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Daily Update - 9/29/06
A View Worth Waiting For!
Opportunity Status for sol 947-953

Opportunity is healthy and sitting at the rim of "Victoria Crater"! After traveling 9,279.34 meters (5.77 miles) in 952 sols the team is rewarded by some of the most spectacular views seen on this mission. The week began with a checkout of basic mobility functions using the new flight software: arc, turn, go-to-waypoint and visual odometry. Also checked were a few of the mobility test criteria such as the time-of-day limits, suspension limits and a new capability for keep-out zones (areas deemed too dangerous to rove). Later in the week, Opportunity drove 60.1 meters (197 feet) over three sols to our current location at the top of "Duck Bay."

Sol-by-sol summaries:

Sol 947 (Sept. 22, 2006): Opportunity's panoramic camera took 13-filter, quarter-frame images of the targets "Macaroni" and "Rockhopper," and a mosaic of images of "Kitty Clyde's Sister." During the afternoon communication-relay pass by NASA's Mars Odyssey orbiter, the miniature thermal emission spectrometer was used to evaluate Macaroni and Rockhopper. The navigation camera checked for clouds and the panoramic camera assessed the clarity of the atmosphere with a tau measurement.

Sol 948: The morning of this sol, the rover monitored dust buildup and targeted the sky and ground with its miniature thermal emission spectrometer. Opportunity executed a series of mobility tests to check out the new version of its flight software. Post-drive imaging included 360-degree view by the navigation camera and an image mosaic by the panoramic camera.

Sol 949: In the morning of this sol, the panoramic camera imaged the sky and measured for atmospheric clarity. The navigation camera looked for clouds and the miniature thermal emission spectrometer did a sky and ground measurement. This sol contained un-targeted remote sensing because it was the third of a three-sol plan. The panoramic camera continued to be busy, taking another tau measurement and sky images. Before the Odyssey pass, the navigation camera took images of the sky (called "sky flats") for calibration purposes. During the Odyssey pass, Opportunity used its miniature thermal emission spectrometer.

Sol 950: Opportunity used part of the morning block of this sol to take a panoramic camera tau measurement and to look for clouds with its navigation camera. It also shot images of the sky with the panoramic camera and observed the sky and ground with its miniature thermal emission spectrometer. The rover completed another panoramic camera tau measurement before it drove 30.2 meters (99 feet) toward Victoria Crater's rim. Post-drive imaging included hazard avoidance camera imaging, a panoramic camera mosaic and a navigation camera 360-degree image.

Sol 951: This morning, Opportunity used its panoramic camera to survey the sky. The rover then took a panoramic camera tau measurement, drove 26.4 meters (87 feet) toward Duck Bay and completed post-drive imaging, including navigation and panoramic camera mosaics. The navigation camera looked for clouds and the panoramic camera imaged the sky.

Sol 952: Opportunity used its miniature thermal emission spectrometer to measure the sky and ground. The rover took pre-drive panoramic camera and navigation camera images. Opportunity drove 3.5 meters (11.5 feet) toward the rim's edge, then took a navigation camera mosaic. There was a post-drive navigation camera cloud observation before the rover shut down for the afternoon. Before the Odyssey pass, the panoramic camera made a tau measurement and the miniature thermal emission spectrometer measured the sky and ground during the orbiter's pass. The panoramic camera took a sunset tau measurement.

Sol 953 (Sept. 29, 2006): In the morning of this sol, the panoramic camera imaged the sky, the navigation camera looked for clouds and the miniature thermal emission spectrometer measured the sky and ground. This sol is the first of two sols of targeted remote sensing in Duck Bay before Opportunity will drive off to "Cape Verde." The rover is at its closest approach to Victoria Crater and it has an incredible view! The plan for the remainder of this sol is to: take a panoramic camera tau measurement, look for clouds with the navigation camera, take a navigation camera mosaic in the drive direction, and take part one of a large panoramic camera panorama. The miniature thermal emission spectrometer will take a vertical scan of "Cabo Frio" during the Odyssey pass. The plan also calls for another navigation camera scan for clouds and a panoramic camera 13-filter examination of Cabo Frio to support the miniature thermal emission spectrometer in the morning of sol 954.

As of sol 952 (Sept. 27, 2006), Opportunity's total odometry is 9,279.34 meters (5.77 miles).

