Check the map above to see where moon-gazers will be viewing the lunar eclipse on the morning of Saturday, Dec. 10. If you've subscribed to the campaign (by *texting IMTHERE to 67463 or entering your cell phone number and carrier in the "Join the Conversation" box above) you'll receive instructions on how to text us your location and comments. (*available to users in the U.S., message and data rates may apply.)
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Latest Comments

Haven't seen much in Scottsdale AZ
(Posted: Dec. 10, 2011 7:46 am)
Crystal clear (cloudless in east Hawaii - big island!!) gorgeous sky and dark orange moon. Truly spectacular
(Posted: Dec. 10, 2011 7:45 am)
Too cloudy. Didnt get a great look at the eclipse. And the sun coming up didnt help.
(Posted: Dec. 10, 2011 7:28 am)
Amazing sunrise in Phoenix and the eclipsed moon setting
(Posted: Dec. 10, 2011 7:27 am)
Can't c
(Posted: Dec. 10, 2011 7:16 am)
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Lunar Eclipse 2011: Will You Be There?

The last total lunar eclipse until 2014 will grace the skies the morning of Saturday, Dec. 10 at about 6 a.m. PST, and we want you to be there! Text, tweet, post or snap, there are a number of ways to join NASA/JPL for this stellar event, connect with other moon-gazers and win a free "I Was There" virtual badge.

How to Participate:


1. TEXT MESSAGE

Text IMTHERE to 67463 to share your eclipse viewing spot and comments or enter your 10-digit cell phone number in the "Join the Conversation" box above. (Available to users in the U.S., message and data rates may apply). To join the campaign, just text in with the zip code for your viewing location, and see it plotted on the map above. Then, on Saturday morning, you'll receive a reminder to go out and watch plus instructions on how to share your comments via text.

2. TWITTER

You don't have to be in the U.S. to share your lunar eclipse location and comments. Just include @NASA/JPL and #eclipse in your tweets to see your comments displayed in our Twitter stream (right). Don't forget to tell us where you're watching the eclipse!

3. FACEBOOK

Join JPL's Total Lunar Eclipse event page on Facebook to share your experiences and upload lunar eclipse photos. After the eclipse, NASA/JPL will pick one lucky winner to have his or her photo featured on JPL's Space Images website and available for download as an official NASA/JPL wallpaper.

4. ONLINE

Can't see the eclipse from your area? Slooh, the online Space Camera, will broadcast a live feed of the total lunar eclipse from several locations, starting at 6:06 a.m. PST (9:06 a.m. EST). Watch here: http://events.slooh.com/. Visit this page throughout the weekend to find others who are watching in your area, view comments and updates, check the weather, and explore more resources, including eclipse timetables and related events.

Lunar Eclipse Viewing Tips

If you’re in the western half of North America, set your alarm bright and early! The eclipse will happen just before dawn Saturday morning, from 6:05-6:57 a.m. PST (9:05-9:57 EST). A partial eclipse will be visible to those of you in central North America, though the brightening dawn may obstruct some of your view. Those farthest east will miss out on the “live” event, but you can watch via Slooh online.

Observers in Australia and East Asia will have a prime view. The eclipsed moon will hang high in the middle of the night, local time.

For Europe and Africa, the eclipsed moon will be visible during the early evening of Dec. 10.

Learn more about when and where to view the eclipse on the JPL Blog. JPL astronomer Steve Edberg shares viewing times and tips.

Weather

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Dont reside in the US? World Weather

Resources

CURRENT MOON

Eclipse Timetables

Lunar Eclipse Timetable

Choose Your Timezone

› Pacific Standard Time

› Mountain Standard Time

› Central Standard Time

› Eastern Standard Time

› Universal Time

Twitter: #eclipse

Join the conversation with NASA/JPL on Twitter. Just mention @NASA/JPL and #eclipse in your tweets. Don't forget to tell us where you're watching the eclipse!

NASAJPL on Twitter

Can't See the Eclipse?

Slooh, the online Space Camera, will broadcast a live feed of the total lunar eclipse from several locations, starting at 6:06 a.m. PST (9:06 a.m. EST).
› Click to watch

watch the lunar eclipse live on Slooh

Eclipse Events


Total Lunar Eclipse Facebook Event Page Facebook: Total Lunar Eclipse event page
Night Sky Network Night Sky Network: astronomy events and activities