Keck Interferometer

Mission Summary

The Keck Interferometer is a ground-based instrument that combines the light from the twin Keck telescopes to create an instrument equal in power to an 85-meter telescope that can detect and study stars and planets beyond our solar system.

Astronomers use the interferometer, which provides vital information about exoplanets and planetary formation, to measure the diameters of stars, disks orbiting nearby stars and the orbital characteristics of binary systems.

Scientific Instrument(s)

- Keck Telescopes (2)
- Adaptive optics system
- Dual-star module (DSM)
- Coude Train
- Beam transport system
- Delay Lines & Metrology
- Fringe Tracker
- Angle Tracker
- Nulling Combiner
- Control System


Type: Airborne/Ground
 
Status: Current
 
Launch Date: March 12, 2001
 
Target: Universe
 
Current Location: Mauna Kea, Hawaii
 
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