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Daily Update - 12/22/06
Spirit Tests New Computer Smarts, Studies Rocks and Terrain
Spirit Status for sol 1051-1057

Spirit is healthy and conducting scientific analysis of a rock target known as "Palma." During the past week, Spirit tested some new software sequences, including a "watch for dust devil" command and an automatic placement command.

On the rover's 1052nd Martian day, or sol, of exploring Mars (Dec. 18, 2006), Spirit ran part of the dust devil watch, acquiring six images during the process, but did not run the dust-devil detection part of the program. Rover handlers planned to rerun the test on sol 1058 (Dec. 24, 2006).

On sol 1053 (Dec. 19, 2006), Spirit terminated a test run of a command sequence for autonomous placement of the rover's robotic arm on a scientific target. The sequence involved touching a target with the Moessbauer spectrometer, changing tools to the microscopic imager and suspending it 10 centimeters (4 inches) above the target, changing tools to the alpha-particle X-ray spectrometer, and placing the alpha-particle X-ray spectrometer on the target. Spirit made preparations to run the test again on a new target on the same day that some Earthlings celebrate as Christmas Eve.

Sol-by-sol summary

Sol 1051 (Dec. 17, 2006): Spirit turned to face a rock outcrop known as "Esperanza," acquired images with the hazard avoidance cameras and a 360-degree panorama with the panoramic camera, and scanned the sky for clouds with the navigation camera. The rover measured atmospheric dust, looked at the sky, examined the terrain, and completed a survey of individual rock grains, known as clasts, using the panoramic camera.

Sol 1052: Spirit conducted step No. 2 of the new capability to watch for dust devils and scanned the sky for clouds with the navigation camera.

Sol 1053: Spirit acquired microscopic images of Palma, conducted step No. 2 of the autonomous placement test, monitored dust in the atmosphere with the panoramic camera, scanned the sky and ground with the miniature thermal emission spectrometer, scanned the sky for clouds with the navigation camera, and monitored the rover mast for dust accumulation.

Sol 1054: Spirit scanned the sky and ground with the miniature thermal emission spectrometer and collected miniature thermal emission spectrometer data from a ground target known as "Melchior." The rover continued to measure atmospheric dust opacity and take images of the sky with the panoramic camera.

Sol 1055 (Dec. 21, 2006): Because the rover was not stationed at the appropriate distance from the target for the automatic placement test, Spirit prepared to run the test with the alpha-particle X-ray spectrometer a second time, followed by six hours of measurement with the instrument. Spirit was slated to scan the sky, ground, and a target known as "Druzhnaya" using the miniature thermal emission spectrometer as well as acquire frames for a dust devil movie.

Sol 1056: Plans called for four hours of analysis of Palma using the Moessbauer spectrometer, measurements of atmospheric dust with the panoramic camera, a check for changes over time in the miniature thermal emission spectrometer, and a scan of the ground and sky at various elevations using the miniature thermal emission spectrometer. Spirit was also to acquire panoramic camera and stereo images of a rock nicknamed "Orcadas."

Sol 1057 (Dec. 23, 2006): Plans called for Spirit to conduct an additional 3.5 hours of study of Palma using the Moessbauer spectrometer, measure atmospheric dust with the panoramic camera, check for drift (changes in time) in the miniature thermal emission spectrometer, scan the sky and ground with the miniature thermal emission spectrometer, check the calibration target of the same instrument, and use it to scan a rock target known as "Gueslaga."

Odometry

As of sol 1054 (Dec. 20, 2006), Spirit's total odometry was 6,886.80 meters (4.28 miles).

Daily Update - 12/22/06
Opportunity Continues to Look for Entry Point into 'Victoria Crater'
Opportunity Status for sol 1029-1037

Opportunity is healthy and continues to gather data in search of a potential future entry point into "Victoria Crater." The rover is traversing the crater rim near an alcove known as "Bottomless Bay," assessing whether it might eventually serve as an entry point, and collecting images of the crater's interior cliffs.

On Dec. 17, 2006, the rover's 1030th sol, or Martian day on Mars, Opportunity began testing software to enable autonomous placement of the robotic arm and scientific instruments on targets of scientific interest.

Between sols 1029 (Dec. 16, 2006) and 1034 (Dec. 21, 2006), Opportunity drove 41 meters (135 feet).

