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Daily Update - 5/31/07
Remarkable Rover Continues to Astonish
Spirit Status for sol 1200-1206

Spirit is still making new discoveries despite dragging its feet, so to speak, after losing use of the right front wheel 426 sols, or Martian days, ago. In the process of creating small trenches while traversing Martian terrain, the dragging right front wheel revealed one of the most astonishing discoveries so far -- exceptionally high silica content in Martian soil, indicative of water at some point in the past. Two of Spirit's scientific instruments -- the alpha-particle X-ray spectrometer and the miniature thermal emission spectrometer -- measured a composition of about 90 percent pure silica in a soil target known as "Gertrude Weise."

Sol-by-sol summary

In addition to daily observations of atmospheric dust levels using the panoramic camera and surveys of the sky and ground using the miniature thermal emission spectrometer, Spirit completed the following activities:

Sol 1200 (May 19, 2007): Spirit started a 23.25-hour study with the Mössbauer spectrometer and surveyed the rover's tracks as well as targets known as "Josephine Kabick," "Nalda Phillips1," "Nalda Phillips2," "Marilyn Olinger," and "Eileen Burmeister" with the miniature thermal emission spectrometer.

Sol 1201: Spirit watched for morning dust devils, stowed the robotic arm, and bumped backward in 60-centimeter (24-inch) "steps," or intervals. After each step, Spirit scuffed the soil with the left front wheel by rotating the wheel 180 degrees. The rover did this for a distance of 4.19 meters (13.8 feet). After the drive, Spirit acquired images of the scuffed terrain and the terrain ahead with the navigation camera.

Sol 1202: Spirit completed a survey at high sun using the panoramic camera. Spirit acquired panoramic camera images of the scuffed area and surveyed Gertrude Weise with the miniature thermal emission spectrometer. The rover searched for dust devils by acquiring navigation camera movies in coordination with overhead observations by the High Resolution Science Imaging Experiment on board the Mars Reconnaissance Orbiter.

Sol 1203: Spirit monitored dust on the rover mast and watched for dust devils in the morning. Spirit acquired navigation camera images before driving 6.68 meters (21.9 feet) around obstacles en route to "Home Plate." After the drive, Spirit acquired images with the hazard avoidance cameras and navigation camera.

Sol 1204: Spirit spent the first part of the sol analyzing the rover's external calibration target with the miniature thermal emission spectrometer, searching for clouds with the navigation camera, and acquiring movies in search of dust devils with the navigation camera. The rover then acquired image mosaics of the dune field known as "El Dorado" with the panoramic camera in addition to systematic foreground data with the miniature thermal emission spectrometer. Spirit acquired navigation camera images, searched again for dust devils, and acquired more panoramic camera images.

Sol 1205: Spirit completed a systematic ground survey with the panoramic camera, unstowed the robotic arm, brushed the surface of a target known as "Pesapallo," acquired stereo microscopic images of the surface, then placed the alpha-particle X-ray spectrometer on it. Spirit acquired data with the alpha-particle X-ray spectrometer for 18.75 hours.

Sol 1206 (May 25, 2007): Spirit searched for morning dust devils, retracted the robotic arm, and placed the Mössbauer spectrometer on Pesapallo. The rover acquired Mössbauer spectrometer data for 23 hours. Spirit acquired panoramic camera images of a target known as "Bullpen" and miniature thermal emission spectrometer data from a target known as "Joyce Steel." The following morning, Spirit was scheduled to conduct a survey of the horizon with the panoramic camera in addition to studies with the miniature thermal emission spectrometer.

Odometry

As of sol 1204 (May 23, 2007), Spirit's total odometry was 7,120.34 meters (4.42 miles).

Daily Update - 5/28/07
Opportunity Turns Up the Amps
Opportunity Status for sol 1164-1170

Opportunity's electrical supply returned to levels not seen since the rover first arrived on Mars. Peak electrical current from the rover's solar arrays climbed above 4.0 amps and remained there for most of the week as a result of three recent dust-cleaning events. The last time electrical current reached similar levels was on sol 18 (Feb. 10, 2004)!