Daily Update - 9/29/06
Solar Power Is on the Rise as Spirit 'Follows the Water'
Spirit Status for sol 970-976

Solar power levels on Spirit are slowly beginning to rise again following a winter low of 275 watt-hours on Martian day, or sol, 933 (Aug. 18, 2006). One hundred watt-hours is the amount of electricity needed to light one 100-watt bulb for one hour. This week, the rover's power levels rose to about 296 watt-hours.

Spirit spent much of the week analyzing atmospheric dust attracted to magnets on the spacecraft. The rover identifies iron minerals in the dust using the Moessbauer spectrometer. One of the two magnets, the filter magnet, is weaker than the capture magnet, allowing scientists to separate mineral grains that have the highest magnetic susceptibility, particularly minerals that contain iron.

During the week, Spirit studied rock targets known as "Juan Carlos," "Gueslaga," and "Tor" using the miniature thermal emission spectrometer. Juan Carlos and Tor are vesicular rocks filled with tiny holes that formed during the cooling of a froth of magma and gas. Scientists hope to determine whether these rocks are similar to or different from nearby smooth-textured volcanic rocks known as basalts. Gueslaga, meanwhile, is an entirely different kind of rock known as an "exotic," meaning it came from somewhere else and may have been emplaced during an impact event.

Spirit continued to make scientific observations of the soil target known as "Tyrone." Tyrone is a patch of bright material, white and yellow in color, that is possibly analogous to salty soils examined earlier in the mission known as "Arad" and "Paso Robles." Spirit's dragging right front wheel churned up the bright material on the rover's 784th sol of exploration of Mars (March 18, 2006). Some science team members have speculated that some component in this material is hydrated. If moisture enters or leaves the material, the miniature thermal emission spectrometer would be able to detect it. Scientists are also monitoring the soil with the rover's panoramic camera for any color changes, because variability in water content could affect the color. These observations are ongoing to account for seasonal variability.

The rover continues to operate successfully with the new flight software package.

Sol-by-sol summaries

Sol 970 (Sept. 25, 2006): Spirit measured atmospheric opacity using the panoramic camera, surveyed the sky and ground with the miniature thermal emission spectrometer, analyzed dust on the filter magnet with the Moessbauer spectrometer, acquired morning images of the spacecraft deck with the panoramic camera, and scanned the sky for clouds with the navigation camera.

Sol 971: Spirit measured atmospheric opacity using the panoramic camera, surveyed the sky and ground with the miniature thermal emission spectrometer, collected data from the rock target known as Juan Carlos, and surveyed the horizon using the panoramic camera.

Sol 972: Spirit measured atmospheric opacity using the panoramic camera, surveyed the sky and ground with the miniature thermal emission spectrometer, restarted integration of data from the filter magnets with the Moessbauer spectrometer, acquired panoramic camera images of the work volume accessible by the robotic arm, and measured morning sky brightness in the west with the panoramic camera.

Sol 973: Spirit measured atmospheric opacity using the panoramic camera, surveyed the sky and ground with the miniature thermal emission spectrometer, studied the rock targets Gueslaga and Tor using the miniature thermal emission spectrometer, and used the panoramic camera to take images of rover tracks and measure morning sky brightness in the west.

Sol 974: Plans called for Spirit to measure atmospheric opacity using the panoramic camera, survey the sky and ground with the miniature thermal emission spectrometer, restart integration of data from the filter magnets with the Moessbauer spectrometer, survey the sky and ground with the miniature thermal emission spectrometer, scan the sky for clouds, measure morning sky brightness, and take a morning measurement of dust on the panoramic camera mast assembly with the miniature thermal emission spectrometer.

Sol 975: Plans called for Spirit to measure atmospheric opacity using the panoramic camera, survey the sky and ground with the miniature thermal emission spectrometer, and acquire morning images of the rover's tracks with all 13 filters of the panoramic camera.

Sol 976 (Oct. 1, 2006): Plans called for Spirit to measure atmospheric opacity using the panoramic camera, survey the sky and ground using the miniature thermal emission spectrometer, continue analysis of dust on the filter magnets with the Moessbauer spectrometer, and complete a morning sky survey with the panoramic camera.

Odometry

As of sol 973 (Sept. 28, 2006), Spirit's total odometry remained at 6,876.18 meters (4.27 miles).