Sol-by-sol summary

Sol 1029 (Dec. 16, 2006): Opportunity measured atmospheric dust, acquired navigation camera and panoramic camera images of Bottomless Bay, scanned the sky and ground with the miniature thermal emission spectrometer, and acquired panoramic images of points of scientific interest known as "Malua," "Timor" and "Cebu."

Sol 1030: Opportunity measured atmospheric dust, performed step No. 3 of the autonomous placement sequence for the robotic arm, acquired forward-looking images following the day's drive, scanned the sky for clouds with the navigation camera, and surveyed the sky, ground, and external calibration target using the miniature thermal emission spectrometer.

Sol 1031: Opportunity measured atmospheric dust, scanned the sky for clouds, and surveyed the sky and ground with the miniature thermal emission spectrometer.

Sol 1032: Following the day's drive, Opportunity acquired images of the surrounding area, including rearward-looking views, using the navigation camera. Opportunity measured atmospheric dust and surveyed the horizon with the miniature thermal emission spectrometer.

Sol 1033: Opportunity measured atmospheric dust, performed step No. 2 of the sequence for autonomous placement of the robotic arm, surveyed the sky and ground with the miniature thermal emission spectrometer, and acquired panoramic camera images looking southwest at Bottomless Bay.

Sol 1034: Following another day's drive, Opportunity acquired rearward-looking and forward-looking images of surrounding terrain using the navigation camera. Opportunity measured atmospheric dust, surveyed the sky and ground with the miniature thermal emission spectrometer, and acquired images of the sky using the panoramic camera.

Sol 1035: Plans call for Opportunity to measure atmospheric dust, use the rock abrasion tool to brush the surface of a rock target known as "Rio de Janeiro," and acquire post-brush microscopic images of the dust-free surface. The rover is then to collect data about the rock using the alpha-particle X-ray spectrometer, survey the sky at high sun using the panoramic camera, and scan the sky and ground with the miniature thermal emission spectrometer.

Sol 1036: Plans call for Opportunity to measure atmospheric dust and acquire a full-color, 13-filter mosaic of Rio de Janeiro using the panoramic camera and to study the outcrop with the Moessbauer spectrometer. The rover is instructed to scan the sky, ground, and points of scientific interest known as "Catalonia," "Valencia," Andalucia," "Aragon," "Asturia," "Cantabria" and "Basque," as well as the rover's external calibration target, using the miniature thermal emission spectrometer.

Sol 1037 (Dec. 24, 2006): Plans call for Opportunity to measure atmospheric dust and acquire a full-color, 13-filter mosaic of Bottomless Bay using the panoramic camera. Opportunity is to survey the sky, ground, external calibration target, and scientific targets nicknamed "Murcia," "Navarra," "Catalonia" and "Valencia" using the miniature thermal emission spectrometer, and to scan the sky for clouds.

Odometry

As of sol 1034 (Dec. 21, 2006), Opportunity's total odometry was 9,758 meters (6.1 miles).

Daily Update - 12/18/06
Relay Link Restored After Orbiter's Recovery
Spirit Status for sol 1043-1050

After Spirit drove on sol 1041 (Dec. 7, 2006), NASA's Mars Odyssey orbiter went into safe mode before the rover's could relay data to Earth about results of the drive. (Safe mode is a protective state during which only the systems essential to spacecraft health continue operating. This incident of Odyssey temporarily going into safe mode has been attributed to a burst of solar activity.) Since the rover team didn't have current information about Spirit's position and state, the rover spent eight successive Martian days, or sols, collecting untargeted remote sensing data.

Data transmission directly to Earth from Spirit on sol 1046 (Dec. 12, 2006) confirmed that Spirit was healthy. Odyssey recovered the following day and resumed relaying data from Spirit, transmitted from the rover to the orbiter in the UHF radio band.

Sol-by-sol summary

Sol 1043 (Dec. 9, 2006): Spirit surveyed the rover's tracks using the miniature thermal emission spectrometer and measured atmospheric dust opacity with the panoramic camera. The rover surveyed the sky and ground with the miniature thermal emission spectrometer.

Sol 1044: Spirit surveyed the area where the rover spent the past Martian winter with the miniature thermal emission spectrometer and took panoramic camera images of the area.