Meanwhile, Opportunity is healthy and continues to circumnavigate "Victoria Crater" back toward "Duck Bay." On the rover's 1,163rd sol, or Martian day of exploration (May 2, 2007), Opportunity drove 90 meters (296 feet). The following sol the rover drove toward the rim of "Cape of Good Hope" to acquire high-quality, super-resolution images of the western face of "Cape St. Vincent." These images will enable scientists to better characterize detailed cross-bedding in the lower stratigraphic unit.

Opportunity also successfully tested a new procedure for using the rock abrasion tool to grind and seek a surface of scientific interest. At a rock target known as "Viva La Rata" ("Long Live the Rat"), the rover used software to bypass a check that was causing the grind encoder to fail. Because the RAT can no longer find the rock surface by seek/scan, the rover used the grinding motion to do a "grind/scan." On sol 1166 (May 4, 2007), Opportunity performed a successful grind/scan to find the target surface. Then, on sol 1168 (May 7, 2007), the rover used the rock abrasion tool to brush Viva la Ratta.

On sol 1169 (May 8, 2007), Opportunity postponed a planned drive to study some cobbles because of a joint 1 stall that occurred while stowing the robotic arm before the drive. This stall was similar to previous joint 1 stalls. On sol 1170 (May 9, 2007), Opportunity reached its destination, an outcrop known as "Madrid/Guadarrama."

Sol-by-sol summary

In addition to daily observations that included measuring atmospheric dust with the panoramic camera and surveying the sky and ground with the miniature thermal emission spectrometer, Opportunity completed the following activities:

Sol 1164 (May 3, 2007): Opportunity stowed the robotic arm, drove approximately 15 meters (49 feet) onto "Cape of Good Hope," acquired hazard avoidance camera images just before and after the end of the drive, and unstowed the robotic arm. The rover acquired a 3-by-1 mosaic of "Cape of Good Hope" as well as other images of the terrain with the navigation camera after the drive.

Sol 1165: Opportunity began the sol by acquiring a timed movie in search of clouds, with successive images taken after a two-minute delay. The rover completed a sky survey at high sun using the panoramic camera and measured dark current (signals received when not exposed to light) while both hot and warm. The rover enjoyed a deep sleep.

Sol 1166: Upon awakening, Opportunity surveyed the sky with the panoramic camera and acquired panoramic camera images of Cape St. Vincent. While acquiring stereo microscopic images of Viva la Rata prior to grinding the rock surface, Joint 1 stalled. The rover conducted a touch test on Viva La Rata with the rock abrasion tool and searched for clouds with the navigation camera.

Sol 1167: In the morning, Opportunity monitored dust on the rover mast and acquired thumbnail images of the sky with the panoramic camera. The rover acquired super-resolution images of Cape St. Vincent with the panoramic camera and searched for clouds with the navigation camera.

Sol 1168: Opportunity completed a morning survey of the horizon with the panoramic camera and brushed Viva La Rata with the rock abrasion tool. Following that, the rover acquired stereo microscopic images of the brushed surface and studied it with the alpha-particle X-ray spectrometer. Opportunity also surveyed a target known as "Rodrigues" with the miniature thermal emission spectrometer and acquired panoramic camera images of the terrain ahead. Opportunity scanned the sky for clouds with the navigation camera.

Sol 1169: Opportunity acquired sky images with the panoramic camera and checked for drift (changes with time) in the miniature thermal emission spectrometer. The rover did not stow the robotic arm as planned after having moved it into ready position because of the Joint 1 stall. Also as a result of the stall, the rover did not drive backward to adjust its position and proceed to "Madrid" as planned. Opportunity acquired images of Viva La Rata with the panoramic camera and post-drive images with both the panoramic and navigation cameras. The rover searched for clouds with the navigation camera.

Sol 1170 (May 8, 2007): Opportunity acquired post-drive images with the navigation camera, conducted a diagnostic test of the robotic arm, stowed the robotic arm, acquired panoramic camera images of "Madrid," unstowed the robotic arm, and acquired images with the navigation and panoramic cameras. The rover scanned the sky for clouds and conducted a survey of rock clasts with the panoramic camera.

Odometry

As of sol 1170 (May 8, 2007), Opportunity's total odometry was 10,784.94 meters (6.7 miles).