Daily Update - 9/23/06
Nearly There!
Opportunity Status for sol 941-946

Opportunity is healthy and very near "Victoria Crater." The rover spent its week completing an alpha particle X-ray spectrometer observation of rock target "Cape Faraday," successfully booting its new flight software and exercising its mobility functions.

Opportunity is currently a little over 45 meters (148 feet) away from Victoria Crater's "Duck Bay" – a point on Victoria's vast rim. Once the team has verified that the new onboard flight software is stable, Opportunity will drive out to Duck Bay. This location is expected to provide Opportunity a spectacular view of the crater's interior.

Sol-by-sol summaries:

Sol 941 (Sept. 16, 2006): In the morning, the panoramic camera imaged areas of the sky and looked for clouds. The miniature thermal emission spectrometer observed the sky and ground. Opportunity completed several panoramic camera assessments of the clarity of the atmosphere. The panoramic camera also surveyed the ground and imaged the soil target "Dellinbaugh," within the crater dubbed "Emma Dean." Parameters for the robotic arm were tested with the new flight software. The alpha particle X-ray spectrometer completed an observation of Cape Faraday.

Sol 942: This morning, the rover's panoramic camera imaged parts of the Martian sky and the miniature thermal emission spectrometer collected data from the sky and ground. Opportunity assessed the clarity of the atmosphere with a panoramic camera "tau" measurement. That camera also imaged the rover magnets to monitor dust and had a look at the horizon. The miniature thermal emission spectrometer completed a sky and ground observation and checked its calibration target. Before the communications pass with NASA's Mars Odyssey orbiter, the rover completed another tau measurement. During the pass, the miniature thermal emission spectrometer was used.

Sol 943: Opportunity drove about 35 meters (115 feet), paused and took a mid-drive navigation camera mosaic of the crater dubbed "Kitty Clyde's Sister." The rover then drove another 25 meters (82 feet) and took images with the hazard avoidance cameras. After the drive, the navigation camera and panoramic camera took images from the rover's new location. The panoramic camera was also used this sol to image parts of the sky and the miniature thermal emission spectrometer took measurements of the sky and ground.

Sol 944: This sol was dedicated to booting flight software and ensuring that imaging and data-product parameters were functioning properly with the new software.

Sol 945: This sol was used to update mobility parameters for the new flight software. Some remote sensing science was completed.

Sol 946 (Sept. 21, 2006): The rover performed remote sensing science.

As of sol 943 (Sept. 18, 2006) Opportunity's odometry total is 9,192.05 meters (5.71 miles).

Daily Update - 9/22/06
Spirit Activates New Software
Spirit Status for sol 964-969

Following some dramatic scrambling by rover handlers to command both Mars Exploration Rovers to switch to new flight software during a bit of a traffic jam at the Red Planet, Spirit successfully woke up and began operating with the new software. The X-band frequency for communicating directly with Earth had become unavailable while being used by NASA's Mars Reconnaissance Orbiter during critical events for that mission. As in the past, engineers were able to use the UHF-band frequency to relay commands indirectly to the rovers via NASA's Mars Odyssey orbiter. Time was of the essence in order to begin running and testing the new software before solar conjunction in October, when Mars will be on the opposite side of the sun from Earth and radio communication will be intermittent for a couple of weeks.

The new software gives the rover enhanced autonomous operational capabilities to be tested in coming months.

Sol-by-sol summary

Sol 964 (Sept. 19, 2006): Spirit halted operations temporarily while awaiting instructions from Earth. Rover handlers originally planned to have the rover reboot using the new flight software by sending a command over the X-band uplink. The X-band became unavailable when it was needed by the Mars Reconnaissance Orbiter. The team sent the reboot command via the UHF-band antenna on the Odyssey orbiter later the same day.

Sol 965: At 11 a.m. local solar time on Mars, Spirit woke up for the first time running the new flight software, known as version R9.2. Later the same sol, or Martian day, Spirit ran a series of engineering sequences to establish operating parameters for data products and imaging.

Sol 966: Spirit set operating parameters for driving and operating the rover's robotic arm. The rover measured atmospheric dust using the panoramic camera.

Sol 967: Plans called for Spirit to continue to test the new software. Science activities remained light as the uplink team waited for both Spirit and Spirit's twin, Opportunity, on the other side of Mars, to reboot using the new software.