Sol 1045: Spirit took thumbnail images of the sky with the panoramic camera and scanned the sky for clouds with the navigation camera. Spirit monitored the rover mast for dust and relayed the first bits of scientific data collected and stored on sol 1040 (Dec. 6, 2006).

Sol 1046: Spirit surveyed the rover's winter haven with the miniature thermal emission spectrometer and monitored atmospheric dust with the panoramic camera. The rover scanned the sky and ground with the miniature thermal emission spectrometer.

Sol 1047: Spirit collected miniature thermal emission spectrometer data from a soil target known as "Tyrone" and continued acquiring panoramic camera images of the rover's winter haven.

Sol 1048: Spirit acquired thumbnail images of the sky with the panoramic camera and scanned the sky for clouds with the navigation camera. The rover monitored atmospheric dust with the panoramic camera, and surveyed the sky, ground, and calibration target with the miniature thermal emission spectrometer.

Sol 1049: Spirit acquired navigation camera images in support of miniature thermal emission spectrometer measurements of the rover's surroundings. The rover monitored atmospheric dust with the panoramic camera and acquired panoramic images of the area ahead.

Sol 1050 (Dec. 16, 2006): Spirit's instructions call for scanning for clouds and dust devils with the navigation camera, surveying the mast for dust accumulation and observing the sky and ground with the miniature thermal emission spectrometer.

Odometry

As of sol 1048 (Dec. 14, 2006), Spirit's total odometry was 6,885.62 meters meters (4.28 miles).

Daily Update - 12/18/06
Opportunity Looks for Entry Point into Crater
Opportunity Status for sol 1022-1028

Opportunity is healthy and driving toward "Bottomless Bay" to gather data on whether this would be a suitable future entry point into "Victoria Crater." The rover will continue traversing the crater rim and collecting images of the cliff walls.

On Dec. 6, 2006, corresponding to the 1020th sol, or Martian day, of Opportunity's mission on the surface of Mars, NASA's Mars Odyssey orbiter entered safe mode, a protective state during which only those systems vital to the orbiter's health continue to operate. Odyssey provides the relay communications link for most data received from the Opportunity and Spirit rovers. Rover handlers responded to the temporary unavailability of Odyssey by planning only one sol of driving and limiting remote sensing activities until the orbiter returned to normal relay mode on Opportunity's sol 1026 (Dec. 12, 2006).

Between sols 1021 (Dec. 7, 2006) and 1027 (Dec. 13, 2006), Opportunity drove 84 meters (276 feet).

Sol-by-sol summary

Sol 1022 (Dec. 8, 2006): Opportunity took backward-looking panoramic images, monitored the rover mast for dust, acquired thumbnail panoramic images of the sky, and measured atmospheric dust.

Sol 1023: Opportunity measured atmospheric dust and acquired forward-looking images using the panoramic camera, acquired images to accompany surveys by the miniature thermal emission spectrometer using the navigation camera, and scanned the sky and ground using the miniature thermal emission spectrometer. The rover monitored atmospheric dust at sunset, measured atmospheric density of argon gas with the alpha-particle X-ray spectrometer, and scanned the sky for clouds with the navigation camera.

Sol 1024: Opportunity measured atmospheric dust with the panoramic camera, scanned the sky and ground with the miniature thermal emission spectrometer, and acquired panoramic camera images of the work volume to be examined using the instruments on the rover's robotic arm.

Sol 1025: Opportunity measured atmospheric dust with the panoramic camera, surveyed the sky and ground with the miniature thermal emission spectrometer, scanned the sky for clouds with the navigation camera, and acquired thumbnail images of the sky using the panoramic camera.

Sol 1026: Opportunity measured atmospheric dust with the panoramic camera, surveyed the horizon with the miniature thermal emission spectrometer, scanned the sky for clouds with the navigation camera, and acquired thumbnail images of the sky using the panoramic camera.

Sol 1027: Opportunity measured atmospheric dust with the panoramic camera, drove 30 meters (98 feet), acquired navigation camera images of the area ahead, and acquired post-drive panoramic camera images and atmospheric dust measurements. The rover surveyed the sky and ground with the miniature thermal emission spectrometer and scanned the sky for clouds with the navigation camera.

Sol 1028 (Dec. 14, 2006): Opportunity measured atmospheric dust with the panoramic camera, drove 40 meters (131 feet), took post-drive navigation camera images, monitored the rover mast for dust, and surveyed the sky and ground with the miniature thermal emission spectrometer.