Daily Update - 5/24/07
Spirit Continues Soil Analysis
Spirit Status for sol 1192-1193

Spirit is healthy and spent the last week studying light and dark soil in and around the rover's tracks between "Home Plate" and "Mitcheltree Ridge." Spirit collected additional soil data, including about 24 hours of data using the alpha-particle X-ray spectrometer and 70 hours of data using the Mössbauer spectrometer. The primary soil targets examined during the week are known as "Kenosha Comets" and "Lefty Ganote."

Sol-by-sol summary

In addition to daily observations of atmospheric dust levels using the panoramic camera and surveys of the sky and ground using the miniature thermal emission spectrometer, Spirit completed the following activities:

Sol 1193 (May 12, 2007): Spirit acquired alpha-particle X-ray spectrometer data from Kenosha Comets, miniature thermal emission spectrometer data from a target called "Alice Blaski," and panoramic camera images of Alice Blaski and another target known as "Mantalia." Following those tasks, Spirit napped until 11 p.m. local Mars time. Spirit then conducted a 12-hour analysis of Kenosha Comets using the alpha-particle X-ray spectrometer.

Sol 1194: Spirit started the day with acquisition of full-color images of light-colored tracks using all 13 filters of the panoramic camera. The rover acquired thumbnail images of the sky with the panoramic camera. Spirit replaced the alpha-particle X-ray spectrometer with the Mössbauer spectrometer and acquired 23.3 hours of Mössbauer data from Kenosha Comets. The rover studied a target known as "Palthon" using the miniature thermal emission spectrometer and took thumbnail images of the Martian sky with the panoramic camera.

Sol 1195: Spirit acquired another 23.3 hours worth of Mössbauer data from Kenosha Comets as well as a movie in search of dust devils using the navigation camera. The rover studied Mantalia and another target known as "Orluk" using the miniature thermal emission spectrometer.

Sol 1196: Spirit's first task of the day was to complete a sky survey using the panoramic camera. The rover stowed the robotic arm, drove backward 0.85 meters (2.8 feet), and autonomously put the alpha-particle X-ray spectrometer in position for further studies. Spirit acquired hazardous avoidance camera images prior to and after stopping and acquired navigation camera images of the terrain. Starting at 11 p.m. local Mars time, Spirit conducted an 11-hour study of the Martian atmosphere using the alpha-particle X-ray spectrometer.

Sol 1197: Spirit began the day by searching the Martian sky for clouds using the navigation camera and surveying the horizon with the panoramic camera. Spirit acquired full-color, 13-filter images of "Gertrude Weise background 3" using the panoramic camera. The rover surveyed Kenosha Comets and targets known as "Gertrude Weise background 2," "Kay Blumetta," and Gertrude Weise background 3 using the miniature thermal emission spectrometer.

Sol 1198: In the morning, Spirit acquired full-color images of Kenosha Comets using all 13 filters of the panoramic camera. The rover acquired a 360-degree panorama using the navigation camera. Spirit unstowed the robotic arm, acquired microscopic images of Lefty Ganote, and placed the alpha-particle X-ray spectrometer on Lefty Ganote. Spirit surveyed a target known as "Audrey Wagner," Kenosha Comets, and two targets in the rover's tracks known as "Tracks No. 1" and "Tracks No. 2" using the miniature thermal emission spectrometer. The rover completed a sky survey at low sun with the panoramic camera. After napping, Spirit awoke at 11 p.m. local Mars time and conducted an overnight study using the alpha-particle X-ray spectrometer that lasted 11 hours and 52 minutes.

Sol 1199 (May 18, 2007): Plans called for Spirit to begin the day with a search for dust devils using the navigation camera and a survey of a target called "Margaret Jones" using the miniature thermal emission spectrometer. After that, the rover was to place the Mössbauer spectrometer on Lefty Ganote and conduct a 23 ¼-hour analysis, acquire full-color images of targets called "Ethel Boyce" and "Joanne Weaver" using all 13 filters of the panoramic camera, and conduct another search for dust devils the following morning by collecting movie frames with the navigation camera.

Odometry

As of sol 1198 (May 17, 2007), Spirit's total odometry was 7,109.47 meters (4.42 miles).



