Interstellar Voyager
"Voyager is in interstellar space — the space between the stars."
- Dr. Ed Stone, Voyager Project Scientist

Voyager 1 has entered interstellar space. The NASA spacecraft, which rose from Earth on a September morning 36 years ago, has traveled farther than anyone, or anything, in history. Now Voyager 1 is in the space between the stars. How did Voyager 1 get there? How do we know and where is it going? For more information on humanity's first emissary to what lies beyond, explore the videos, images and stories below.



This artist's concept shows the Voyager 1 spacecraft entering the space between stars
The Space Between: This artist's concept shows the Voyager 1 spacecraft entering the space between stars. Interstellar space is dominated by plasma, ionized gas (illustrated here as brownish haze), that was thrown off by giant stars millions of years ago. Image credit: NASA/JPL-Caltech
› Full image and caption
In 1990, Voyager 1 took the famous
Pale Blue, Take Two: In 1990, Voyager 1 took the famous "Pale Blue Dot" picture looking back at Earth. In 2013, the Very Long Baseline Array got the reverse-angle shot — this radio telescope image showing the signal of the spacecraft as a similar point of light. Image credit: NRAO/AUI/NSF
› Full image and caption
Artist's concept puts solar system distances in perspective
You Are Here, Voyager: This artist's concept puts huge solar system distances in perspective. The scale bar is measured in astronomical units (AU), with each set distance beyond 1 AU representing 10 times the previous distance. Each AU is equal to the distance from the sun to the Earth. It took from 1977 to 2012 for Voyager 1 to reach the edge of interstellar space. Image credit: NASA/JPL-Caltech
› Full image and caption
Gliese 445
Reaching for the Star: In 40,000 years, Voyager 1 will be closer to another star than it is to our sun. This star (circled), is know by two names: AC +79 3888 and Gliese 445. It is 17.6 light-years from Earth and is speeding toward Voyager 1 faster than the spacecraft is traveling toward it. Image credit: Caltech/Palomar
› Full image and caption
1972 Voyager Science Team first meeting
Time Capsule: This photograph was taken in 1972 at NASA's Jet Propulsion Laboratory, Pasadena, Calif., during the first science steering group meeting for the Voyager mission, then called "Mariner-Jupiter Saturn '77." Image credit: NASA/JPL-Caltech
› Full image and caption
Artist's concept of Voyager 1 in interstellar space, with Voyager 2
Beyond the Bubble: The general locations of Voyager 1 and 2 are shown in this illustration at the edge of the heliosphere, the bubble created by solar wind. Image credit: NASA/JPL-Caltech
› Full image and caption
Layers of the heliosheath
Layers of Intrigue: This illustration shows the outer layers of our solar bubble, or heliosphere, and the interstellar space that Voyager 1 is currently investigating. Image credit: NASA/JPL-Caltech
› Full image and caption
Artist's concept of Voyager with antennas visible
Now, Voyager: This artist's concept shows NASA's Voyager spacecraft against a field of stars. Image credit: NASA/JPL-Caltech
› Full image and caption

› Gallery: More images from the Voyager mission

› Back to top

NASA News Conference to Discuss Voyager Entering Interstellar Space: NASA scientists and engineers discuss another first in the history of exploration and provide details about the most distant human-made object, Voyager 1, as it entered interstellar space, the space between the stars.

Voyager Reaches Interstellar Space: Find out how the team discovered the craft had reached the space between the stars.
Messages to Voyager: Neil deGrasse Tyson, Wil Wheaton, Carl Sagan's son and others send well wishes to the spacecraft.

The Sound of Interstellar Space: Hear a wave of particles wiggle interstellar plasma -- data that revealed Voyager had entered this new region.
› Listen and download the mp3
Voyage of Discovery: Take a virtual ride with Voyager 1 and 2 past Jupiter, Saturn, Uranus and Neptune.
Carl Sagan's "Cosmos": Hear an excerpt from "Cosmos," read by Carl Sagan. This animation was created as part of NASA's 50th anniversary celebration in 2008.
› Back to top