Odometry

As of sol 1027 (Dec. 13, 2006), Opportunity's total odometry was 9,669 meters (6.01 miles).

Daily Update - 12/11/06
Spirit Slowly Resumes Driving on Martian Terrain
Spirit Status for sol 1039-1042

Despite a non-functioning right front wheel, Spirit is healthy and on the move. The rover completed short drives on Martian days, or sols, 1039 (Dec. 5, 2006) and 1041 (Dec. 7, 2006) on its way toward a rock target informally named "Esperanza."

Sol-by-sol summary

Sol 1039 (Dec. 5, 2006): Spirit drove 1 meter (3.3 feet) and acquired images after the drive using the hazard avoidance and navigation cameras. The rover took a super-resolution image with the panoramic camera and scanned the Martian sky for clouds with the navigation camera.

Sol 1040: Spirit scanned the sky, ground, and Esperanza using the miniature thermal emission spectrometer. The rover surveyed the sky and the horizon with the panoramic camera.

Sol 1041: Spirit turned in the direction of Esperanza, then drove another 1.5 meters (5 feet) toward the rock. Spirit acquired more detailed images after the drive with the hazard avoidance camera and a 360-degree view of the rover's surroundings with the navigation camera. The rover searched the sky for clouds with the navigation camera and took panoramic images of the "El Dorado" dune field and the Martian sky.

Sol 1042 (Dec. 8, 2006): Spirit panoramic camera took images for a full-color, 13-filter mosaic of the area studied by the rover during the last Martian winter. Spirit also scanned the area with the miniature thermal emission spectrometer.

Odometry

As of sol 1039 (Dec. 5, 2006), Spirit's total odometry was 6,880.86 meters (4.28 miles).

Daily Update - 12/8/06
Opportunity's Odometer Reaches Six-Mile Mark at 'Bottomless Bay'
Opportunity Status for sol 1016-1021

Opportunity is healthy and wrapping up imaging of "Bottomless Bay" (Bahia sin Fondo) at "Victoria Crater."

On Sol 1016, Opportunity arrived at Bottomless Bay and began making science observations. Opportunity also performed step one of a series of checkouts of its new capability for more autonomous assessment of where it is safe to place its robotic arm. This test did not involve any arm motion.

On Sol 1018, the alpha particle X-ray spectrometer measured the atmosphere's argon density. While pointed at the atmosphere, the instrument was turned on and left integrating for almost three hours. With the temperature and argon density in hand, scientists can calculate what percentage of the atmosphere at the rover site is argon. By doing measurements of this nature, scientists can get a better understanding of how atmospheric gases mix between the poles and the equator.

On Sols 1019, 1020 and 1021 Opportunity was busy completing photography of Bottomless Bay.

Sol-by-sol summaries

Daily, Opportunity completes science observations that include: tau (atmospheric clarity) measurements with the panoramic camera, cloud searches with the navigation camera, and stares at the sky and ground with the miniature thermal emission spectrometer.

Sol 1016 (Dec. 2, 2006): Opportunity drove for two hours, adding 30 meters (98 feet) onto its drive toward Bottomless Bay. The rover then took a navigation camera mosaic in the drive direction and completed step one of checking the capability for autonomous placement of the robotic arm.

Sol 1017: Opportunity used part of this sol to conduct the daily science observations and then used the rest of the sol to recharge.

Sol 1018: The rover examined the ground in front of it with the panoramic camera and the miniature thermal emission spectrometer. Those instruments were also used to monitor dust accumulation on the solar panels. The alpha particle X-ray spectrometer began a 2.5-hour argon density measurement.

Sol 1019: The panoramic camera took images for the first half of a stereo mosaic of Bottomless Bay. Opportunity then turned so it would be in a better position for communication.

Sol 1020: Opportunity used part of this sol to conduct the daily science observations and then used the rest of the sol to recharge.

Sol 1021 (Dec. 7, 2006): The rover took a 2-meter (6.6 feet) drive along Bottomless Bay and the panoramic camera took the second half of the stereo mosaic of Bottomless Bay.

As of sol 1016's drive, Opportunity's total odometry is 9,584.69 meters (6 miles)!