Daily Update - 5/14/07
Spirit Continues Studies of Interesting Material Near 'Home Plate'
Spirit Status for sol 1186-1192

Spirit is healthy and has finished investigating a patch of churned-up, white-toned, silica-rich material known as "Gertrude Weise."

Meanwhile, the rover's first attempt to autonomously place and exchange scientific instruments at the same target was partially successful. Spirit backed up over Gertrude Weise to a spot 2 meters (6.6 feet) beyond it and placed the Moessbauer spectrometer on the target, but did not replace it with the microscopic imager due to potential collisions.

Plans called for Spirit to coordinate searching for dust devils on the ground with overhead scans of terrain by the Mars Reconnaissance Orbiter on sol 1191 (May 10, 2007). Also on sol 1191, the rover was to combine searching for dust devils with searching for clouds. This activity was meant as a stress test, as Spirit has already successfully completed such searches independently.

Sol-by-sol summary

In addition to daily observations of atmospheric dust levels with the panoramic camera and surveys of the sky and ground using the miniature thermal emission spectrometer, Spirit conducted the following activities:

Sol 1186 (May 5, 2007): Spirit acquired full-color, 13-filter images of a target called "Kathryn Beare" using the panoramic camera and studied Kathryn Beare and targets known as "GertrudeWeise2" and "Janice Ohara" using the miniature thermal emission spectrometer.

Sol 1187: Spirit acquired full-color, 13-filter images of Gertrude Weise, drove 5 meters (16 feet) to approach the soil target, autonomously placed the microscopic imager on target, and collected microscopic images. The rover acquired a 360-degree panorama of the terrain using the navigation camera and also acquired a mosaic of images using the panoramic camera.

Sol 1188: Spirit took thumbnail images of the sky using the panoramic camera before spending the afternoon recharging the battery with energy from the rover's solar array.

Sol 1189: Spirit acquired movies and searched for dust devils using the navigation camera and touched a surface with the Moessbauer spectrometer. Spirit then began analysis of a target called "Kenosha Comets," collecting microscopic images and placing the alpha-particle X-ray spectrometer on the target. The rover acquired data from targets known as "Virginia Bell" and "Nancy Warren" using the miniature thermal emission spectrometer. After exchanging data with the Odyssey orbiter, Spirit conducted a 12-hour, overnight analysis of Kenosha Comets using the alpha-particle X-ray spectrometer.

Sol 1190: Spirit began the day acquiring a full-color, 13-filter panorama of Virginia Bell using the panoramic camera. The rover switched tools from the alpha-particle X-ray spectrometer to the Moessbauer spectrometer for continued study of Kenosha Comets. The rover acquired data from a target known as "Thelma Hundeby" before conducting a 23-hour, overnight study of Kenosha Comets with the Moessbauer spectrometer.

Sol 1191: Plans called for Spirit to acquire panoramic-camera movies in search of dust devils in tandem with overhead scans of terrain by the High-Resolution Imaging Science Experiment on the Mars Reconnaissance Orbiter. Plans also called for the rover to search for clouds, study Gertrude Weise with the Moessbauer spectrometer, and acquire full-color, 13-filter images of a target known as "Muriel Bevis" and of the horizon with the sun halfway below it.

Sol 1192 (May 11, 2007): Plans called for Spirit to stop the Moessbauer spectrometer, survey the rover's calibration target and tracks with the miniature thermal emission spectrometer, conduct a low-sun survey, analyze Gertrude Weise and another target known as "Elizabeth Mahon" with the Moessbauer spectrometer, and survey Muriel Bevis using the miniature thermal emission spectrometer. The rover was to acquire panoramic camera images of the calibration target and conduct a low-sun survey of "McCool Hill." The following morning, Spirit was to acquire thumbnail images of the sky using the panoramic camera and survey a target known as "Marie Wegman" using the miniature thermal emission spectrometer.

Odometry

As of sol 1187 (May 6, 2007), Spirit's total odometry was 7,108.60 meters (4.42 miles).

Daily Update - 5/6/07
Spirit Examined Light--Colored Material Near 'Home Plate'
Spirit Status for sol 1179--1185

Spirit is healthy and has completed its investigation of a knobby rock target known as "GoodQuestion."