Sol 968: Plans called for Spirit to return to relatively normal science operations without moving the robotic arm, while team members awaited confirmation that the rover had established the correct operating parameters for the arm. Spirit was to complete 5 hours of analysis of dust on the rover's capture magnet using the alpha particle X-ray spectrometer.

Sol 969 (Sept. 24, 2006): Plans called for Spirit to measure surface reflectivity with the panoramic camera, measure atmospheric dust, and complete a morning scan of the sky and ground with the miniature thermal emission spectrometer, followed by similar observations in the afternoon. Spirit was also instructed to measure sky brightness, check for changes over time in the panoramic camera, and study a soil target known as "Tyrone" with the miniature thermal emission spectrometer.

Odometry

As of sol 965 (Sept. 20, 2006), Spirit's total odometry remained at 6,876.18 meters (4.27 miles).



Daily Update - 9/15/06
Grinding into 'Cape Faraday'
Opportunity Status for sol 936-940

Opportunity is healthy and is currently driving toward "Victoria Crater," which is a little over 100 meters (328 feet) away. On sol 936 (Sept. 11, 2006), a short bump was made to a robotic arm rock target called "Cape Faraday" near the crater "Emma Dean." Opportunity drove 1.45 meters (4.8 feet) between sols 936-940.

Sol-by-sol summaries:

Sol 936 (Sept. 11, 2006): The morning of this sol saw the rover monitoring the amount of dust on itself using the panoramic mast assembly. Opportunity completed a panoramic camera tau, assessing the clarity of the sky. The rover then bumped to the robotic arm target at Emma Dean Crater and took a panoramic camera image of the arm's work area. Another measurement was done before the Mars Odyssey pass. During the pass, Opportunity used the miniature thermal emission spectrometer and had a look at that instrument's calibration target.

Sol 937: Opportunity used the morning to examine certain points in the sky with its panoramic camera and miniature thermal emission spectrometer. The miniature thermal emission spectrometer took measurements of the sky and ground, and the instrument's calibration targets were examined.

Sol 938: Opportunity completed another assessment of the clarity of the sky. The rover used its miniature thermal emission spectrometer to measure points on the sky and ground and used its navigation camera to search for clouds. The rover's miniature thermal emission spectrometer had a look at targets "Thompson" and "Jones."

Sol 939: The rover did another assessment of the sky, a tau measurement. The rover used its microscopic imager to snap a photo of Cape Faraday before grinding. The rock abrasion tool ground into the target and the microscopic imager took the "after" shot. The panoramic camera took images in the rover's driving direction. The alpha particle X-ray spectrometer was used after the Odyssey pass.

Sol 940 (Sept. 15, 2005): On this morning, Opportunity used its panoramic camera to examine targets in the sky and used the miniature thermal emission spectrometer to look at the sky and ground. The rover examined Cape Faraday with the Moessbauer spectrometer, and took a look at the rock "Beaman" with the miniature thermal emission spectrometer. During the Odyssey pass, the rover investigated the miniature thermal emission spectrometer calibration target.

As of sol 936, (Sept. 11, 2006) Opportunity's total odometry was 9130.29 meters (5.67 miles)

Daily Update - 9/14/06
The Martian Sun Also Rises as Winter Retreats
Spirit Status for sol 950-956

Spirit is beginning to see an upward trend in electrical power as winter slowly recedes and the sun ascends higher in the sky each day. Electrical power from the rover’s solar array rose to 287 watt-hours on the rover’s 958th Martian day, or sol (Sept. 12, 2006) of exploration, compared with 277 watt-hours on sol 944 (Aug. 29, 2006). One hundred watt-hours is the amount of electricity needed to light one 100-watt bulb for one hour.

During the past week, Spirit conducted 10 hours of analysis of the elemental composition of dust on the rover’s magnets using the alpha particle X-ray spectrometer. Spirit also finished taking images of the spacecraft deck.

Sol-by-sol summary

Sol 957 (Sept. 11, 2006): Spirit continues to complete the same set of observations each sol in parallel with engineering activities such as data management. The engineering block of activities includes monitoring atmospheric dust with the panoramic camera, and surveying the sky and ground with the miniature thermal emission spectrometer. On this particular sol, Spirit demonstrated additional multi-tasking abilities by acquiring data on a rock target known as "Vostok" using the miniature thermal emission spectrometer while transmitting data to the Odyssey spacecraft as it passed overhead.