Daily Update - 12/6/06
Spirit Slowly Begins Driving Again
Spirit Status for sol 1024-1038

Spirit is healthy and preparing to drive away from the rover's winter station after completing scientific investigation of a rock nicknamed "King George Island." The rock, according to principal investigator Steve Squyres, contains some of the best-rounded grains ever seen in a Martian rock. Scientists will try to determine how the grains formed -- perhaps with help from wind or water.

Spirit arrived at King George Island on Sol 1022 (Dec. 17, 2006) after a short bump (very short drive) from a disturbed soil target nicknamed "Bear Island." Upon arrival, Spirit took a mosaic of microscopic images of King George and collected data using the alpha-particle X-ray and Moessbauer spectrometers. Spirit then brushed the target with the wire bristles on the rock abrasion tool before collecting more alpha-particle X-ray and Moessbauer data for comparison with data from the unbrushed surface.

Spirit's next planned target is a rock aptly nicknamed "Esperanza," the Spanish word for hope. The first of several drives to reach that goal began on Sol 1037 (Dec. 3, 2006). On Sol 1030 (Nov. 25, 2006), the Mars Reconnaissance Orbiter used its high-resolution camera to acquire images of Spirit's "Winter Haven," where the rover has spent its second Martian winter, and of Spirit's lander, which arrived on Mars Jan. 4, 2004.

Sol-by-sol summary

In addition to Spirit's daily science observations, which include measuring atmospheric dust opacity with the panoramic camera, surveying the sky and ground using the miniature thermal emission spectrometer, and scanning the Martian sky for clouds using the navigation camera, the Mars rover did the following work:

Sol 1024 (Nov. 19, 2006): Spirit collected data about the Martian atmosphere using the alpha-particle X-ray spectrometer and monitored dust accumulation on the panoramic camera mast.

Sol 1025: Spirit acquired super-resolution panoramic camera images of the circular plateau-like feature known as "Home Plate" and measured the amount of light detectable at night and during Martian twilight.

Sol 1026: Spirit coordinated daily science observations with an overflight of the Mars Reconnaissance Orbiter. The rover measured surface reflectivity using the panoramic camera.

Sol 1027: Spirit acquired a mosaic of images of King George Island and collected data from the same rock target using the alpha-particle X-ray spectrometer.

Sol 1028: Spirit studied King George Island using the Moessbauer spectrometer.

Sol 1029: Spirit studied Esperanza and two other rock targets known as "Zhong Shan" and "Korolev" using the miniature thermal emission spectrometer.

Sol 1030: Spirit continued to assess King George Island using the Moessbauer spectrometer and investigated a distant rock outcrop known as "Oberth" using the miniature thermal emission spectrometer.

Sol 1031: Spirit brushed the surface of King George Island using the rock abrasion tool and acquired microscopic images and alpha-particle X-ray data of the freshly brushed surface.

Sol 1032: Spirit acquired Moessbauer data from the brushed surface of King George Island.

Sol 1033: Spirit acquired information about rock targets known as "Syowa" and "Wiltgen" using the miniature thermal emission spectrometer.

Sol 1034: Spirit collected microscopic images of two soil targets known as "Clarence" and "Deception" and recommenced analysis of the brushed surface of King George Island using the Moessbauer spectrometer.

Sol 1035: Spirit analyzed a spot on the same rock surface but offset from the target known as King George Island by acquiring microscopic images and collecting corresponding compositional data with the alpha particle X-ray spectrometer.

Sol 1036: Spirit acquired a 13-filter, full-color panorama of the soil target known as "Tyrone" and again analyzed Korolev and Esperanza from a distance using the miniature thermal emission spectrometer.

Sol 1037: Spirit stowed the robotic arm carrying scientific instruments and began driving toward Esperanza.

Sol 1038 (Dec. 4, 2006): Spirit tested new capabilities for automated placement of the robotic arm.

Odometry

As of sol 1036 (Dec. 2, 2006), Spirit's total odometry was 6,877.63 meters (4.27 miles).

Daily Update - 12/4/06
More Remote Science for Spirit
Spirit Status for sol 1017-1023

Spirit is healthy. Downlink of information from the rover resumed after a 48-hour gap in downlink that resulted from NASA's Mars Odyssey releasing most of its Deep Space Network coverage earlier in the week to Mars Global Surveyor to support efforts to recover communications with Global Surveyor.

