At the location from which this panorama was taken, the rover used the spectrometers on its robotic arm to examine a cobble informally called "Santorini," a dark rock about 8 centimeters (3 inches) long, which the inspection indicates is probably a meteorite. The rock is too close to the rover to be visible in this panorama.

The lighter-toned patches of ground in this view are sulfate-rich bedrock. Darker patches are dark, windblown sand. The metal post in the foreground is the top of Opportunity's low-gain antenna.

Opportunity began driving again on Sol 1748 (Dec. 23, 2008).

This is an approximate true-color, red-green-blue composite panorama generated from images taken through the Pancam's 750-nanometer, 530-nanometer and 430-nanometer filters. This "natural color" view is the rover team's best estimate of what the scene would look like if we were there and able to see it with our own eyes.

Image Credit: NASA/JPL/Cornell University

+ Medium resolution version of this image
+ Print this image and caption
Privacy / Copyrights FAQ Contact JPL Sitemap
FIRST GOV + Freedom of Information Act NASA Home Page
Site Manager:
Webmasters:
  Susan Watanabe
Tony Greicius, Martin Perez