Sol 958: Spirit acquired part 13 of the 15-part image mosaic of the spacecraft deck with the panoramic camera. Spirit spent about five hours acquiring data on the elemental composition of dust on the rover’s filter magnets using the alpha particle X-ray spectrometer.

Sol 959: Spirit acquired panoramic camera images of a soil target consisting of bright material in the rover’s tracks known as "Tyrone."

Sol 960: Plans called for Spirit to continue to acquire panoramic images of the rover deck, restart the alpha particle X-ray spectrometer following the overhead pass of the Odyssey spacecraft, and spend 4 hours and 50 minutes collecting elemental data of dust on the filter magnets. Plans also called for a morning measurement of sky brightness in the west with the panoramic camera (known as a pancam skyspot), a search for clouds using the navigation camera, a horizon survey with the panoramic camera, imaging of the "El Dorado" dune field with the panoramic camera, and imaging of ripples with the rear hazard avoidance camera.

Sol 961: Plans called for Spirit to acquire data from a target known as "Macquarie" with the miniature thermal emission spectrometer, acquire data from the calibration target with the miniature thermal emission spectrometer, and search for clouds with the navigation camera.

Sol 962: Plans called for Spirit to acquire the last segment of the 15-part panoramic mosaic of the spacecraft deck and conduct a 4-hour and 35-minute alpha particle X-ray spectrometer analysis of the filter magnets. Plans also called for Spirit to acquire sky images with the panoramic camera and validate measurements of complete darkness by the panoramic camera.

Sol 963 (Sept. 18, 2006): Plans called for Spirit to acquire images of the rover’s tracks with the navigation camera, take microscopic images of the filter and capture magnets, and place the alpha particle X-ray spectrometer on the capture magnet. Plans also called for the rover to acquire hazard avoidance camera images of the work volume reached by the rover’s robotic arm, monitor dust on the panoramic camera mast assembly, survey the horizon with the panoramic camera, and search for morning clouds with the navigation camera.

Odometry

As of sol 958 (Sept. 12, 2006), Spirit’s total odometry remained at 6,876.18 meters (4.27 miles).

Daily Update - 9/12/06
Finishing Up Scuff Work and Heading for 'Emma Dean'
Opportunity Status for sol 928-935

Opportunity is healthy and just over 100 meters (328 feet) from "Victoria Crater." The rover completed robotic arm work on a scuff mark it made on sol 919. On sol 929 (Sept. 4, 2006), Opportunity almost got a hole-in-one by driving 100.31 meters (329 feet) to the small crater "Emma Dean." The rover arrived just 5 meters (16 feet) short of Emma Dean. On sol 931 the rover photographed the bit of the rock abrasion tool (RAT) to help engineers estimate how many more grinds might be possible with the tool. The hazard avoidance camera took several high-resolution images at different angles. The RAT engineers are examining them to see how much "bite" is left in the RAT. Also on sol 931, a short bump to an ejecta rock was attempted in the hopes of grinding it. Another bump (tentatively scheduled for sol 937) will have to be attempted before the rover can actually grind it. The remainder of the week had Opportunity acquiring remote-sensing science at Emma Dean.

Following the robotic arm campaign at Emma Dean, Opportunity will continue its drive to Victoria Crater.

Sol-by-sol summaries:

Sol 928 (Sept. 3, 2006): Opportunity used the microscopic imager on the robotic arm to look at scuff-mark targets "Powell" and "Powell's Brother." The rover also used the alpha particle X-ray spectrometer on Powell's Brother. The miniature thermal emission spectrometer was also used on this sol.

Sol 929: The rover bumped back this sol and used its panoramic camera. It also drove forward toward the small crater referred to as Emma Dean. The rover also took some post-drive images.

Sol 930: This sol consisted of untargeted remote sensing.

Sol 931: Opportunity bumped to a rover arm target at Emma Dean and conducted untargeted remote sensing.

Sol 932: The rover conducted untargeted remote sensing.

Sol 933: Opportunity conducted targeted remote sensing.

Sol 934: Opportunity conducted targeted remote sensing.

Sol 935 (Sept. 10, 2006): Opportunity conducted targeted remote sensing.

As of sol 931 (Sept. 6, 2006), Opportunity's total odometry was 9,128.84 meters (5.67 miles).