This week, Spirit changed robotic-arm targets from "Berkner Island" to "Bear Island" and executed a microscopic image mosaic, five hours of data collection with the alpha particle X-ray spectrometer and nearly 48 hours with the Moessbauer spectrometer. The engineering team planned and commanded Spirit's second drive of the season on sol 1022.

Sol-by-sol summaries:

Sol 1017 (Nov. 12, 2006): Spirit used its microscopic imager to take exposures for a stereo mosaic of target Bear Island, then placed the alpha particle X-ray spectrometer on that target. After the Mars Odyssey pass, the rover took a tau (atmospheric clarity) measurement and then began a five-hour reading with the alpha particle X-ray spectrometer.

Sol 1018: The panoramic camera took thumbnail images of the sky, and the navigation camera scanned for clouds. The team changed tools to the Moessbauer spectrometer and used it for a 10-hour integration on Bear Island.

Sol 1019: In the morning, the miniature thermal emission spectrometer assessed the sky and ground, and the panoramic camera examined the sky. The miniature thermal emission spectrometer then stared at target "Baudoin." Some engineering maintenance was done and then the Moessbauer spectrometer was restarted on target Bear Island.

Sol 1020: In the morning, the miniature thermal emission spectrometer assessed the sky and ground, and the panoramic camera examined the sky. The rover restarted the Moessbauer data-collection on Bear Island for a 23-hour, overnight integration.

Sol 1021: Spirit's miniature thermal emission spectrometer assessed light-toned material in the rover's tracks in the morning. The Moessbauer spectrometer was restarted on Bear Island. The panoramic camera conducted a light experiment by taking multiple images throughout the day. The miniature thermal emission spectrometer assessed target "Allan Hills" during the communications pass with Mars Odyssey. After the Odyssey pass, the Moessbauer observation was completed and the panoramic camera took a tau measurement at sunset.

Sol 1022: Spirit's arm was stowed before the rover began a short drive to a nearby outcrop. After the drive the navigation and hazard avoidance cameras took images. A tau measurement was taken as well.

Sol 1023 (Nov. 28): The panoramic camera took images of targets "El Dorado" and "Prat" as well as thumbnail images of the sky. The miniature thermal emission spectrometer conducted a sky and ground observation.

As of sol 1023, Spirit's odometry is 6,877.63 meters (4.27 miles).

Daily Update - 12/4/06
Opportunity Tests New Driving Software and Helps Its Sister Spacecraft
Opportunity Status for sol 1002-1015

Opportunity is healthy and making progress imaging "Victoria Crater." Sol 1002 began with a short drive to the edge of "Cape St. Mary" in order to take better images of the northeast side of "Cape Verde."

On Sols 1005 and 1006 (Nov. 21 and 22, 2006), Opportunity participated in efforts to recover communications with NASA's Mars Global Surveyor orbiter, which had not communicated with Earth for more than two weeks at that point. Mars Global Surveyor was sent a command in the blind to try to communicate with Opportunity via their UHF radios on each of these two sols. Alas, Opportunity never received any signal from the orbiter on either attempt.

On Sol 1009, Opportunity departed Cape St. Mary and headed toward a point overlooking "Bottomless Bay" (Bahia sin Fondo) more than 100 meters (328 feet) away. Drives on sols 1009, 1012 and 1014 added about 80 meters (262 feet) in the direction of Bottomless Bay.

On Sol 1013, Opportunity added to the rapidly growing list of simultaneous, multi-spacecraft science observations with a coordinated overflight by the Mars Reconnaissance Orbiter of the area around Opportunity. At a predetermined time, that orbiter's remote sensing instruments took measurements in the vicinity of Opportunity while Opportunity took "ground truth" measurements of the atmosphere and ground.

Sol 1014's drive included the first step in a series of checkouts of the rover's new "D-star" drive capability. This was added to create a more capable autonomous navigation system. The benefits include better hazard-avoidance capability, less user intervention and longer hazard-avoidance traverses per sol.

Sol-by-sol summaries:

Sol 1002 (Nov. 18, 2006): The rover drove 1.04 meters (3.41 feet), then conducted remote sensing of Cape Verde.

Sol 1003: Opportunity conducted untargeted remote sensing.

Sol 1004: Opportunity conducted untargeted remote sensing.

Sol 1005: The rover used its panoramic camera to collect images for a mosaic of Cape Verde. This was the first sol during which Opportunity attempted to hear from Mars Global Surveyor.

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