Next on Spirit's itinerary is a drive to the north and an attempt to climb onto "Home Plate." On the way, Spirit will examine white--toned material where one of the rover's wheels disturbed the soil. Observations using the miniature thermal emission spectrometer suggest it may be enriched in silica, similar to the "Elizabeth Mahon" rock outcrop the rover studied last week. Science team members have nicknamed the soil target "Gertrude Weise."

Sol--by--sol summary

In addition to daily observations of atmospheric dust levels and surveys of the sky and ground using the miniature thermal emission spectrometer, Spirit conducted the following activities:

Sol 1179 (April 28, 2007): Spirit acquired panoramic camera images of targets known as "Gooli" and "Joyce Ricketts," surveyed Gooli and a target known as "Yolande Schick" with the miniature thermal emission spectrometer, and studied GoodQuestion using the alpha--particle X--ray spectrometer.

Sol 1180: Spirit surveyed the horizon with the panoramic camera, watched for dust devils, studied GoodQuestion with the Moessbauer spectrometer, and acquired panoramic camera images of GoodQuestion. The rover also surveyed a target known as "Joan Sindelar."

Sol 1181: Spirit acquired panoramic camera images of a target known as "Everett" and studied GoodQuestion using the Moessbauer spectrometer. The rover acquired panoramic camera images of a target called "Yolanda Schick."

Sol 1182: Spirit recorded a movie in search of dust devils using the navigation camera and studied light--toned soil using the miniature thermal emission spectrometer. Spirit drove 1.9 meters (6.2 feet) to the new science target, Gertrude Weise. The rover acquired mid--drive images with the navigation camera in support of observations of GoodQuestion with the miniature thermal emission spectrometer, then made those same observations. After the drive, the rover acquired more images with both the navigation and panoramic cameras.

Sol 1183: Spirit monitored dust on the rover mast, surveyed Gertrude Weise with the miniature thermal emission spectrometer, and acquired full--color images of GoodQuestion using all 13 filters of the panoramic camera. Spirit acquired super--resolution images of a target known as "Fern Shollenberger" with the panoramic camera. The rover studied targets nicknamed "Philomena Zale," "Alma Ziegler," and "Ruth Heverly" using the miniature thermal emission spectrometer.

Sol 1184: Spirit watched for dust devils in the morning and checked for drift (changes over time) in the miniature thermal emission spectrometer. Spirit drove 6.7 meters (22 feet) to a target called "White Soil." The rover acquired post--drive images with both the navigation camera and the panoramic camera.

Sol 1185 (May 4, 2007): Plans called for Spirit to watch for dust devils in the morning and complete a systematic foreground study with the miniature thermal emission spectrometer. The rover was also to acquire navigation camera images in support of observations with the miniature thermal emission spectrometer, conduct a study of atmospheric argon using the alpha--particle X--ray spectrometer, and watch for dust devils and take panoramic images of the sky the next morning.

Odometry

As of sol 1184 (May 3, 2007), Spirit's total odometry was 7,103 meters (4.4 miles).



Daily Update - 5/4/07
Opportunity Conducts Successful Path Planning Test and Gets Another Energy Boost
Opportunity Status for sol 1157 - 1163

Summary:

Opportunity drove 224 meters (735 feet) this week.

The sol 1160 checkout of the D-star hazard avoidance path planner (drive planning software) was a resounding success. In order to make the test as safe as possible, D-star was told that rocks in its path were hazards, when actually Opportunity is capable of safely driving over them. The rover planners set a waypoint on the opposite side of “Granada” such that a straight path would have taken the rover directly over these non-hazardous hazards.

On sols 1162 and 1163 Opportunity drove towards the “Cape of Good Hope.” On sol 1164 the rover will creep several meters closer to the edge of the crater to position itself for panoramic camera imaging of “Cape St. Vincent” over the weekend. Also this weekend Opportunity will perform another test of RAT grinding.

On sol 1159 Opportunity experienced yet another dust cleaning event. Solar array energy production is now over 800 watt-hours.