Daily Update - 9/5/06
Spirit Recovers from Software Reset, Makes Finishing Touches to Winter Panorama
Spirit Status for sol 943-949

Spirit experienced a software reset during the evening overpass of the Odyssey orbiter on sol 944 (Aug. 29, 2006). The rover was in the process of receiving command sequences for the following two Martian days, sols 945 and 946 (Aug. 30-31, 2006). As a result of the reset, the rover went into automode, meaning the rover did not attempt to execute a master sequence of activities for the day. The apparent cause was that the rover's central processing unit was overworked as several tasks were running in parallel at the time. Engineers transmitted a new, abbreviated plan of activities on sol 946 along with the plan of activities for sol 947 (Sept. 1, 2006).

Spirit is healthy and continues to make progress on the rover's winter science campaign. The rover spent part of the week filling in sections of the rover deck for the "McMurdo panorama." Electrical power from the rover's solar array has been holding steady at about 280 watt-hours per sol (a hundred watt-hours is the amount of electricity needed to light one 100-watt bulb for one hour).

Sol-by-sol summaries

Sol 943 (Aug. 28, 2006): Spirit acquired sky images with the navigation camera. The rover scanned the atmosphere for opacity caused by dust and scanned the sky and ground with the miniature thermal emission spectrometer.

Sol 944: Spirit acquired microscopic images of the soil target known as "Halley Brunt." Spirit scanned the atmosphere for opacity caused by dust and scanned the sky and ground with the miniature thermal emission spectrometer.

Sol 945: Spirit experienced a software reset and went into automode, meaning the rover did not attempt to execute a master sequence of activities for the day. The apparent cause was that the rover's central processing unit was overworked.

Sol 946: Spirit remained in automode. Engineers transmitted an abbreviated plan of activities for the sol along with the plan of activities for sol 947.

Sol 947: Plans called for Spirit to acquire fill-in images for the McMurdo panorama and to continue to make daily observations of the sky and ground with the panoramic camera and the miniature thermal emission spectrometer.

Sol 948: Plans called for Spirit to acquire Moessbauer data on the soil target called "Halley Brunt" and to continue to make daily observations of the sky and ground with the panoramic camera and the miniature thermal emission spectrometer.

Sol 949 (Sept. 3, 2006): Plans called for the rover to acquire fill-in frames for the McMurdo panorama and to continue to make daily observations of the sky and ground with the panoramic camera and the miniature thermal emission spectrometer.

Odometry

As of sol 945 (Aug. 30, 2006), Spirit's total odometry remained at 6,876.18 meters (4.27 miles).

Daily Update - 9/1/06
Inching Closer to 'Victoria'
Opportunity Status for sol 920-927

Opportunity is healthy and still 218 meters (715 feet) from "Victoria Crater." Over the weekend, the rover’s shoulder azimuth joint stalled as Opportunity was trying to start measurements on a trench it dug on Sol 919 (Aug. 25, 2006). Consequently, all weekend arm activities were aborted, but remote science activities were executed as planned.

Beginning on Sol 923, rover arm diagnostic measurements were taken as well as some remote sensing science. Results from the diagnostics revealed neither cause nor any damage to the stalled joint. On Sol 924, the arm performed flawlessly as Opportunity successfully completed the activities originally planned for Sol 920. On Sols 925, 926 and 927 Opportunity collected more arm diagnostics (to ensure the stow before drive would go smoothly) as well as completing all arm activities originally planned over the weekend.

Sol-by-sol summaries:

Sol 920 (Aug. 26, 2006): Opportunity did a miniature thermal emission spectrometer observation and other activities were aborted due to the arm stall.

Sol 921: The rover took a panoramic camera image.

Sol 922: Opportunity used its panoramic camera and miniature thermal emission spectrometer.

Sol 923: The rover conducted arm diagnostics and took panoramic camera and miniature thermal emission spectrometer observations.

Sol 924: Completing the activities originally planned for sol 920, Opportunity took a microscopic image and did an alpha particle X-ray spectrometer observation.

Sol 925: The rover continued to do arm diagnostics and completed a Moessbauer spectrometer observation – a completion of sol 921’s originally planned activities.

Sol 926: Opportunity continued to do arm diagnostics and completed activities originally planned for sol 922 by taking microscopic images and using the Moessbauer spectrometer.

Sol 927: On this sol, the rover used its Moessbauer spectrometer.

As of sol 925 (August 31, 2006), Opportunity’s total odometry was 9,023.70 meters (5.61 miles).

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