Sol-by-sol summary:

In addition to Opportunity's daily science observations which include a panoramic camera tau measurement and miniature thermal emission spectrometer sky and ground stares, the rover also did the following:

Sol 1157 (April 26, 2007): Opportunity took the panoramic camera right-eye side of a long baseline stereo imaging of Cape St. Vincent, stowed its robotic arm and drove 38 meters (125 feet) toward Granada. The rover then unstowed its arm, took post-drive navigation and panoramic camera images and conducted an overnight data relay with Mars Odyssey.

Sol 1158: On this sol, the rover’s navigation camera looked for clouds and the miniature thermal emission spectrometer and the panoramic camera studied the foreground.

Sol 1159: Opportunity used its panoramic camera to take thumbnail images of the sky and its panoramic camera to survey the horizon. The miniature thermal emission spectrometer conducted a 7-point sky and ground survey.

Sol 1160: On this sol, the rover used its panoramic camera to image the target Granada. Opportunity then stowed its arm and drove 15 meters (49 feet) around Granada for a D-star checkout. The rover then unstowed its arm and conducted post-drive imaging of the path it took to get there.

Sol 1161: On this sol, the rover used its panoramic camera to complete a foreground survey. The miniature thermal emission spectrometer had a look at the sky and then the target “Malaga.” The panoramic camera imaged Granada and then the alpha particle X-ray spectrometer conducted an integration for the ongoing atmospheric Argon study.

Sol 1162: Opportunity’s panoramic camera took a color mosaic of the Granada D-star drive. The rover then stowed its arm and drove 74 meters (243 feet) toward the Cape of Good Hope. Opportunity then unstowed its arm and used both its navigation and panoramic cameras to do more imaging. There was also an overnight data relay with Mars Odyssey.

Sol 1163: On this sol, Opportunity used its navigation camera to image its own tracks. The rover then stowed its arm and drove 97 meters (318 feet) towards the Cape of Good Hope. After the drive, the rover tool images with its navigation and panoramic cameras. The navigation camera also looked for clouds.

As of sol 1163, Opportunity’s total odometry is 10,736.12 (6.67 miles).

Daily Update - 5/1/07
Spirit Discovers Changes in Soil Near 'Home Plate'
Spirit Status for sol 1172-1178

Spirit remains healthy after completing scientific investigation of a light-toned soil patch nicknamed "Everett." Everett is interesting because scientists thought it would be rich in sulfur like other soil exposures they've investigated. Instead, it turned out to be low in sulfur and ultramafic in composition -- made of iron- and magnesium-rich silicate, a chemistry often associated with volcanic rocks. Everett appears to be different from other materials the rover has encountered around "Home Plate."

On sol 1175 (April 23, 2007), Spirit bumped back approximately 60 centimeters (24 inches) to position the robotic arm for analysis of some light-toned nodules called "Slide." Scientists were hoping Slide would be high in silica, but after the investigation discovered that it looked like a still cleaner version of "Everett." The rover is now working on a scientific analysis of a new target known as "Good Question."

Spirit surveyed rocks known as "Charlene Barnett," "Fern Battaglia," and "Joyce Ricketts" as well as an area above a landslide on "Husband Hill" known as "Headscarp" and a vesicular basalt known as "Dorothy Wind."

Spirit completed work on a big-picture mosaic of the Home Plate area called the "Ballpark Panorama."

Sol-by-sol summary

In addition to daily observations of atmospheric dust levels and surveys of the sky and ground using the miniature thermal emission spectrometer, Spirit conducted the following activities:

Sol 1172 (April 20, 2007): Spirit acquired microscopic images of Everett, acquired columns 8 and 9 of the Ballpark Panorama with the panoramic camera, surveyed Charlene Barnett with the miniature thermal emission spectrometer, and studied Everett with the alpha particle X-ray spectrometer.

Sol 1173: Spirit studied Everett using the Moessbauer spectrometer and acquired columns 10 and 11 of the Ballpark Panorama.

Sol 1174: In the morning, Spirit searched for clouds using the navigation camera. The rover then resumed Moessbauer analysis of Everett, acquired column 12 of the Ballpark Panorama, and surveyed Fern Battaglia with the miniature thermal emission spectrometer.

Sol 1175: Spirit took panoramic images of the sky and crushed surface nodules and acquired movies in search of dust devils using the navigation camera. Spirit then stowed the robotic arm, rolled backward slightly to be able to reach Slide, acquired post-drive images with the navigation camera, and acquired panoramic camera images of the drive ahead.

Sol 1176: Spirit acquired movies in search of dust devils using the navigation camera, acquired panoramic camera images of the sky, stowed the robotic arm, acquired microscopic images of Slide, brushed the surface of Slide with the rock abrasion tool, and acquired microscopic images of the newly brushed surface. The rover studied Slide with the alpha-particle X-ray spectrometer and surveyed Dorothy Wind using the miniature thermal emission spectrometer.

Sol 1177: Spirit acquired panoramic camera images of Everett, searched for dust devils, and studied Slide with the Moessbauer spectrometer.

Sol 1178 (April 27, 2007): In the morning, Spirit acquired panoramic camera images of the "El Dorado" dune field, a landslide area on "Husband Hill" known as "Landslide," and the horizon. The rover continued to study Slide using the Moessbauer spectrometer, acquired panoramic camera images of Dorothy Wind, and acquired data from Joyce Ricketts using the miniature thermal emission spectrometer. The rover prepared to acquire microscopic images and alpha-particle X-ray spectrometer data from Good Question the following morning.

Odometry

As of sol 1177 (April 26, 2007), Spirit's total odometry was 7,095 meters (4.4 miles).

Daily Update - 5/1/07
Opportunity Gets a Boost of Energy and Continues Imaging
Opportunity Status for sol 1152 - 1156

Summary:

Scientists and engineers are still deciding on when and if Opportunity will enter "Victoria Crater." In the meantime, Opportunity has a lot to accomplish, such as driving back to the area of its original arrival at Victoria, approximately 600 meters away (over one-third of a mile).

In addition, Opportunity must complete checkouts of its new technologies such as the D-star hazard avoidance path planner, Visual Target Tracking, and IDD (robotic arm) auto-place. Also, on the way to "Duck Bay," several imaging campaigns require completion at the "Cape of Good Hope" and "Cape St. Mary."

Currently Opportunity is conducting long-baseline stereo imaging of "Cape St. Vincent" from a perch on the edge of "Tierra del Fuego." On sol 1157 the rover will drive north approximately 35 meters (115 feet) to a collection of rocks called "Granada" for a D-star test.

On sols 1151 and 1152 Opportunity experienced a modest dust-cleaning event. The wind cleared the solar arrays of enough dust to result in approximately 75 Watt-hours more energy per sol.

Sol-by-sol summary:

In addition to Opportunity's daily science observations, the rover completes routine panoramic camera tau measurements and miniature thermal emission spectrometer sky and ground stares.

Sol 1152 (April 21, 2007): On this sol, Opportunity's panoramic camera took images, including a 13-filter image of target "Jaen." The miniature thermal emission spectrometer stared at targets: "Badajoz," "Castellon," "Coruna," "Rioja" and Jaen. The alpha particle X-ray spectrometer checked for atmospheric argon. The panoramic camera then looked to the sky and the navigation camera looked for clouds.

Sol 1153: Opportunity stowed its robotic arm and then drove to the first-eye position for long baseline. The rover took post-drive images with its panoramic and navigation cameras. Overnight the rover sent data through Mars Odyssey.

Sol 1154: This sol involved a handful of miniature thermal emission spectrometer sky & ground stares. The panoramic camera looked at the sky and the navigation camera searched for clouds.

Sol 1155: Opportunity began to take the first eye of long-baseline stereo image of Cape St. Vincent. The robotic arm was then stowed and the rover drove 6 meters (19.7 feet) northwest to second eye position. The rover then unstowed its arm and took post-drive images with its navigation and panoramic cameras. The navigation camera also looked for clouds and monitored for dust on the rovers panoramic mast assembly (the "head" and "neck"). Overnight, the rover sent data through Mars Odyssey.

Sol 1156: On this sol, the miniature thermal emission spectrometer stared at its external calibration target and then conducted a long sky stare. The instrument also completed stares on targets "Melilla" and "Canarias." The rover's panoramic camera took a pre-sunset image and then surveyed the sky. The navigation camera looked for clouds.

Opportunity's total odometry as of sol 1155 is 10,509.41 meters (6.53 miles).

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